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High Desert MTBer
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Discussion Starter #1
I have been toying with the idea of getting a dropper post for my AM bike, but so far have not been impressed by ANY model out there. I am still thinking that it is just not worth the money for something that adds that weight, but most of all is not 'fit for purpose' in some way. I keep seeing stories of failures, and accounts of gradually increasing efficiency issues. I am still of the opinion that I shall continue to keep manually adjusting my post height as necessary, and as I have always done. Am I wrong? Can anyone convince me otherwise? I would love to not keep getting on and off the bike to make these adjustments...
 

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Rabid Lana Fan
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If you can get past the looks of it, the Gravity Dropper is rock solid.

The Specialized Command Post is right up there in reliability, if you have the redesigned seal. If you have an older one with the old seal, any Specialized shop should be able to replace the seal under warranty.

My Command Post had the old seal, the local Specialized dealer replaced it under warranty, and now it works like new everytime after a year of abuse.

I do have to add that I wasn't too impressed with the stock remote on the CP. I replaced it with the joystick style remote from a Joplin, and now it's all bliss.
 

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I've had the Joplin for around a year and a half. No problems, use it all the time. For lift service, I swap out to a regular seat post, however for Vermont single track I think it is great. I also use the handle bar remote, reaching under the seat when dropping into rocks, etc is dicey.
 

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Retro on Steroids
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One of each, but I like the Joplin more. My Gravity Dropper has a handlebar trigger, but It only stops at the ends of the travel. It is now on my third-string "loaner" bike.

The Joplin is triggered under the saddle, so I can switch it between bikes, and keep the same set of tools under the saddle. It stops anywhere on the travel.
 

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I've been using the Joplin 4R for a few months now, and I haven't noticed a single problem. I use it nearly every single ride, I absolutely love it. I picked one up practically brand new for $125, the guy I got it from only used it a couple rides, just didn't like it. Check eBay or the classified here, they pop up all the time.
 

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In my opinion a dropper seat post is well worth the added weight if a rider wants to climb in an efficient riding position but also have a good attack position on descents. I was a late adopter getting my dropper seat post last fall and I cannot imagine riding without one now.
 

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I got a specialied command post black lite and it has improved my riding big time. Like many that own one, once you use a dropper post...you wont go back to a standard post.
 

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In my opinion a dropper seat post is well worth the added weight if a rider wants to climb in an efficient riding position but also have a good attack position on descents. I was a late adopter getting my dropper seat post last fall and I cannot imagine riding without one now.
I think the point of the OP's post was that he believes you'all are early adopters, and that the "just right" adopter time may be coming.

I tend to think he's right. $200-$300 for a seat post with a spring and a remote clamp does seem like a whole bunch of money when you consider that by comparison you can by a serviceable kids bike for that amount.

If you look at the materials and tech in a dropper post, they should cost maybe 50% more than a regular post. The high prices suggests you're paying for newness and for a unusually high repair warranty rate.

I'd looks for 1 more generation of technical improvements to simplify, and improve reliability/durability, and then a little bit of time for the market to saturate with competitors to drive the price down.
 

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Maaaaan
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I'm to cheap to buy a dropper post, plus it just adds more weight to the bike. It's also one more thing to fix/rebuild... or break during a ride, and they do, do that.
I just ride up with the post in one position then stop for all of 15 secs or so and lower it for the ride down.
 

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Aloha rockerc,

I too was in the same boat. It's hard for me to justify spending that much money and adding the weight to the bike. I have the X-Fuxion HiLo (not too many choices with the 27.2 size). The X-Fusion is a little more then a pound heavier then the KCNC that it replaced.

I agree, it's easy enough to stop, lower the seat and then get back on the bike. Or.......if you ride in an area that doesn't require you to lower the seat often, it makes sense. I used to say that I don't lower my seat too often and it's not much of an issue to stop when I need to to lower the seat.

Then....I went on this year's mountain bike trip to BC Canada. A friend had a spare Gravity Dropper seatpost so I put it on my bike and tried it. At first it was a bit awkward remembering to lower my seatpost (just to try it in stuff). I found that it wasn't as though I couldn't ride the stuff or it was really that difficult, I found that it just made the experience more fun. Sort of the idea of riding a bike with suspension. We don't need it, it adds weight and complexity to the bike. In the end, it just makes the riding that much more fun. I've now found that I can be riding along and just lower (or raise) the saddle for things without thinking too much because the quick change allows the riding to just happen quicker.

So going back to your querry. Yes, I was in the same boat as you with the same issues. I moved over to the dark side and enjoy the change. It took a "borrow" from a friend to see the benefits. I suggest you do the same. See if there's someone you can borrow one from for a period. In the end, you may or may not decide it is worth it. Like I said above, I personally am able to ride everything I come up to here without having to lower my saddle. However, it sure does make the experience more fun and easier. Good luck with the decision.

g
 

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Dropping your saddle lets you get your center of gravity lower and once you are able to quickly do it without stopping you'll start to find advantages to that all over the trail, not just on the steep downhills where you considered it worth the effort in the past. It's annoying really how addictive they are!
 

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I agree that the current offerings are still not reliable enough but I did go out and buy a Joplin4R and changed out the joystick remote with one form a Manitou fork with IT. On some trails I hardly use it. On others I use it alot.
Could I ride without it, yes. Does it make me a better rider, I don't think so. But its nice to have when the going gets rough.
 

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YOUREGO ISNOT YOURAMIGO
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My RS reverb is sweet and an absolute must have. So you have to bleed it every 6 months. It's a 10 minute job.


I'm to cheap to buy a dropper post, plus it just adds more weight to the bike. It's also one more thing to fix/rebuild... or break during a ride, and they do, do that.
I just ride up with the post in one position then stop for all of 15 secs or so and lower it for the ride down.



Lame. Lame. Lame
Just sayin
Get outta the past and into the future.
Cause My 3 GD'ers ROK :band:
No stopping, No waitin for yor buds, Very, very, low maintenance, bettah flow.
If it fails in the field, No prob.
G-out all
 

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I started using them several years ago because we have a lot of rolling terrain here and I hated having to stop all the time to get off the bike. I've got two bikes with gravity droppers partly because they were one of the only ones at the time that fit my seattube size. I've been investigating the newer posts out there, it seems like a crap shoot with reliability. The GD's may lack infinite seat height ability but make up for it in dead reliability because they are stoopid simple. Even though the older one is several years old I have yet to touch either of them yet, when those bikes are eventually sold I may just keep the posts for their replacements.
 

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Te mortuo heres tibi sim?
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Gravity Dropper. Been around the longest, has the best track record. Can fit any bike, may need a shim, has a decent remote - and the cable doesn't flop around lower when the post is lowered. Light-ish. Easy to maintain. One of mine is 6 or 7 years old, and still kicking strong. Great support from the company if you have issues, and they get parts out quickly if you need anything.

Downside: kinda' fugly, only has pre-set stops.

I like the functionality of my Reverb more, and it's better ergonomics at the remote lever. Sucky part is the hose flopping around when the post is lowered, and long term durability is an unknown at this point, particularly with so many people having issues with the first generations.
 

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High Desert MTBer
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Discussion Starter #19
Early adopter? Interesting.....I saw my first dropper seat post three years ago. Perhaps its a Colorado thing.
Wow! I am impressed! 3 Whole Years Ago!!! And you are from CO??!?! (Excuse me while I bow and scrape).

Seriously, I have heard good things about GDs and reliability, and the new RokShox sounds like it could be a winner. Think it is down to one or other of these. Thanks for taking the time to give me your opinions!
 

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Wow! I am impressed! 3 Whole Years Ago!!! And you are from CO??!?! (Excuse me while I bow and scrape).

Seriously, I have heard good things about GDs and reliability, and the new RokShox sounds like it could be a winner. Think it is down to one or other of these. Thanks for taking the time to give me your opinions!
I had a spring activated thingy that acted like a dropper post (right angle spring that had a seat post clamp and something like a hose clamp to attach to the actual seat post). You would loosen the seat post clamp and slide it up and down to adjust. I could kind of do it while riding. That was back in 1986 or so. Been so long I don't really remember.
 
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