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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Even given that to a significant extent you have to train around your schedule, your specific physiology, etc., my approach seems to be at huge variance from the "norm" -- enough to worry me somewhat. Here's my status:
- Live in an area where I can ride year round and have ST on our property
- Masters (60) mountain bike racer
- Racing 10 years and typically race 12-15 events per year from early March - early Nov.
- Retired --- have plenty of time for training.
- Do not and will never again train on the road.
- 5'10" and 135 pounds (year round weight -- down from 172 8 years ago)
- Eat an exceptionally healthy diet -- cholesterol = 138
- Blessed with a wife who sometimes races and trains regularly with me.
Typical training week:
Monday -- 2 hour easy zone 1-2 ride on dirt roads.
Tuesday -- off
Wednesday -- Dirt crit with buddies -- 20 minute warmup, 35-50 minutes steady state at LT+, 20 minute cooldown.
Thursday -- off bike but hiking, trail maintenance, or flat water kayaking.
Friday -- Intervals either on my home trail (1/3 mile steep non technical climb) or on our Kettler Ergo Racer (measures wattage and everything else you could need).
Saturday -- fun ride on technical trails (off if racing Sunday or very very light ride)
Sunday -- Racing or dirt crit again (see Wednesday).
Stretching and light weights are worked in 2-3 times per week.
What concerns me is that I do this year round and have for many years. TT's and dirt crit times show that I'm faster than 5 years ago....but at 60 is this too much?? I really feel that I need the intensity to stay at a good fitness level -- it seems that old guys don't get a high level of fitness back too quickly after losing it. I can't imagine the up and down, up and down, weight and fitness levels that so many folks go through with the "seasons." I just try and maintain my level throughout the year and, no, I don't suffer from burnout...but I'm constantly being told that what I'm doing is "wrong" and contrary to virtually all training theory. I'd appreciate any comments.
Thanks!
 

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2012 Race: April 28th!
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Here's my status:
- Live in an area where I can ride year round and have ST on our property
- Masters (60) mountain bike racer
- Racing 10 years and typically race 12-15 events per year from early March - early Nov.
- Retired --- have plenty of time for training.
- Do not and will never again train on the road.
- 5'10" and 135 pounds (year round weight -- down from 172 8 years ago)
- Eat an exceptionally healthy diet -- cholesterol = 138
- Blessed with a wife who sometimes races and trains regularly with me.
Typical training week:
Monday -- 2 hour easy zone 1-2 ride on dirt roads.
Tuesday -- off
Wednesday -- Dirt crit with buddies -- 20 minute warmup, 35-50 minutes steady state at LT+, 20 minute cooldown.
Thursday -- off bike but hiking, trail maintenance, or flat water kayaking.
Friday -- Intervals either on my home trail (1/3 mile steep non technical climb) or on our Kettler Ergo Racer (measures wattage and everything else you could need).
Saturday -- fun ride on technical trails (off if racing Sunday or very very light ride)
Sunday -- Racing or dirt crit again (see Wednesday).
Stretching and light weights are worked in 2-3 times per week.

I want to be you!! :p Sounds like you're enjoying a well deserved retirement. I'm not qualified to comment on your program other than to say I hope I can be that active when I'm 60!
Do you find many XC races with a 60+ age group?
 

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I think the idea of a periodized yearly plan is that you'll be faster during the times when you want to, but the downside is that you'll also be slower at certain times compared to a steady state training like you're doing.

So the up/down thing you mentioned is what 'most' do because they have certain races/times of the year that they want to be their fastest at. Even though there are early season races, they might not be as much of a priority as some of the later season races.

In warmer parts of the country and now with many people doing cyclocross in addition to mtn bike racing there doesn't seem to be as much of an "off" season compared to "in" season. So maybe your type of year round program might be more suitable.

The question is do you want to be 'fast' all year round, or do you want to be 'faster' at certain parts of the year?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
LemurianGuy said:
I want to be you!! :p Sounds like you're enjoying a well deserved retirement. I'm not qualified to comment on your program other than to say I hope I can be that active when I'm 60!
Do you find many XC races with a 60+ age group?
Thanks, yeah, retirement is great....but then again you're old when you get there. We're very active but man, the aches and pains.......

I race in Grand Master 50+ here in the southeast in several regional series. NORBA will rank me in 60+ --- dunno about your area but their are some tough guys in 50+ around here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
ashwinearl said:
The question is do you want to be 'fast' all year round, or do you want to be 'faster' at certain parts of the year?
That's an interesting way of thinking about it. Given that I ride mostly with guys 1/2 my age I'd rather be "fast" year round. BTW, great blog!
 

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Well howdy, stranger!

Good to see you here! We rode with you and your bride out in Jackson some months ago...and I immediately lost the card you gave me with your contact info.

Those of us who have been TOO SERIOUS about this racing tend to do a periodized training program. After I met Dave Morris in '97 and he began coaching me, I started bringin his principles to this board. I used to post a lot, but other interests have gotten in the way, and I just haven't had the same passion for racing the last couple of years. Ashwinearl has picked up the slack as far as trying to communicate DaveM's ideas around here.

I'll drop you a note...just had a quick glance at your website...cool! And I see you did go across into the 'darkside' of big wheels! If I get more serious about my riding, I will likely add a Leviathan to my stable.
 

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I wouldn't worry about it to much. I worked for a racer who follows a similar approach; no stringent periodization, just lots of hard work. He seems to do ok with it (though he's incredibly talented too) and won the minnesota state road race last year
 
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