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biking is fun
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So first off i never post in here cause i mainly ride FR/DH. For my "light" wheelset i run maxxis advantages and love them. i thought that they would work just as good for her but they are pretty heavy so now im trying to lighten her bike.

she went from a kona dawg with 2.1 kenda nevegals to her new transition syren with 2.4 maxxis advantages

im considering a 2.1 nevegal rear and 2.35 nevegal front. Anyone else running this combo? it would lose over 300 grams of rotational mass and would help her complaint of her new bike feeling sluggish.

would 2.1 rear and 2.35 front feel weird? it seems like the 2.35 is huge but i haven't compared them to the 2.1's before.

any input would be appreciated.
 

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biking is fun
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
locustfist said:
what is the dirt like you're riding on?
i live in utah so most of the time its anywhere from hardpack to loose and dusty. we also have the rocky terrain in st george and moab.

I want the DTC ones cause they are lighter and wear better.

she liked the 2.1's but we are moving her to the bigger bike 6" rear and 6.3" front. she is getting faster too. i was thinking dual 2.35's but was thinking we could get away with the 2.1 on the rear for added weight loss.

either way the Maxxis Advantages weigh about 840 grams, the 2.35 nevegals weigh 700 and the 2.1 weigh 600. thats a good amount of weight off and she could again pedal uphill better.
 

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I dig trails!
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climbingbubba said:
her complaint of her new bike feeling sluggish.
The sluggishness can be the weight but is most likely the rolling resistance.

Most riders confuse slow tires with weight.

I run a 900g Schwable Big Betty up front and it rolls better than all 600g tires I've had on the bike. Spin it up and throw the endless momentum into the next hill. Rolling resistance is with you ALL the time, while weight is only a factor during accelerations - and even then usually only from stop to speed.

For simplicity, choose any Schwable tire that fits her riding style/conditions for low rolling resistance. Alternatives include Intense System 4 standard (rear), dual compound (front), Michelin Dry2.

The Nevegals are some of the slowest rolling (but better gripping) tires you can choose. Kenda makes great grippy, but slow rolling rubber. (that includes the Small Block 8)

P
 

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2 minutes turkish
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similar to what we ride in so cal then

on my 6" bike

winter (hard pack/sticky clay) ::
Back - 2.35 Kenda Small Block 8
Front - 2.5 Weirwolf LT


Summer (loose over hard pack)
Back - 2.35 Kenda Blue Groove
Front - 2.5 Kenda Nevagal


although I think I will regular weirwolf on the front next summer....faster than the nev
 

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biking is fun
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
ill have to look into the intense system 4's. i love intense tires. im putting a 2.5 intense 909 FRO front and either a 909 or dh 2.35 FRO on the rear of my new socom.

i never thought about the difference of rolling resistance VS weight.

like i mentioned though it is pretty loose around here so grip is pretty important
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
hmm.. lots to think about. she is only 5'4 and weighs 125 so she is pretty small.

maybe ill try it and see what happens.

any more suggestions? her bike weighs 34.1 pounds right now. its a AM/FR girl specific bike. she is starting to hit some small gappers (3-5 foot doubles). getting her bike a little lighter would help her for the uphills which she enjoys for some crazy reason!?!
 

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Dirt Deviant
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I ran the nevegal 2.1 rear and 2.35 front for the better part of this year and it worked out great. Ended up going with a 2.35 Excavator in the rear now.
The nevegal is a great tire, but if rolling resistance is an issue for her maybe try the DTC Nevegal in the rear. It's harder rubber on the middle part of the tread and sticky on the edges. Reduces resistance. I haven't tried em yet, but plan on it this summer.
Sticky front, and DTC rear.
 

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Nevegals are great tires, though they are pretty wide tires for their sizing. A 2.35 Nevegal sits a fair bit wider on the rim than an equivalent Maxxis Highroller. Depending on what rims she is using this might mean that a 2.1 will be more than enough especially in the back as mentioned above. I would look into Maxxis Highrolers as well though, in the 2.30 sizing. They grip well in the loose and have a fairly low rolling resistance.
 

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Don't mean to jum p in here as Mr.Negative, but in one of your replies it says "she liked the 2.1's but we are moving her to the bigger bike 6" rear and 6.3" front". I'm curious was this we're as in you and your wifes decission to change bikes, or did hubby decide it suited her better? Just curious is all, because from your description she may very much enjoy and not mind loosing some DH ability for a better climbing experience and sticking with the Dawg might have been the right move for her.

Tyre wise Mr.P has it right, big difference between weight and rolling resistance. Fav tyre of all the guys when I visit Colorado is the Schwalbe Big Betty GooEE compund, but I think that with your wife's weight she could prob get away with a normal version (if they make it). You could check with [email protected] High Cyclery, he had them on special when I was there not sure if that's still on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
ill admit it was me who wanted to change her to a bigger bike. The reasoning is we shuttle 50% of the time. we went to whistler for a week, we ride the local resort, and now she is getting into jumping. She isn't the typical wife who bikes every once in a while. she goes a few times a week with me and rips faster than my dad and brother. she loves the new bike except for the climb up. and lightening the bike should help all around.

ill do some more research into other tires.
the high rollers are about the same weight as the advantages. i know rolling resistance is important but i want to lighten the bike a little too.
 

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What's the build on the bike? Remember she's only 125lbs so she doesn't need what your normal 185+lber would need - wheels don't need to be as burly and that's the place to lose weight and feel it. Are you running tubes or set up tubeless? That's another place to lose some weight. Not sure what your budget is like, but I personally witnessed a Knolly Endo in size Sm weigh in @ 28.5lbs if I remember correctly and that had a fairly serious AM build on it.

climbingbubba said:
ill admit it was me who wanted to change her to a bigger bike. The reasoning is we shuttle 50% of the time. we went to whistler for a week, we ride the local resort, and now she is getting into jumping. She isn't the typical wife who bikes every once in a while. she goes a few times a week with me and rips faster than my dad and brother. she loves the new bike except for the climb up. and lightening the bike should help all around.

ill do some more research into other tires.
the high rollers are about the same weight as the advantages. i know rolling resistance is important but i want to lighten the bike a little too.
 

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obi1 said:
WTB mutanorapters are the lightest 2.4's on the market i believe ( pretty close anyways) and the are crazy grippy even tho they really arnt 2.4's:thumbsup:
:thumbsup: They are fast too!!! With the center ridge they really roll well, a lot better than the motoraptors I was running. I run a 2.5 Weirwolf up front and am very happy with the combination (they work well tubeless too !!) I noticed a considerable speed difference when I switched. They make the Kenda's feel really slow, at least in our terrain, and no grip problems.
 

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biking is fun
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
LyNx said:
What's the build on the bike? Remember she's only 125lbs so she doesn't need what your normal 185+lber would need - wheels don't need to be as burly and that's the place to lose weight and feel it. Are you running tubes or set up tubeless? That's another place to lose some weight. Not sure what your budget is like, but I personally witnessed a Knolly Endo in size Sm weigh in @ 28.5lbs if I remember correctly and that had a fairly serious AM build on it.
Ok ill post up the build and here is a bad pic of it

2009 transition syren with 2009 dhx air
2007 fox talas 36
sun SOS rims laced to hope pro 2 hubs and dt swiss super comp spokes, dt swiss rws rear skewer 10mm
maxxis advantages 2.4 with XC tubes.
avid juicy 7 brakes with 7 inch rotors
wtb deva saddle with ti rails
sette seatpost
truvativ stylo cranks
atomlab trailking pedals (she loves flat pedals)
x9 rear der
x7 shifters (likes the dials)
sram 990 cassette 11-32t
easton monkeylite XC carbon 31.8 bars
odi moab grips
thomson x4 31.8 stem 50mm

well that sums it up.
 

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biking is fun
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
again though, she is getting more and more into freeride but still enjoys the uphill so the width was nice but something lighter would help the overall feel of the bike. i figured asking the AM crowd cause what a 185 pound man uses for aggressive AM should work perfect for a 125 girl who is doing light freeride.
 
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