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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I currently run DT Swiss XR4.1d rims laced to Hope XC rims. I just received my DT Swiss (Eclipse) tubeless conversion kit, and to make a long story short, I hate double sided tape :madman: and apparently I am even less mechanically inclined than I thought. So I have decided that I won't be trying the conversion thing again-- even with Stan's.

But now that I have heard so many good things about running lower tire pressures and better rolling resistance (from reading this board way too much), I really want to give tubeless a try. So my solution is to have my rims laced to Mavic 819's. But I am wondering If I get a flat out in the middle of nowhere, how difficult would it be to get the UST tires to work with a tube if I need to throw one in? (I should point out that although I can't install an eclipse conversion kit to save my life, I can usually change normal kevlar tires very quickly). Also, if for some reason I don't like the UST tires, can I just run non-UST kevlar tires with tubes just as easily as on my XR4.1d's?

For those who have changed, has really made a noticeable different in your riding; I really don't flat very often.

Thanks for reading.
 

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I've been running UST for three years - never had a flat since I made the change. I don't even bring a tube/pump anymore. I run 30 psi front and 33 rear. I top off the tire pressure every time I ride. If you do get a puncture (small) its really not a big deal, the ones I had in the past take literally all day to make the tire deflate. A sidewall tear would be less good. However, UST tires have very thick sidewalls, which is why they're so damn heavy.

As far a better rolling resistance, that's not something I could feel. But, theoretically it makes sense. The lower pressure without fear of a pinch flat is the best part of running tubeless.

The downside is UST rims and tires are heavier and more expensive. But, the rims are stronger and a bit wider than XC rims like your 4.1s. You can compensate for the weight penalty somewhat by going with a lighter gauge spoke. The 819's strength allow for greater spoke tension and therefore a stiffer wheel for a given spoke. If you want the ultimate, get Sapim Cx-Ray spokes with your 819s -- light and strong.

Lots of people use Mavic 819's with tubes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Dulyebr

That's exactly what I was looking for. I was wondering about the rolling resistance thing; my guess is I wouldn't notice either. 819's seem like a great option.
 

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If I do get a catastrophic failure, 1 inch cut in the sidewall, it's just about over. But if I do get a puncture large enough that the Stan's cannont seal I just pull the valve stem, check the tire and put a tube in and I'm off and riding. Also being able to run lower psi improves the grip of the tire.

I don't use UST tires but I should. The lack of a tube is one of the reasons the UST tire is thicker and therefore heavier. The strange thing is that I had more problems with the UST tires than with the non UST and Stan's as for durability.
 

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I have been riding UST for 2 years now without a flat. I still carry a tube but I expect to use it to help someone else more than I. Also, I have two UST wheelsets and both are the real thing: Mavic UST (XM819 & Crossmax SL). Those work the best. No rim strips needed, they are easy to get tires on and off, they are stiff, no sealant needed (you can still use some so a puncture gets taken care of without even having to stop) and when taking tires off, you can feel how much the beads get locked into place, they wont come off unless you want them to which is very reassuring. I wont touch anything else now. DT rims are great but for riding Tubeless, they are just not as clever as Mavic's way to do it.
 
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