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I have been researching ways to determine my AT (simple ways). I have seen everything from 2 x 20 test, concori(??), and 60 min TT and/or 40k TT. Most of these descriptions tend to point toward performing these test on trainer or road bike.

1st question - I completed a 10 mile mountainbike TT on fairly flat but very twisty course in 51 min. at avg heart rate of 181. Could this be considered my AT. If so that seems high to me.

2nd question - Out of the test mentioned above which to you prefer and do you have any other ideas. I have a computrainer that I havent set up yet so I would like to also find my wattage at AT.

Thanks for any help. BK
 

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paintbucket
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I'm sorry, but with questions like this you will not be allowed to ride the OC Tour next year. Sign up for the race and let those of us who think good ride prep is stopping after the first six pack the night before have a chance for glory. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Man

oh man!! I'm not training for the OC but for 1.5 to 2 hr races. The OC I just have to wing!!

Plus, Since I couldnt ever catch you last year I figured I better step up my game!!! See ya BK
 

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There are several different concepts of "threshold." You're probably best off thinking of it as the effort you can maintain for approximately one hour.

Heart rate is only a very approximate measure of threshold. There are many factors that will affect it, making the task of identifying a specific heartrate that corresponds to threshold very difficult. For example, your "threshold heartrate" is probably higher on the trail than it would be on the road, since you use a greater percentage of your musculature when on the trail. In addition, heart rate is slow to respond to increased or decreased efforts, so a "steady" heart rate might not reflect very stochastic efforts. Not to mention the effects of caffeine, fatigue, heat, dehydration, etc.

Since you have a computrainer, you can probably find a fairly accurate power measurement at threshold. If you pay close attention to how you feel at that effort (and watch your heartrate to some extent), you can transfer that effort to your outdoor riding.

The average power of 2X20 min. test (2 to 5 min. rest interval) should work well to estimate threshold. The shorter time frame helps remedy the lack of motivation that often accompanies riding inside.
 

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AT - different def

back from my nordic racing days, I seem to recall that a very rough AT could be calc'd as 200 minus your age, so I would be 200-35 = 165.

I believe that AT is the heartrate above which you can not sustain effort( possibly beyond 1 hr, I can't remember). basically AT and V02max are related in that they have to do with the volume of oxygen that can be consumed, and then pumped to your muscles at a rate that prevents the build-up of lactic acid.

Iktome said:
There are several different concepts of "threshold." You're probably best off thinking of it as the effort you can maintain for approximately one hour.

Heart rate is only a very approximate measure of threshold. There are many factors that will affect it, making the task of identifying a specific heartrate that corresponds to threshold very difficult. For example, your "threshold heartrate" is probably higher on the trail than it would be on the road, since you use a greater percentage of your musculature when on the trail. In addition, heart rate is slow to respond to increased or decreased efforts, so a "steady" heart rate might not reflect very stochastic efforts. Not to mention the effects of caffeine, fatigue, heat, dehydration, etc.

Since you have a computrainer, you can probably find a fairly accurate power measurement at threshold. If you pay close attention to how you feel at that effort (and watch your heartrate to some extent), you can transfer that effort to your outdoor riding.

The average power of 2X20 min. test (2 to 5 min. rest interval) should work well to estimate threshold. The shorter time frame helps remedy the lack of motivation that often accompanies riding inside.
 

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mtbkendall said:
I have been researching ways to determine my AT (simple ways). I have seen everything from 2 x 20 test, concori(??), and 60 min TT and/or 40k TT. Most of these descriptions tend to point toward performing these test on trainer or road bike.

1st question - I completed a 10 mile mountainbike TT on fairly flat but very twisty course in 51 min. at avg heart rate of 181. Could this be considered my AT. If so that seems high to me.

2nd question - Out of the test mentioned above which to you prefer and do you have any other ideas. I have a computrainer that I havent set up yet so I would like to also find my wattage at AT.

Thanks for any help. BK
1: I have had rides where my average heart rate is above my LT, sustainable HR. At City Park in Austin, TX I used to see that all the time. My average would be about 5 or 6 beats above what I could do in steady state riding.

2. I like a single 20 minute interval. That should give you a power reading about 3-5% higher than your real threshold. Alternatively, I can get a pretty accurate estimation by doing a 5 minute test, which gives an average power 15% above my threshold. It's really mentally hard to sustain threshold effort for very long unless I'm in a race, so I like shorter tests.

Bonus: I've found heart my rate at LT to move around quite a bit depending on temperature, mood, tiredness and nutrition, so trying to plan workouts around hitting specific heart rate targets hasn't worked very well.

edit: I'm using LT and AT as the same thing, i.e. Functional Threshold Power, which is commonly defined as the average power you can make for a 60 min TT.
 
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