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Mac & Jacks African Amber
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Installed new XT Cassette in place of OEM SRAM PG950 and new HG93 Chain. The bike shifts clean on the stand. Chain pulled out of pin again. So, both original SRAM chain has broken twice before the new stuff above. Does this sound familar to anyone? What am I doing wrong or what alignment can be off. I don't get it.
 

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WTF
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292 Posts
its not a shimano pin or quicklink setup is it? these do not do well with sram chains....and they are not known to be super reliable with shimano chains either...sram powerlinks are the way to go.

also, check cassette and cranks for bent teeth maybe? doubt this would not show on the stand and then break chains, but ya never know.
 

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It might not be the chain, it might be you.

I'll assume you did everything correct mechanically. Chain breakage used to be a rare problem and you had to be a real animal to break one. Two things have changed; mountain biking and Hyperglide (or gated shifting by any other name).

Hyperglide was introduced to make shifting smoother and easier under load. It was a necessary improvement which made index shifting possible. the problem is that it makes shifting under load too easy at the expense of tremendous side pressure on the chain plates.

To address this chain riveting was changed from simple press fits to the headed riveting in use today (which is why you can't simply re-splice a chain by pushing back the pin anymore), but can only do so much. Whenever I hear of folks having multiple chain failures, I therefore suspect the rider.

Mountain biking increases chain breakage because the rapid changes get ahead of the rider's ability to shift fast enough, so many riders end up shifting too late and under too much load. On the road grade changes are more gradual, and usually seen at a distance, so it's rare for road cyclists to break chains.

I don't know you, so I can't say for sure what's happening, but if you're a fairly new rider, try to give some thought to how and when you shift. Anticipate your gear needs and shift before you're forced to. Also try to lighten up the pedal pressure during the shift to avoid jamming the chain onto the new cog before it releases the old one.
 
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