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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Scanning the forum, I did not find an answer... Can someone point me to a reference or answer what the difference is in the terms listed in the title of this thread. From my understanding, AM v. XC is that you DON'T want the AM if you weight and speed are top priorities, and you DON'T want the XC if you're into big drops that really punish the bike. My conclusion is that if I'm satisfied with the weight of the AM, or trust the durability of the XC, them I'm justsplitting hairs. Does climbing ability or any other quality come into play?

I hear XC and XTR bantered about when saying that a certain component is really for one type of bike or another. What does XTR stand for?

Thanks fellas,
agomez:D
 

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Typically an XC (cross country) bike will climb much more efficiently than an AM (all mountain) bike. You've got your terms straight for the most part, in that XC bikes are made to be fast and light, whereas AM bikes are a bit beefier and are designed to absorb some bigger hits.

XC and XTR are related only in the sense that you can put Shimano XTR parts on your XC bike (or any bike you want, but they're intended for mountain bikes). XTR is Shimano's upper level equipment line for mountain bikes. For example, you'd get XTR shifters, XTR derailleurs, pedals, etc. XT, which may be what you mistook for XC in this case, is one step below XTR. If you take, in ascending order, part of Shimano's component group would go: Deore, LX, XT, XTR.

If you're familiar with SRAM you'll notice similar order that compares to Shimano. For Shimano's LX, XT, and XTR, SRAM's parts go X-5, X-7, and X-9, with X-9 competing with Shimano's XTR line.

I hope that clears it up for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Excellent! thanks to all! I didn't know the importance of the AM/XC issue since I was getting wishy washy answers from a local lbs.

Thanks again!
 

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Really, XT-R comes from XT (the previous top of the shimano line, some years back), with the R standing for racing.

They tend to be superlight parts, but die a little quickly if you really punish them - making them ideal for XC racing, but not too clever for AM or DH riding.
 
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