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ACHOO
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is an oddball question, but I'm sure someone will know here. I already have some anti-seize compound for when I'm connecting dissimilar metals on my bike, chiefly Ti.

I'm about to swap out spark plugs on my vehicle, and it seems like the exact same stuff is used. (?)

Makes sense to me, but wanted to confirm.
 

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to my knowledge, same stuff.

Of course, if it was a $5000 bike, I'd probably buy the bike specific stuff. If it was a brand new $40,000 car, buy the car specific stuff.
 

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ACHOO
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ha, indeed - I'm not about to skimp on my vehicle just because I have some bike stuff lying around. However, it must be the exact same stuff, right? The only thing I can think of is that the automotive might have better heat resistance, but I'm just guessing at that.
 

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Phlegm,

I can't directly answer your question, and probably no one can, but for what it's worth I've been using my auto stuff on everything for at least 20 years and have never had a single issue.

I don't think heat resistance will be a concern. It doesn't stay wet anyway. The graphite and other solids that stay behind do the work.

Were I in your position I'd probably pick up a bottle of the Permatex auto stuff. Nothing will ruin your day like stripping an aluminum head....whether now or next spark plug change.
 

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ACHOO
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That sounds logical. No point in risking anything for the sake of a few bucks, but I still suspect they are identical compounds.

Thx for all the input.
 

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Don't overthink it :)

I do like the stick based/semi-solid silver kind for small bolts. I have a big tub of the more liquid type (with brush on lid) for larger jobs.
 

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ACHOO
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ha, thanks for all the input guys. :)

I ultimately went with some LocTite for automotive. Says it works up to 1600F which is impressive.

I still think the stuff is the same, and I rarely generate 1600F on my bike - unless I light a fart.
 

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I've always used the auto stuff as well. No problems at all. Another auto motive product I like is mobile 1 grease. I use if when ever I have a application where I am looking for a thick grease.

Al
 

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At Work
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Antisieze, Grease, Have heard of people taking a candle and just rubbing the bolts down the side and coating the threads with the wax...... Your just using something to act as a barrier.
 

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Workin for the weekend!
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I use stuff that is conductive for plug installs. It's either Graphite or copper based. The big thing with plugs is the steel into aluminum and the mega long intervals that the OEs spec for maintenance now. 60,000mile 100,000km maint intervals are a long time for dissimilar metals to fuse. Tearing out threads from a cylinder head is expensive work to fix.
 

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ACHOO
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I appreciate all the input, but some people might have reversed my scenario. I have the Park anti-seize for bikes, and wondered if it would be appropriate for automotive spark plugs - not the other way around.
 

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This is what I use. I don't know if it is good or bad for bike applications, but I haven't had any trouble with it.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Magically Delicious
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Anti-seize lubricants vary in the application, but for most general purposes, it does not matter. Any of the anti-seize lubricants found locally will be perfectly compatible.

The differences in anti-seize lubricants are generally in place for the variable specific contact metals under high temperatures, high pressure or both high temps and high pressure. Molybdenum Disulphide, graphite, copper, nickle and aluminum are the most common components. Graphite acts as both a lubricant and an electrical conductor.

The copper, nickle and aluminum are largely for high temperature applications. Probably not necessary for a bike. Molybdenum Disulphide is the predominate anti-corrosive agent and high pressure lubricant.

The specifications for any automotive or industrial anti-seize lubricant application will grossly exceed any necessary application specification found on a bike.
 

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ACHOO
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Again, I thank everyone for the input.

Agreed, automotive-specific applications would surely exceed anything you need for a bike.

However, that wasn't my original question - it was the reverse. :) I have the bike-specific anti-seize - would it be applicable to spark plugs? There has been no definitive answer, so I bought additional automotive anti-seize as there's no need to risk it.
 

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Magically Delicious
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Yeah, I didn't address your original question...

I'm going to bet that no anti-seize that is being marketed for the bike market is specifically engineered and concocted for 'bikes only".

Given the vastly large automotive and industrial applications of the anti-seize market, the bike packaged and marketed anti-seize is nothing more than re-packaged and private labeled automotive stuff.

Generally speaking, I would have no problem using a bike marketed anti-seize product on my car's spark plugs.
 

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I'm sure that's true of many (or even most) bicycle related consumables...repackaged from other industries.

I'd still have a hard time using it on my spark plugs. Cylinder heads are far too expensive to take a gamble over a few dollars.
 

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I don't know that I've ever actually seen bicycle specific stuff. MSDS is a requirement of selling in the USA, when in doubt, check it. It has all the pertinent info.
 
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