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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently ordered a new GF Marlin. I'm a bit oversize...5'8" and 210lbs. I'll probly be riding it pretty tame till I get my legs, lungs and all my other parts back into shape. Planning on the bike path with my wife, and some light cross country trail riding by myself.

I know I'll probly try something I shouldnt, and bust parts if their not up to my weight, any suggestions for rims, tires and maybe front suspension to upgrade to when this happens. And any advice on other parts to watch closely?

Thanks.
 

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Give yourself a break. 210 is not that big in terms of stressing a bike. I might advise you to pay attention to your spoke tensions but everything else should work just fine.

Once you start getting the hang of this and start hammering then maybe we'll have concerns with other things on the bike. High stress and poor shifting technique breaks chains. At the same time dirty and poorly lubricated components make things awful too. So just take care of things and pay attention while you learn how to do all this stuff.

Have fun.
 

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At 210lbs, you're on the 'boney' side as far as clydesdales are concerned ;) I don't think you really have too much to worry about until you start getting pretty aggressive on rougher trails.

A slightly better wheelset is going to run close to $200 or more and a definite step up in wheels will run $300-$400 or more.

A (new) upgraded fork is going to be >$300+/- or more. At 210lbs, you might see if you get a firmer spring for that fork. Ask for the 'narrow-behinded-clyde' spring. . . . . I kid, but only about the 'nbc' part, not about trying to get a firmer spring.

The stock tires will likely be fine for path riding and casual XC use. When you are ready for new tires, you would possibly like tires in the 2.2" to 2.3" range for some extra volume that will give a little plusher ride and better traction/grip.

I wouldn't worry about those things for now and honestly, I would avoid the upgrade bug for as long as possibly if not altogether.

A nice helmet, gloves and some shirts made from a good sweat wicking material to go along with some new bike shorts would be a good place to toss some extra dollars toward. Your wife might appreciate some of that stuff too.

But most importanty, you should just get out and ride & enjoy your new bike(s).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
"Boney" side?:D Thanks. I aint been called that in years!!!

I guess I was just assuming, from lurking here, that the wheels and forks on this bike were gonna be low end enough that they may not put up with much if the rider wasnt <150lbs. I didnt plan on replacing anything till it broke, and the longer till it breaks...the happier I'll be.

My only concern is.... I know me. It took all of about 2 months to pretty much destroy a Wal-Mart Giant last time. Kinda discouraged me. I didnt even use it that hard, I had just quit smoking and needed to lose weight (same boat I'm in now).

As far as the upgrade bug, I'm afraid I've already got that. In all of my other hobbies, archery, guns, etc.. I just cant stand not to "improve" on things that work. It's a personality defect.
 

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The Gary Fischer should be plenty tough. Assuming you don't start doing 4 foot drops and or bombing rock gardens this bike should last a long time with proper maintenance. If something breaks then you can have fun researching better parts to replace it with. For now take it for a ride and make sure it fits and is comfortable. There is no reason that you can't "upgrade" the saddle, stem, handlebars and grips to your liking. Don't be afraid to peddle hard! "It never gets easier, you just get faster"
 

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Lone Wolf8634 said:
"Boney" side?:D Thanks. I aint been called that in years!!!

I guess I was just assuming, from lurking here, that the wheels and forks on this bike were gonna be low end enough that they may not put up with much if the rider wasnt <150lbs. I didnt plan on replacing anything till it broke, and the longer till it breaks...the happier I'll be.

My only concern is.... I know me. It took all of about 2 months to pretty much destroy a Wal-Mart Giant last time. Kinda discouraged me. I didnt even use it that hard, I had just quit smoking and needed to lose weight (same boat I'm in now).

As far as the upgrade bug, I'm afraid I've already got that. In all of my other hobbies, archery, guns, etc.. I just cant stand not to "improve" on things that work. It's a personality defect.
As long as tyou have been made aware that upgrading entry level bikes is usually not the cheapest way to go, it's your money to do with as you please. And there are lots of us around to help you spend it the way we would like to spend it if was our own ;)

Ride hard, rinse, repeat. Everything else will work itself out.
 

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I'd agree - that bike should be fine for what you want to use it for without any upgrades.

You can put in some rail trail miles to work on your legs if you want, but the best thing is just to get out and get some time on dirt.

You'll find the initial challenge is just getting used to the roots & rocks, and dealing with the climbs. But if you can get out twice or more a week you'll be amazed at how fast those skills become ingrained, and you start to really attack the trail. And the fun level changes too, from the enjoyment of just being able to do it, to a real feeling of earned accomplishment when you climb a rocky hill that used to kick yer butt - and just keep on going. When I first started it took me 1 hr 15 minutes to ride a lap on a trail that I can now do in 23 minutes.

Just be careful and make your advances in sensible increments - you don't want to hurt yourself. It takes a lot longer to heal at 45 than it did at 25.

Steve Z
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the replies... I'm really happy the bike will do what I need for a while without expensive upgrades.

ChainChain: I kinda thought I might need to play with the handlebars and stem to get it to fit me. ...But do grips make much difference?

JeffJ: I kinda thaought the Marlin would be worth upgrading...eventually. Seems to be the same frame that most of the other Fischer 29ers are using. At least until you get to the X-Caliber.

Swampboy62: I have a lot of dirt to ride! Around here (Casper Wy) there are a bazillion miles of dirt roads, cattle trails, game trails and whatnot.

But before I tackle much of that, I gotta get the lungs workin again....recently quit smoking and right now I'd be willing to bet that a gentle hill on a bike trail would set my chest on fire.

I'm with ya on the healing up in your 40's though...just turned 43. I tell my wife that when your 20, your like a superball...You bounce. At 40 your more like an egg....Splat!!:D
 

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Lone Wolf8634 said:
JeffJ: I kinda thaought the Marlin would be worth upgrading...eventually. Seems to be the same frame that most of the other Fischer 29ers are using. At least until you get to the X-Caliber.
That the frame is the same as higher priced models is a good thing, but upgrading is still a more expensive way to go vs. getting all the bike you can up front.

It's a difficult disease to avoid. I've done it more than once :cool: .

You know how it is, the reformed always squeal the loudest ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
jeffj said:
That the frame is the same as higher priced models is a good thing, but upgrading is still a more expensive way to go vs. getting all the bike you can up front.

It's a difficult disease to avoid. I've done it more than once :cool: .

You know how it is, the reformed always squeal the loudest ;)
Well, Since the bike will do what I want without dropping a bunch into it...I figure I'll just try to be nice to it, get my wind back, then if I get into this like I think I will, Maybe I'll save all that improvement money and get me a F/S trail bike. Then use the Marlin for riding with my wife. The most she's likely to see is a graded dirt road.
 

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I just bought the same bike. It is too wet to ride here so I have had it out yet. Mamba was in the upper levels of my budget, but when I have up graded equipment in my other hobbies I always gone over the next level. Plan is to up-grade past the Mamba level of components (fork/brakes/crank) anyway, and move those parts over to a different frame in a few years if "all goes according to plan." That is my thinking, for now anyway everything will work fine while I get myself into "trail shape." Brand new daddy, just quit smoking and 6'3" 235 lbs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
ziggy76 said:
I just bought the same bike. It is too wet to ride here so I have had it out yet. Mamba was in the upper levels of my budget, but when I have up graded equipment in my other hobbies I always gone over the next level. Plan is to up-grade past the Mamba level of components (fork/brakes/crank) anyway, and move those parts over to a different frame in a few years if "all goes according to plan." That is my thinking, for now anyway everything will work fine while I get myself into "trail shape." Brand new daddy, just quit smoking and 6'3" 235 lbs.
Well, Congratulations, Dad.:thumbsup: I'm still in the delicate stage of "I really really really really want a smoke." Right now I'm just looking forward to getting back in shape and having a bit of fun. So when I think I mught slip up and light up, I tell myself "Yup, THAT'LL get ya up that hill a bunch faster.":D

And the daydreams I was having involved a lot of things like high-end shocks, brakes, wheels and so on and so forth. But now that I sit back and think about it, I'm gonna wait till I get in shape, make sure I stick with this (I'm sure I will, I remember all the fun I had on the WallyWorld bike before I broke it). Then I think maybe I'll look into something like the Rumblefish or the Fuel EX8. Looks like fun.
 

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Thanks man. I have slipped up plenty, quit at Christmas and went pretty well chewing the gum and then baby and mamma spent 4 days in the hospital and that made me a nervous wreck just trying to get everyone home healthy which they both are now. I just ordered pedals and grips as first upgrades? if they are called that. was going to get some bb7 but decided to wait a while and seen how these brakes break in. I am always thinking about what to change out to improve performance, but going to wait and talk to the shop guys and get their imput as far as component upgrades, and wait till I actually get to ride it on the trails a few times before I do anymore. For now it will be bike paths and roads until it stops raining which it will never stop here in Indiana in the spring.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Glad to hear everyone made it home and are doing well.

I think pedals and grips are as far as I will go to start, well, maybe a different seat....we'll see if the stock one wants to hurt me. But am truly going to try to control my disorder about "improving" things.

Ex truck driver BTW. I know all about Indiana in the spring. We aint even close to spring yet here.
 

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Welcome to the site and welcome back to the sport.
Out of my mtbs, the one I ride the most, by far, is my HT (front suspension). but I chose my fully rigid when street or path riding, and FS when downhilling or really knarly trails. It's cheaper to buy a whole bike than to upgrade a whole bike, and it seems like no matter what you upgrade to that there's always something better or lighter or whatever coming out.
It's much faster and easier to control amount and time of calories taken in as compared to burning them off. As we age our metab slows. Riding 3 or more times a week will help speed up your metab but so does eating smaller meals 5-6 times a day. Don't go for all or nothing. Make small changes, keep them going for a month or 2 and ride that wave of progress. When your progress slows, make more, or better changes. Have seen this aproach to be much more effective long term.
For your first round I'll recommend.... Ride for 45+ minutes, at least 3x a week. Drink more water unless you're already drinking 10+ glases a day. Take a multi vitamin and fish oil with last meal of the day. Eat as soon as you get up and every 2 1/2 - 3 hours after. Eating this way will help keep, build, and repair muscles, and decrease the amount of fat storage. It might take your body a few weeks to realise that there's a constant flow of food, and that it doesn't have to store some, in the form of fat, for later, but it works.
Good Luck
 

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Hi Lone Wolf:

You and I are starting at the same time of year, though not the same time in life (I'm 53).

Picked up my very first MTB last week. Been out 4x so far and can feel my wind coming back already. I feel more confident each time. However, I did manage to wipe out earlier this week. (I was coming down a somewhat steep section with loose dirt; managed to descend slowly, but couldn't avoid a ditch at the bottom). Hurt my pride, for the most part. So today I dialed it back just a bit. Gotta regroup and go at it again.

My words of wisdom after a whole week--enjoy, but take it slow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
theMeat said:
Welcome to the site and welcome back to the sport.
Out of my mtbs, the one I ride the most, by far, is my HT (front suspension). but I chose my fully rigid when street or path riding, and FS when downhilling or really knarly trails. It's cheaper to buy a whole bike than to upgrade a whole bike, and it seems like no matter what you upgrade to that there's always something better or lighter or whatever coming out.
It's much faster and easier to control amount and time of calories taken in as compared to burning them off. As we age our metab slows. Riding 3 or more times a week will help speed up your metab but so does eating smaller meals 5-6 times a day. Don't go for all or nothing. Make small changes, keep them going for a month or 2 and ride that wave of progress. When your progress slows, make more, or better changes. Have seen this aproach to be much more effective long term.
For your first round I'll recommend.... Ride for 45+ minutes, at least 3x a week. Drink more water unless you're already drinking 10+ glases a day. Take a multi vitamin and fish oil with last meal of the day. Eat as soon as you get up and every 2 1/2 - 3 hours after. Eating this way will help keep, build, and repair muscles, and decrease the amount of fat storage. It might take your body a few weeks to realise that there's a constant flow of food, and that it doesn't have to store some, in the form of fat, for later, but it works.
Good Luck
Thanks for the welcome. And the advice. I'm not so hot at knowing how to lose the weight and get my lungs back in shape, I just know I gotta do it. I'll probly be adding some mild lifting to my riding. While I dont really think I'll get bak to the 135lbs of my oil rig days, 160 or 170 would be nice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Tambike2 said:
Hi Lone Wolf:

You and I are starting at the same time of year, though not the same time in life (I'm 53).

Picked up my very first MTB last week. Been out 4x so far and can feel my wind coming back already. I feel more confident each time. However, I did manage to wipe out earlier this week. (I was coming down a somewhat steep section with loose dirt; managed to descend slowly, but couldn't avoid a ditch at the bottom). Hurt my pride, for the most part. So today I dialed it back just a bit. Gotta regroup and go at it again.

My words of wisdom after a whole week--enjoy, but take it slow.
Hey Tambike2, We all gotta start out sometime. I just wish I had gotten smarter sooner, like at 23, or even 33.

So what bike did ya get. If ya made it a whole week before you dumped it, you're doing better then I will I bet. Even though I have no choice but to take it slow, I'm sure I'll have a dumb-a$$ attack inside a week!!!:D
 

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Hi Lone Wolf:

Yeah, I know. Wish I started earlier too. But no point in waiting any longer.

On the bike choice, I may have gone overboard. I got a Spec Epic Comp 29er. I wanted the 29er so I could do well on pavement and flats, and I thought that full suspension would be more forgiving in picking lines for descent and be easier on my body. Many of the other full suspension bikes had more travel than I needed and were more heavy-duty (I'm not going to go off 3 ft drops). I like the bike a lot so far. It climbs well, moves pretty fast on the flats, and I feel like it'll be a really good performer as my skills improve.

I live by a mountain with great trails, but it is all up and then down. I find that after about a 20 minutes of climbing (by a very easy graded fire road) I get a lot of energy. Then I want to tackle a route that is tougher, so I take a detour. (Hey, look at that trail, that looks really fun. Maybe I should go down there . . ..) Pretty soon I'm in over my head. On the other hand, I sure am exploring places I haven't seen, even though I've lived here for a long time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Tambike2 said:
Hi Lone Wolf:

Yeah, I know. Wish I started earlier too. But no point in waiting any longer.

On the bike choice, I may have gone overboard. I got a Spec Epic Comp 29er. I wanted the 29er so I could do well on pavement and flats, and I thought that full suspension would be more forgiving in picking lines for descent and be easier on my body. Many of the other full suspension bikes had more travel than I needed and were more heavy-duty (I'm not going to go off 3 ft drops). I like the bike a lot so far. It climbs well, moves pretty fast on the flats, and I feel like it'll be a really good performer as my skills improve.

I live by a mountain with great trails, but it is all up and then down. I find that after about a 20 minutes of climbing (by a very easy graded fire road) I get a lot of energy. Then I want to tackle a route that is tougher, so I take a detour. (Hey, look at that trail, that looks really fun. Maybe I should go down there . . ..) Pretty soon I'm in over my head. On the other hand, I sure am exploring places I haven't seen, even though I've lived here for a long time.
Dayam!!! You did go all out. My wife would skin me alive if I bought that as my first bike. I thought she was gonna bust a vein over the Marlin. I figured I would show her I was sticking with it by wearing out this bike before I dropped a bomb on her and tried for the Fuel EX!!!

I began archery hunting about 4 years ago, so I got a real good idea where I can go to try my hand (or my legs) on trails of varying difficulty. From back country dirt roads to elk trails in the mountains. I spose it all depends on how fast I can get my out of shape body to cooperate with me.

The good news is my bike came in today. Gotta wait till Monday to pick it up though.
 
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