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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Having not paid much attention these last few years, what exactly is meant by "All Mountain" ? and how does it differ from Free Ride ?, which if memory serves, is a slightly different bike then a pure DH, with more XC abilities.

Perhaps a link to an on-line resource would be helpful.

Thanks,

SB
 

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Old man on a bike
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They're more about marketing than definite limits we all know and love. I think of free ride these days more as more stunt-oriented and all-mountain as more rugged xc. Can't wait for another few years as to what we're gonna call stuff. Current line up is "downhill" is the most extreme sort of descending bike with little regard to climbing ability, free ride is a bit more climbing friendly, all mountain is even more climbing friendly, cross country even more climbing friendly, and xc race being almost all about the climbing. At least that's the way I look at it.
 

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From Marzocchi's web site

Here are some general definitions of riding styles, used by Marzocchi to define intended usage of their products. Everyone has a slightly different spin in these terms, but they should give you a general idea.

Cross Country (XC)/Marathon: Riding along hilly trails where some bumps and smaller obstacles, such as rocks, roots, or depressions, may be encountered. XC riding does not include jumps or "drops" (riding off rocks, fallen trees or ledges) from any height. XC forks must only be used with tires specifically designed for cross country riding, or disk, rim or linear pull brakes.

All Mountain (AM): Riding BASED WITH more emphasis on aggressive XC riding WITH larger obstacles. AM RIDING DOES NOT INCLUDE LARGE JUMPS OR DROPS. These forks should be used only with disk brakes, as well as frames, wheels and other components specifically designed for this riding style. The disk brakes must be attached to the designated mounting points provided on the fork. Never make any modification to your fork to attach any equipment.

Trekking: Trekking is similar to XC riding but not as aggressive as XC. It involves slower riding and no riding obstacles such as rocks, roots, or depressions. You should only attach generators and racks to the designated mounting points provided on the forks. Never make any modification to your fork to attach any equipment.

FreeRide (FR): This riding style is for skilled riders and involves aggressive slopes, large obstacles, and moderate jumps. Free Ride forks should be used only with disk brakes as well as frames, wheels and other components specifically designed for Free Riding. The disk brakes must be attached to the designated mounting points provided on the fork. Never make any modification to your fork to attach any equipment.

Dirt Jumper (DJ) / Urban Riding: This "BMX" or "motocross" style riding is only for the most skilled riders and involves jumping from one mound of dirt to another. It also includes riding over and around "urban obstacles" such as man-made or other concrete structures. These forks should be used only with disk brakes, as well as frames, wheels and other components specifically designed for this riding style. The disk brakes must be attached to the designated mounting points provided on the fork. Never make any modification to your fork to attach any equipment.

Down Hill (DH) / Extreme Free Ride: This discipline is only for professional or highly skilled riders. It includes for relatively high jumps or "drops" and negotiating larger obstacles such as boulders, fallen trees or holes. These forks should be used only with disk brakes, as well as frames, wheels and other components specifically designed for this riding style. The disk brakes must be attached to the designated mounting points provided on the fork. Never make any modification to your fork to attach any equipment.
 

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Another festivus MIRACLE!
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A good example

is Enduro Expert is all mountain, and the Enduro is FR.
 

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There is no exact meaning. There are too many categories being used.
XCraceXCagressiveXCtrailaggressivetrailallmountainlightfreerideblackdiamondfreerideDHdoubleblackdiamondDHrace have blurred together creating more confusion than clarity.
 

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Ride Instigator
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I'd describe AM is the niche to fit between XC and FR. AM bikes are a good choice for bigger guys for riding XC kinda' stuff. I weigh about 200# and had a 4" travel bike with more of an XC kind of build and things started breaking after a while. I have a 5" bike now with more of an AM/aggro Trail build and it's been very reliable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ricko said:
I'd describe AM is the niche to fit between XC and FR. AM bikes are a good choice for bigger guys for riding XC kinda' stuff. I weigh about 200# and had a 4" travel bike with more of an XC kind of build and things started breaking after a while. I have a 5" bike now with more of an AM/aggro Trail build and it's been very reliable.
Ok, think I've got it

Down Hill = 17 - 22 year olds, parents insurance, thinking of grad school, no concern over serious injury.

Free Mountain = 23-28 yr. olds, basic insurance, part time job while "finding" oneself, has time for major injury

All Mountain = 30 - 37 yr. olds, full time job, doesn't really want to get hurt, thus no DH'ing anymore, injury's hard to explain to boss.

XC = 40 +, Has decent life insurance, hopes mt. biking will keep one in sufficiant shape so as to not need it, falling injury's easy to explain to boss (work), harder to explain to REAL boss (wife), who still treats old injuries from 20 years ago.

Grinning

SB
 

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trail rat
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Lightning Guy - I think you nailed it.

Back when I started riding in 1970, there were road bikes. Then in the late 1970's there were mountain bikes. I got my first one in 1979. I had a mountain bike and a road bike; it was easy to tell which was which. :p
 

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ride hard take risks
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Lighting Guy said:
Ok, think I've got it

Down Hill = 17 - 22 year olds, parents insurance, thinking of grad school, no concern over serious injury.

Free Mountain = 23-28 yr. olds, basic insurance, part time job while "finding" oneself, has time for major injury

All Mountain = 30 - 37 yr. olds, full time job, doesn't really want to get hurt, thus no DH'ing anymore, injury's hard to explain to boss.

XC = 40 +, Has decent life insurance, hopes mt. biking will keep one in sufficiant shape so as to not need it, falling injury's easy to explain to boss (work), harder to explain to REAL boss (wife), who still treats old injuries from 20 years ago.

Grinning

SB
I'm 47 & hate XC too much like work :cool:
 

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I feel it's all a marketing sceme. They try to make you believe that unless you're on their latest FS bike than you can not have any fun while riding your favorite trail.
 

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ride hard take risks
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MTB'ing is in a huge boom & there are so many choices to pick from. Just figure what kind of riding you want to do, how much weight you are willing to drag around (mine 39.65lb 6in travel), then your head will spin on what type rear suspenssion set up do you like. Yahoo 4-bar, faux bax, single pivot, VPP, exoscopionflingflang, argg!! Next the fork huu oh no not again :D.
Have fun & do alot of reading beffor the weather gets back to riding season.
 

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Lighting Guy said:
Ok, think I've got it

Down Hill = 17 - 22 year olds, parents insurance, thinking of grad school, no concern over serious injury.

Free Mountain = 23-28 yr. olds, basic insurance, part time job while "finding" oneself, has time for major injury

All Mountain = 30 - 37 yr. olds, full time job, doesn't really want to get hurt, thus no DH'ing anymore, injury's hard to explain to boss.

XC = 40 +, Has decent life insurance, hopes mt. biking will keep one in sufficiant shape so as to not need it, falling injury's easy to explain to boss (work), harder to explain to REAL boss (wife), who still treats old injuries from 20 years ago.

Grinning

SB
This response should be made a sticky in the Beginner Section.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Lumbee1 said:
This response should be made a sticky in the Beginner Section.
It's actually my own variation of something I read about 12 years ago when I was road racing as a Cat IV, on the definitions of the [USCF] - US Cycling racing categories, which refered to the ability level being directly related to training time:

Cat V = Married, Kids, Mortgage, Car Payment, Job

Cat IV = Married, Kids, Car Payment, Job

Cat III = Married, Car Payment, Job

Cat II = Car Payment, Job

Cat I = Car Payment

SB
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
dogonfr said:
MTB'ing is in a huge boom & there are so many choices to pick from. Just figure what kind of riding you want to do, how much weight you are willing to drag around (mine 39.65lb 6in travel), then your head will spin on what type rear suspenssion set up do you like. Yahoo 4-bar, faux bax, single pivot, VPP, exoscopionflingflang, argg!! Next the fork huu oh no not again :D.
Have fun & do alot of reading beffor the weather gets back to riding season.
It also seems as a great thing for the manufacturers, design a bike with a particular parts package, wanting to market as a 27 lbs XC, but the slug weighs in at 29 lbs - SO CALL IT AN ALL MOUNTAIN !.

In reality, the terminology made sense, in terms of frame design and fork/shock travel being very specific to a usage. Shows us how far the designer (frame and shock) have come in being able to design an 8" travel bike for DH, down to a 4" for XC. That wasn't available 10 years ago, the the ability they have now.

Pretty cool stuff actually, in line with my impression that my Stumpy is a much better bike then my Proflex 855 from 10 years ago, especially in terms of suspension performance. I'm actually one level lower in component group, but everything seems better. Only trade off is the Stumpy is about 2-1/2 lbs heavier. Seemingly more reliable though...

SB
 

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I see it

as only 3, anything else is just marketing.

XC = Lighter side,not much in the way of jumping or technical type of riding.

Freeride = Medium side, weight isn't the detirmening factor when building the bike. Looking more for preformance then weight. Can be considered extreme to newbies.

Downhill = Heavy side. Mostly for the younger set who haven't found out that those crashes live with you for the rest of your life, but can also be done by some of the older guys who just have too much testosterone and too much skill not to be going full out regardless of the pitch of the downhill. These guys are missing the mortgage gene.

Don't get sucked into the hype.
 

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Pain Freak said:
as only 3, anything else is just marketing.

XC = Lighter side,not much in the way of jumping or technical type of riding.

Freeride = Medium side, weight isn't the detirmening factor when building the bike. Looking more for preformance then weight. Can be considered extreme to newbies.

Downhill = Heavy side. Mostly for the younger set who haven't found out that those crashes live with you for the rest of your life, but can also be done by some of the older guys who just have too much testosterone and too much skill not to be going full out regardless of the pitch of the downhill. These guys are missing the mortgage gene.

Don't get sucked into the hype.
I'm still going to say that something between XC and FR is necessary. I consider FR as something like a Bullit, starting in the 35-36 lb range or build it all the way up to 45-46 if you really want to go big. AM is what I'd call my Heckler, weighing in at about 32lbs, it will take a pretty good slammming around from my 200 lb self and is still a very capable climber.
 
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