Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,389 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What cup sizes are youguys primarily using? I know it depends on the angle and room, but what size range?
Also, how do I tell what size I have? Mine are all suffed up so I have no idea if it's written on there or not.
Thanks again
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,491 Posts
I use a big fat one

I use one with about a 3/4" opening that's made for welding titanium (though I don't use it for that very much).

Just like the one Rody has in this blog post:
http://groovycycleworks.blogspot.com/2008/06/feeling-luvti-that-is.html

I never pay attention to the numbers, I just measure the opening to tell what I've got.

-Walt

toddre said:
What cup sizes are youguys primarily using? I know it depends on the angle and room, but what size range?
Also, how do I tell what size I have? Mine are all suffed up so I have no idea if it's written on there or not.
Thanks again
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,849 Posts
I use a 6 (cups are named by the opening size, in 1/16ths of an inch, so 6/16".) and 1/16" Ceriated tungsten. No lens. Never tried one.

For the amperage I run, I don't need anything larger than 1/16, but I'm not building DJ.

Toddre, what issues are you having? 1/16th tungsten probably isn't hurting you.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,491 Posts
Yes.

Gas lenses are SOP for anyone that does a significant amount of TIG, as they allow you to run 1/2 or less the flowrate on your argon. Hence they pay for themselves (I don't even remember what a gas lens costs, but it's not more than $5 or so) in about 10 minutes of welding. My lens is in at all times, I don't even think about it at this point.

They do also help when you have the tungsten way out, but that's not the main benefit. Get one, you'll love it.

-Walt

buildyourown said:
Walt,
Are you using a gas lens on all your steel? I've seen it used for very tight areas where you need to hang the tungsten out 3/4", but never for general use.

To the OP, I use a #7 cup and a 3/32 tung. It looks just like what Groovy works has as his steel setup.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,389 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
D.F.L. said:
Toddre, what issues are you having? 1/16th tungsten probably isn't hurting you.
Really, the only problem I have is my welding skills at this point...:D
In all honesty, it's keeping the welds consistent with good penetration. That's what I'm trying to work on the most (obviously, I guess).
Plus just trying different things as I try to close the welding gap to be able to weld a frame or two on my own.
Two more questions if I may.
What does a larger tungsten get you?
And my welds almost look "pasty" (my camera sux and I can't seem to get a bood pic of it) . Other welds that I see on here look "shinier". Is this due to crappy cleaning and/or the fact I'm using no-name tungsten right now that I bought at Harbor Freight Due to budget)? What does a "quality" tungsten gain you?
Thanks again all for being patient
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Pasty vs shiny?

Sounds like you are overheating your bead (same problem I have). Move hotter/faster?

Regarding gas lenses. I was having alot of black peppar flakes in aluminum welding, started using a gas lens and the black flakes disapeared. I was told the flakes are caused by poor gas coverage. As Walt said, for $5 why use anything else?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,053 Posts
toddre said:
What cup sizes are youguys primarily using? I know it depends on the angle and room, but what size range?
Also, how do I tell what size I have? Mine are all suffed up so I have no idea if it's written on there or not.
Thanks again
Cup size should be determined by tungsten diameter. A good rule of thumb to follow is 3 times the diameter. Cup openings are measured by 1/16th, a 5 is 5/16th,etc.
Set your AR flow @ 12cfh for steel, and 20cfh for Aluminum.
Also try a diamond grinder on your tungsten, it turns the arc into a laser.
Thoriated tungsten is radioactive, so use Lanthanated, it handles the heat as good as Thoriated, and a gas lense keeps turbulence out of your gas shield, thus not sucking any O2 in when you change torch angle.
RTW.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,389 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
rickthewelder said:
Cup size should be determined by tungsten diameter. A good rule of thumb to follow is 3 times the diameter. Cup openings are measured by 1/16th, a 5 is 5/16th,etc.
Set your AR flow @ 12cfh for steel, and 20cfh for Aluminum.
Also try a diamond grinder on your tungsten, it turns the arc into a laser.
Thoriated tungsten is radioactive, so use Lanthanated, it handles the heat as good as Thoriated, and a gas lense keeps turbulence out of your gas shield, thus not sucking any O2 in when you change torch angle.
RTW.
Is the more coverge (within reason) better?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,849 Posts
Larger tungsten allows you to run higher amperages for heavier work. I like the 1/16 better than the 3/32. It will give you a little more room for tungstem when working in tight areas. Not a big deal, probably.

A dull grey finish indicates that you're using too much heat and oxygen is getting to your weld while it's still quite hot. Most beginner welders are unsure and tend to weld too slowly, lingering over their puddles. Practise and experience will help make this go away. As you gain composure, you'll be better able to anticipate and react to what's happening. And your speed will increase, even as you're using less power to achieve better results.

Some recommend using a pulser, but when I was learning, the pulser just seemed to increase the pressure I felt. Manually pulsing is great, but it's still best to have a bunch of hours under your belt before you start messing with it.

Work on keeping your tungsten very close to your work. As you get further away, the puddle tends to enlarge. Work on keeping your torch close to 90 deg to the surface. It's easy to let the cup get angled as you work your way around a tube, and when it gets too close to tangent, the gas flow will draw oxygen in from the back side. Work on getting nice, tight fits and make sure that you have sufficient vent holes.

We can give you tips all day, and they will help you, but be patient and let your skills improve.
 

·
Non Dual Bliss
Joined
·
6,240 Posts
3/32 lets the tungsten run cooler for frame building purposes. A cooler tungsten decrease the impacts of dipping your tungsten in the work, getting a globule sticking to it, or breaking it if you should freeze it in the puddle. These are facts of life for any tig welder, you just experience it a lot less often as you get more proficient.

IMO, one of the most important steps to a good tig weld is a good tungsten prep & grind. Dedicated diamond wheel only. Do not use your diamond wheel to remove tungsten contamination, use it only for finishing your point. Blank the end of your tungsten when you're done so you have a 5 thou flat on the end of it. If your tungsten gets even a little contamination on it, stop what you're doing and address it. Google search tungsten grinding for what your grind should look like if you don't know.

Run a gas lens. The diameter of your cup is the limiting factor on how much tungsten stick out you can run. General rule of thumb is your stick out can be up to one cup diameter. Don't run any more stick out than you have to. Lack of argon coverage is a bad, bad thing. Any porosity in your weld makes it a tosser. On a steel frame you can't grind out the damage and make it better. You can't reweld it. It's screwed, don't even try to salvage it. Well at least don't try to salvage it and call yourself a craftsman. Porosity in your weld means you thrown those tubes/frame away.

Grey, wormy, welds are from overheating or starving the joint of filler; either reduce your amperage, increase your travel speed, or add more filler. Your welds on steel should be salmon colored, even in appearance, with no undercut and no cold lapping. Use this picture of Carl Strong's welding for your goal:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,389 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
You know, there that other "frame building forum" that I skim over once in awhile. It's filled with great info, but if you ask basic questions like mine, you get raked over the freakin' coals.
I want to say thanks to everyone here who is patient, helpful and doesn't treat you like an idiot who isn't qualified to do this.
You guys are great.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,825 Posts
That 'other forum' banned me because I had an opinion that Don and Neil did not agree with. A real couple of douchebags. Turns out that they have banned lots of people for challenging their notions.

I like it here. Playing rough and having fun. Also, the folks here think free'r.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top