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Thats great, sorry to say I just ordered mine two weeks ago and surely paid more than $125.00 to get it directly from TrickStuff.

My question is in order to adjust the chain tension is that done with the two allen screws on the face of the BB? If so that would require you to remove the cranks in order to secure the two screws down correct?
 

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At least two attempts have been made to use this forum as a place to introduce an eccentric bottom bracket for standard frames. Both of them seem to have failed. I have never seen either product on the market. Let me introduce another one. Unlike the others, this one is currently in production and it is ready for sale.

Forward Components is a new company, and the eccentric bottom bracket is our first product. It is an eccentric bottom bracket that will fit any bicycle frame with a 68mm bottom bracket shell using standard 1.37"x24tpi English threads, It is for outboard bearing systems using Hollowtech 2 compatible cranks.

There is one similar eccentric bottom bracket product on the market that is currently available. That is the well known Exzentriker from the German company Trickstuff. Unlike the Trickstuff EBB, the Forward Components eccentric bottom bracket is moderately priced at $125US.

Have a look, and tell us what you think. A link is provided at the bottom of this posting.

The EBB shown in the link is a tested prototype, so don't be put off by a few scratches and a rough finish. The full production version will be shown next week. We just wanted to show you what is in the pipeline before you send your Christmas wish list to Santa.

http://www.forwardcomponents.blogspot.com/
 

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Looks good to me - if I didn't already have an Exzentriker then I'd be getting my order in !

It probably wouldn't work out a whole lot cheaper for us Europeans though, if we got stung for import duty and VAT....
 

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one chain loop
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that would be one on my christmas list for sure. good move on enduro bearings too, i just hope it can be easily serviced without special tools. :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
 

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MCSEDanny said:
Thats great, sorry to say I just ordered mine two weeks ago and surely paid more than $125.00 to get it directly from TrickStuff.

My question is in order to adjust the chain tension is that done with the two allen screws on the face of the BB? If so that would require you to remove the cranks in order to secure the two screws down correct?
I will have to post installation and adjustment details on the blog.

The two allen screws on the face of the EBB are only there to secure the notched plate to the disc that hold the bearings.

This is how the EBB works. Imagine a standard outboard bearing bottom bracket. It is composed of two threaded cups that thread into each side of the bottom bracket shell. Inside of each threaded cup a bearing is pressed in to support the spindle. This product is essentially the same, with one major difference. In this product, each threaded cup contains a disc. The discs are not pressed in, and are free to rotate during adjustment. Each disc has a hole bored into it, offset from the center, containing a bearing. When these discs are rotated in their cups, they throw the crank spindle backward of forward. This positioning sets the chain tension. Once in position, the discs are fixed into position by tightening six set screws located around the perimeter of the threaded cups. Not shown in the photos are the spacer rings that fit between the bearings and the inside faces of the crank arms. They fit into the large holes beneath the two screws on the face of the EBB.

Once the crank arms are on, it would be very difficult to adjust the discs, especially on the drive side with the chainring and chainring spider in the way. So, the design incorporates a large thin disc permanently screwed onto the face of each disc. This disc is wide enough to allow a person's hands to manipulate the disc position by hand, even on the drive side with the cranks attached. You simply place your thumbs and fingers into the notches on the perimeters of the discs, and turn by hand to adjust their positions. Once the chain is tensioned correctly, you tighten the set screws on the threaded cups, and the EBB is ready for use.

It does not slip. The set screws hold the discs in place very securely. The ordinary M5 set screws are easily replaced if they are ever lost or damaged.
 

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fishcreek said:
that would be one on my christmas list for sure. good move on enduro bearings too, i just hope it can be easily serviced without special tools. :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
The only tools needed for adjustment are metric hex keys. The installation tool has two wrench flats that can be manipulated with a 36mm headset wrench. Pressing out the bearings is accomplished with a simple press or basic shop tools.
 

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I hope to build a full susser with a Alfine hub which will require some sort of tension on a standard frame and you just solved that issue for me. Thanks. I hope it works out, it's a great idea.
 

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ernesto_from_Wisconsin said:
my world...just...crumbled...
Just think of the possibilities of running both Eno & eBB - chain tensioning, ride height, steerer angle all becomes adjustable.... ;)

You still need half links and/or a careful selection of chainring/cog combo to get good chain tension with this eBB.
 

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Golden Bears United
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385 Posts
I would certainly be interested when I spring for a new disc wheelset. Right now, I'm running 32x20 magic gear, but could reduce it to 32x18. I haven't done that yet, because that would require a tensioner.
 
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