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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Whats up guys & gals,

New to the forum - on here seeking some help and opinions.

I currently live in Orlando, FL and really enjoy the trails in Central FL....for a flat state, we have some pretty awesome stuff to ride.

I'm going to be moving out to UTAH next year and wanted to buy a bike that will be a fit for some of the riding I plan to do out there.

I've sold my Specialized XC Pro, and I'm looking for a bike with longer travel.

My budget is between 2500 and 3000, and I have narrowed it down to the Kona Process 134, and the Trek Remedy 7 (650b).

I am absolutely STUCK on this decision. Unfortunately, here in FL, no one carries AM bikes. I have called every trek dealer in the state, and no one has a Remedy of any kind. And as for Kona, I've found a few Precept DL's, but not a Process anywhere in site. So I have to make this decision with no demo, or even the chance to sit on the bikes.

The Kona Process 134 is $2600, and the Trek Remedy 7 is $2834, but I have a buddy at the Trek dealer that can get it to me for $2414.

Need ya'lls help to decide. Below are the spec lists. I think the spec for the Remedy is pretty damn good for 2400 bucks...most of all the front and rear shocks are solid. On the other hand the Process has been getting rave reviews......not so much raving on the remedy....and I dig the process comes with the dropper post...but unfortunately, I'm not to excited about the front/rear shocks.

The Bike Mag Bike Bible Guys seem to really vote for the Process.... but I'm having a hard time giving up what seems like better components and more technology in the Remedy.

Anyone with experience with these bikes/brands, or some guidance would be most appreciated!

Here are the specs:

Trek Remedy 7 - $2414 from my friend at the dealer

FramesetFrame

Alpha Platinum Aluminum, ABP Convert, Full Floater, E2 tapered head tube, press fit BB, internal derailleur & dropper post routing, magnesium EVO Link, ISCG 05 mount, downtube armor, Mino Link, 140mm travel


Front suspension

RockShox Revelation RL w/Solo Air, rebound, lockout, E2 tapered steerer, 15mm Maxle Lite, 140mm travel


Rear suspension

Fox Evolution Series Float w/DRCV, CTD (climb-trail-descend) damper, rebound, tuned by Trek in California, 7.75x2.25"


Sizes

15.5, 17.5, 18.5, 19.5, 21.5"



WheelsWheels

Bontrager alloy, 15mm alloy axle front hub; Bontrager sealed cartridge bearing rear hub w/Bontrager Duster 28-hole Tubeless Ready rims


Tires

Bontrager XR3 Expert, aramid bead, 27.5x2.35"



DrivetrainShifters

Shimano Deore, 10 speed


Front derailleur

Shimano Deore, high direct mount


Rear derailleur

Shimano SLX Shadow Plus


Crank

Shimano M622, 40/30/22


Cassette

Shimano HG62 11-36, 10 speed



ComponentsSaddle

Bontrager Evoke 2, chromoly rails


Seatpost

Bontrager SSR, 31.6mm, 12mm offset


Handlebar

Bontrager Low Riser, 31.8mm, 15mm rise


Stem

Bontrager Rhythm Comp, 31.8mm, 0 degree


Headset

FSA IS-2, E2, sealed cartridge bearing


Brakeset

Shimano M615 hydraulic disc



AccessoriesGrips

Bontrager Rhythm, dual lock-on




Kona Process $2600 - haven't tried to negotiate

FRAME MATERIALKona 6061 Aluminum Butted 134mm Travel
SIZESS, M, L, XL
REAR SHOCKRockShox Monarch R
FORKRockShox Sektor Silver Air 140mm QR15 Tapered
CRANKARMSShimano Deore
CHAINRINGS24/38t
B/BShimano Press Fit 92
PEDALSn/a
CHAINKMC X10
FREEWHEELShimano Deore 11-36t 10 spd
CHAINGUIDEn/a
F/DSram X5
R/DShimano SLX Shadow Plus
SHIFTERSShimano Deore
BRAKE CALIPERSShimano M505
FRONT BRAKE ROTORShimano 180mm (centerlock)
REAR BRAKE ROTORShimano 160mm (centerlock)
BRAKE LEVERSShimano M505
HEADSETFSA Orbit 1.5 ZS No.57B
HANDLEBARKona XC/BC Riser
STEMKona 40mm
SEATPOSTKS Eten R
SEAT CLAMPKona Clamp
GRIPSKona S-LOG
SADDLEWTB Volt Sport SE
FRONT HUBShimano Deore QR15
REAR HUBShimano Deore 142x12mm
SPOKESStainless 14g
RIMSWTB SX23
FRONT TIREMaxxis Ardent 27.5x2.25"
REAR TIREMaxxis Ardent 27.5x2.25"
PAINT COLORMatt Black & Yellow
EXTRASn/a

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Hi there, that's a tough call ! I would probably go Trek, just because in central Florida I think it would be easier to get serviced for any issues (Pure speculation).
I'm here in Orlando as well and for parts and service I went with a Stumpjumper FSR, ask if maybe they can order one of them without having you have to buy it just in case you don't like it ?
 

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The Kona comes with a dropper and the Trek comes with that rear end and better all around suspension at that price point with the DRCV valving on the rear and a Revelation fork. The Trek will come with slightly and I mean maybe not enough to notice better brakes, but the Kona has a better caliper set up for when you decide to upgrade.

I've ridden both as rentals and here's what I think. Since you will be riding in Utah next year, either of these bikes will do you well. The Process at this price point is heavy as hell. It really shines at a higher component level with a lot of dropped weight. At any component weight, the Kona is unremarkable at slower speeds and with really slow techy stuff that you have to pick through. At speed headed downhill, this may be one of the best all mountain bikes on the market bar none. I'm talking ludicrous here. Handles great with a deceptively steep head angle and super short chainstays. Absolutely rails banked turns with that stiff as f*** rear end. But at this price point, the suspension is not as good as the sick frame. But it does come with a dropper post which you will definitely need in Utah.

The Trek is one of my favorite bikes out there. The suspension is a level above the Kona's with the Revelation and the DRCV custom valving on the CTD shock. Plus the rear end helps this bike climb like a mountain goat. I mean like a freaking goat. The rear valving plus the rear end makes all the difference in the world. There is no brake jack bottoming out entering corners going up or down, the rear stays glued to the ground. The rear is easily pumped going up to give you a little extra push to get over that square edged ledge you will be climbing.

I may get shot for this, but I like the tires a bit more than the proven Ardents on the Kona and here's why. The Bontragers can lean through corners like nobody's business. No unwanted slipping and the rolling resistance is pretty good for this width. The Ardents have better grip in the middle and out on the edge. But in between those knob regions of the tire is an area where you don't get grip at all. You slide out. you either have to take a corner standing straight up with no lean or leaned all the way over. If the corner requires you to lean only a certain amount, you are **** out of luck. I'll take the Bontrager's still solid performance for that reason alone.

Both are great bikes. But I'd pick the Trek for great all around performance versus the insane downhill but lackluster flat and climbing on the Kona due to weight at this component level. At a higher price point that could change, but for your budget, the Trek is the better bike, IMO.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hey Erik - Kyles bike shop in Downtown Orlando is an Kona Dealer, so I think service should be fine. I would totally consider a specialized, but I have my heart set on a 650b and right now that is not an option with them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Mr Mentallo - awesome post bro, thanks for all that info! Your first hand opinion having ridden both bikes is like gold. I have 2 follow up questions for you:

1) a lot of the reviews on the remedy said that the bike just felt a little awkward to ride....not confidence inspiring. And others said the remedy cockpit felt small and cramped and many people had to upsize to a larger frame to be comfortable - did you experience this, or would you agree?

2). I have had a thought of possibly blowing my budget and stretching for the $3600 for the Process DL - which has better components all around and better shocks (still rockshox, but better....especially the Revelation front fork). If we were considering the process DL with the upgrades, would your opinion still be the same as you stated above?

again, thanks. Your insight is super appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Nauc - I definitely see the logic in that, but I just sold all
My bikes for this.....and I don't want to Not ride for the next 9 months before I get to Utah.
 

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I was going to say wait until you get here, too -- we have lots of bikes available for sale, and you never know what kind of riding you're going to do once here. We have lots of steep long rocky downhill trails, XC rides, resorts, etc., so often one bike isn't enough anyway. For what it is worth, virtually everyone I ride with regularly rides a 160 mm AM bike -- Enduros, Slayers, Reign X's, Nomads, stuff like that. Lots of trails (most, maybe) where you pedal uphill for an hour and then want to rip the down as fast as you can, which is why we all opt for a slightly 'bigger,' more aggressive bike.

I have no input on those bikes, other than I've found most bikes made by good companies seem to work as intended. I love my Enduro, but can't really say it is 'better' in any regard than its competitors. We all get to the top and to the bottom about the same time, regardless of the names on the downtubes.

Good luck, and don't stress out too much about it!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I was going to say wait until you get here, too -- we have lots of bikes available for sale, and you never know what kind of riding you're going to do once here. We have lots of steep long rocky downhill trails, XC rides, resorts, etc., so often one bike isn't enough anyway. For what it is worth, virtually everyone I ride with regularly rides a 160 mm AM bike -- Enduros, Slayers, Reign X's, Nomads, stuff like that. Lots of trails (most, maybe) where you pedal uphill for an hour and then want to rip the down as fast as you can, which is why we all opt for a slightly 'bigger,' more aggressive bike.


I have no input on those bikes, other than I've found most bikes made by good companies seem to work as intended. I love my Enduro, but can't really say it is 'better' in any regard than its competitors. We all get to the top and to the bottom about the same time, regardless of the names on the downtubes.


Good luck, and don't stress out too much about it!
i think you did it a little back assward. buy a klunker until you get to utah
Ya, I think I may have done this a little backwards......especially since I have now sold my XC bike and road bike....so I have nada.

My situation is I'm an ICU Nurse here in Orlando, FL (so making money right now).....and I'm heading out to Salt Lake to do a 2.5 year Nurse Anesthesia program (full time student = no income) - so since I have some cash flow right now, I was trying to get everything taken care of now...and live the life of a poor student for those two years....but with a rig I could have a blast with on the weekends. At this point....I could just bank this cash and wait 12 months.....but that would be no riding unless I rented a bike for the rest of my Florida life....and that is super lamesauce.

The one upside to making the purchase in FL is I have this connection at the Trek Dealer, so I can get the Friends and Family price....which is about 15% discount (thats 450 bucks on a 3k bike....so pretty nice deal)

Back to the bikes.....since I'll be a student on limited funds, multiple bikes will not be an option, so I was looking for a do it all bike. It can be a little longer travel, since flat XC riding/racing I'm not really into......trail/tech trail/ I love....and would like to get into a little Enduro/All mountain stuff...but I'm new to it. I'm an ex-BMXer....so I'm a drop your seat low and jump off every little bump I can find kinda guy.

I figured the Process 134 was kind of a do it all bike. But perhaps I would be better suited to look at a longer travel bike like the Trek Slash (160mm) - I could get the 15% discount on that as well.

After thinking about this, I think I'll will up my max price to around 3500. Which will make the Process DL a possibility....and all those awesome reviews are just do damn temping....everyone seems to love the thing. But its tough to spend 3600 on a Process DL.....when I can get a Remedy or Slash for 2400 or 2900 with much better specs.

Someone just make the damn decision for me......I just want to buy a bike and be done with it lol
 

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First, a premature welcome to Utah! The riding here in Salt Lake is outstanding, and you're going to LOVE it once you get used to the altitude. Will you be studying at the U? I study there, and my wife works at the U hospital. Hit me up when you get here and I'll show you around the trails.

I know you've narrowed it down to those two models, but I feel compelled to suggest a few other bikes in your price range. Even with your Trek discount, you could do better in my opinion. And Kona has had a less than stellar history for the past few years with frame breakages and flexy rear ends. Anyway, I'd strongly recommend a bike like the Santa Cruz Bronson aluminum, the Giant Trance 275, or the Santa Cruz Heckler 27.5. They've got more travel (everyone here seems to have 5+ inches of travel for the trails we have), and the shops here that sell/service those brands are excellent. But those bikes, in my opinion, would be far better than the Trek or the Kona. Just my opinion
 

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Mr Mentallo - awesome post bro, thanks for all that info! Your first hand opinion having ridden both bikes is like gold. I have 2 follow up questions for you:

1) a lot of the reviews on the remedy said that the bike just felt a little awkward to ride....not confidence inspiring. And others said the remedy cockpit felt small and cramped and many people had to upsize to a larger frame to be comfortable - did you experience this, or would you agree?

2). I have had a thought of possibly blowing my budget and stretching for the $3600 for the Process DL - which has better components all around and better shocks (still rockshox, but better....especially the Revelation front fork). If we were considering the process DL with the upgrades, would your opinion still be the same as you stated above?

again, thanks. Your insight is super appreciated.
No problem. Yeah the Remedy was a bit small. But nothing switching a few parts around wouldn't fix. I'm 5'10" and usually ride a medium. I was a bit cramped in the cockpit at first.( He said cockpit hehehe) They were ready for this and promptly switched out to a longer stem as the leg reach was fine. I do prefer a bit smaller of a bike since I like to muscle mine around and the reduced size helps a bit. I had no problems with stability whatsoever. Just the opposite. Stability was a major strength for me. For someone to find this bike unstable or awkward is puzzling since I thought it fit like a glove.

The Process DL is a great bike. Better than both of your other choices. Both of the others will still do the job and be a blast as they are both good bikes. If you are thinking of going to that price point for a Process DL, I would also look at a Devinci Troy XP. Less than the DL but near the same component level. Plus it comes with a Rockshox Pike, the best fork on the market right now. I would ride that one stock except for the brakes. Even with a brake upgrade, you are still looking at less. There is a Devinci dealer in Clearwater so you can look at and hopefully ride one.

Out of what you have said, I would save the money and get the Trek. That's just me though. I would think hard about the Devinci Troy XP though.
 

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I recommend you don't buy anything until you get here. There are TONS of great used bikes here within your budget, you'll get a lot more bike for your money if you buy 2 years old than if you buy new. $5k bike in 2012 is $3k now.

You'll be sucking gas on the climbs for a while as you adjust to both LONG CLIMBS, and elevation, that you are not used to.

One of the other big things is because you are a flatlander, you have no idea what kind of "downhill" ride you dig. So buying a bike before you know THAT is really putting the cart before the horse.

Do you like riding the chairlift and bombing downhill? Do you like 60 mile XC rides? How about 2-4 hour loops? All very different, we have all of that and more here in Utah.

If you like to earn your vert' then you don't want to get something like a Nomad. Or if you get here and really love the downhills that you never had in Florida, you'll feel out gunned on a 3-4" travel XC Rig while guys are flying past you on 6-8" travel bikes.

You really don't know what you don't know yet, which is why I suggest you wait.
 

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If you like to earn your vert' then you don't want to get something like a Nomad. Or if you get here and really love the downhills that you never had in Florida, you'll feel out gunned on a 3-4" travel XC Rig while guys are flying past you on 6-8" travel bikes.
Hey, we occasionally 'earn our vert' on 6" bikes! Since the bike is heavier, we really earn it! Of course, we don't do anything silly like climb up the Crest -- there's a shuttle for that, after all! -- but you'll find me pedaling up the back side of Jacobs Ladder, Arcylon, Bobsled, etc. Of course, I'm often passed on the uphill by someone earning their vert quite a bit more quickly than I am, but honestly I don't know how much to blame on the bike or my body. But no one passes me on the downhill side!

Just messin' with you. To the OP, if you haven't ridden out here before, the variety will blow you away.

Of course, people do get a little carried away on bike selection. You can ride just about any bike up or down just about any trail you want. Heck (a Utah word!), I found myself riding down the Wasatch Crest on my wife's old GT Avalanche hardtail last summer (22 miles of smooth/rocky/fast/techy trail with 5500 feet elevation loss) and having a great time doing it (long story short, a relative was in town and I wanted him to try my Enduro). So it isn't like you'll show up with whatever you have and you won't be able to ride. You will and you'll have a blast.

It is just unavoidable that after a year or 2 out here, you'll gravitate to one type of riding and probably want a bike more tailored to that. But at this point, you can't know what you'll like.

So my advice would be to buy a reasonable bike that you like and can easily afford, ride that in Florida, bring it out to Utah and spend a few months riding it until you decide what kind of bike you REALLY want!
 

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Hey, we occasionally 'earn our vert' on 6" bikes! Of course, we don't do anything silly like climb up the Crest ...
I do :) I pedal my beloved Canfield (8") up the Crest all the time. It just takes me a long time. It's not exactly enjoyable, but I don't think I'd enjoy it on a 18lb xc hardtail either. I just like going down things more than going up them, I guess. The quality of the down is 10000% worth the little bit extra effort on the way up with a big bike.

Btw, we should get a big MTBR Utard ride of the Crest together sometime. It'd be really cool to put faces to the names.
 

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when I was skinny in 1997 I rode from Ft. Union to the top of puke hill, then back down Mill Creek. Now just puke hill is enough punishment for my 50yo body
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
You guys rock, thanks so much for all the input.

Having no bike to ride in Florida will suck so I definitely don't want to do that.... But what I'm getting from all this is that I want to buy a bike that's at least moderately capable for Utah, ride for a little while once I get there and then figure out what I like and go from there. More importantly I want to have a bike that has good resale potential so that if I want to sell it and switch to something different i'll be able to do that and get my money back out of it fairly easily. Also... I'm going to want to buy something at a bit of a discount so if I resell it I won't lose too much.

I've decided I want to max out at 3k for now.

With that said the two bikes that I can get a discount on are the Santa Cruz Bronson Aluminum R-AM and the Trek Remedy 8. I confirmed I can get either one for around 3000 which is a three or four hundred below sticker, so that gives me a small resale buffer if needed.

Both bikes look pretty comparable to each other suspension wise both with Fox CTD, and dual pivot setups. The remedy specs out a tad bit better, but Bronson has gotten good reviews. Bronson will be a lot of travel for riding here in Florida at 150mm, but the VPP rear end seems to manage that pretty well.

You guys have any idea which will have the better resale out in Utah?

charging_rhinos - i'll definitely hit you up when I get out there man, would love to ride, thanks for the invite!
 
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