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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello fellow transition fans. I'm looking for opinions on 5'8" 125 lb. rider using the latest Double as a bit of an all-rounder. Riding style would be flowy downhill and riding up when necessary, small hits probably not exceeding the size of the jumps and drops at Crank it Up at Whistler. Probably a few extended all-mountain rides, too.

Seems like this is the way a lot of people us the Bottlerocket, so I'm thinking of the double as sort of a mini BR because a bigger bike seems just overkill for someone that small.

What do you think? I know the single ring up front is a concern, but other than that, any other issues?
 

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lots of people ride doubles that way. but personally, the BR is definitely not a big bike, and will open up more terrain with allot less fatigue and a larger margin for error.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I see what you're saying, but I think that for a 125 lb. Adult woman who will never get super aggressive, the bottlerocket is overkill in terms of weight and suspension. I know the double isn't amazingly lighter as a frame, but with air suspension and lighter wheels it could be pretty spry. Anybody out there know anyone short enough to put up the seat and ride the double up a hill? That's what I do with my bottlerocket, and I don't love it but it works. But I'm 6'3". I'm guessing it would feel similar to someone smaller and lighter.
 

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to bad they don't make the syren anymore. My wife really enjoyed that bike.

The new bottlerocket coming out will probably be lighter and has adjustable travel between 5-6 inches. Just run it in the 5" mode with a rp23 BV and it should be perfect for her.

I have learned that trying to make a bike into something its not meant to do will usually lead to mixed results.

Also, if she wants to get into biking then the bottlerocket will give her more room to grow and let her progress faster. It will feel more stable on the DH and be more forgiving on botched jumps and gnarly rock sections.
 

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The double pulls all kinds of duty. I rode one for a whole season at Whistler with mixed results. Lower mountain is good fun, upper is pretty sketchy on the small bike. The new Bottlerocket will be a bit lighter than the current version , but the Double will be the lighter bike in the end with similar builds, obviously the fork will be the big ticket item, maybe a 36 Fox vs a Fox 831 or anything like. They are a blast on flowy trails with jumps its a tough bike to beat.
 

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I'm having the same issue. My wife hauled my BR around last summer and I rode my Tracer. I want to build her something that's a little lighter. Been thinking Tazer but BB is too low. You may want to consider the BB on the Double. Will she be smashing pedals in the technical stuff?
Have you looked for a used Syren?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Thanks for humoring me on this. I think the syren is slightly overkill, too. She's been on a 35 lb 5-6 inch bike for a few years and she seems to be lugging around more than she needs to. The primary use of this bike will be smoother, extended downhill singletrack. Throw in some small DJs, and the occasionally required climb. She has an XC hardtail for the full-on XC stuff. As for the BB height, it's a small concern, but neither of us find much pleasure in exceptionally rough trails, so it's not too big a worry.

In any case, if I went this route what size would be best? Obviously the regular is recommended, but I'm guessing that's on the assumption that it'll be used primarily as a jumper. I was thinking it would add some stability to go with the long, but I think it might be too long in the cockpit. Any thoughts there?
 

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ruppguts said:
Thanks for humoring me on this. I think the syren is slightly overkill, too. She's been on a 35 lb 5-6 inch bike for a few years and she seems to be lugging around more than she needs to. The primary use of this bike will be smoother, extended downhill singletrack. Throw in some small DJs, and the occasionally required climb. She has an XC hardtail for the full-on XC stuff. As for the BB height, it's a small concern, but neither of us find much pleasure in exceptionally rough trails, so it's not too big a worry.

In any case, if I went this route what size would be best? Obviously the regular is recommended, but I'm guessing that's on the assumption that it'll be used primarily as a jumper. I was thinking it would add some stability to go with the long, but I think it might be too long in the cockpit. Any thoughts there?
I think you have the last part confused. Typically the shorter bike would be better for jumping due to the shorter wheelbase. If you are worried about stability then a 4" jumper frame with steep HA and short wheelbase would not be the best option.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
climbingbubba said:
I think you have the last part confused. Typically the shorter bike would be better for jumping due to the shorter wheelbase. If you are worried about stability then a 4" jumper frame with steep HA and short wheelbase would not be the best option.
No, not confused, just didn't explain myself clearly. I was saying that Transition recommends someone under 6' use the regular because, as you said, shorter and more compact would be better for jumping. My question was, would someone who is 5'8" #125 and is primarily going to be riding rolling, smooth downhill with occasional small jumps, benefit from the longer wheelbase (stability), or would it be too long to be comfortable?

All this would be solved by getting at the bike in person, but alas, I don't have that opportunity.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Chad_Money said:
The double pulls all kinds of duty. I rode one for a whole season at Whistler with mixed results. Lower mountain is good fun, upper is pretty sketchy on the small bike. The new Bottlerocket will be a bit lighter than the current version , but the Double will be the lighter bike in the end with similar builds, obviously the fork will be the big ticket item, maybe a 36 Fox vs a Fox 831 or anything like. They are a blast on flowy trails with jumps its a tough bike to beat.
If I may, how tall are you and what size did you ride?
 

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I am a 135lb 5'6 woman. I love my double.

I couldn't afford to own two mountain bikes and my hardtail wasn't cutting it anymore. I loved my previous generation SC Chameleon but modern forks wouldn't clear the downtube so after much cajoling by my friends I upgraded to a fully.

The double is perfect. I have a 2011 talas on the front. I rock the 110 for just about everything and push the travel up to 140 before I point her downhill. The bike has a very small wheelbase. It is intended as dual slalom/dirt jump bike so it will not inspire the same confidence dhing as an sx trail etc. Since I like riding tiny dirt jumpy bikes on the trails the double is ideal for me.

If you also like your bikes tiny or intend only on jumping - then stick with the regular. If you intend on riding this up trails and making it your do it all then you'll benefit from the longer top tube more so than the extended wheelbase. It doesn't sound like you're a dirt jumper/slope style rider so you don't need a tiny wheelbase. You probably won't even notice the difference in "stability" - I didn't.

protip: Buy a long seatpost. The 367 thompson slammed sticks up 3 inches but if you come near to bottoming the shock you will buzz your seat. The longseat
 

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I use my small travel bike the way you plan to (it saw 17 days of the hardest hitting Whistler trails you can find). As a result I destroyed the bushing system (banshee) and ordered myself a Double (actual bushings) to replace my frame so I have no actual report yet, but plan to keep a log on how it fares this year. I do have some experience with the small travel all rounder bike though.

First off, I'm 6'1, (5'11 when I first got my frame). I got a long as I generally like a longer bike and don't dirt jump much. I benefited from any stability it added (along with being very comfortable) without sacrificing much maneuverability because either way it was small travel (light weight and poppy) with short chain stays. The times I did find myself dirt jumping, I still had lots of fun, the bike is also stable in the air, the downside was it was harder to pinch my seat for the no-hander I was trying to learn. If I was super into it, I could see experiencing trouble with flicking it on tail whips and things where a smaller snappier bike would be a benefit.
That being said, the Transition frame is rather long in the large. At 5'8 the large is going to be a bit of a stretch weather you plan to dirt jump or not. 4" of recommended is a fair bit. I'd probably get the regular.
Unfortunately, I don't think the new angle sets can be used with the drop in cup that the Double uses, but stability can always be fixed with a longer travel fork to lengthen the wheelbase and slacken out the head angle. This will also raise the BB so you wont have to worry about smashing pedals. Shorter cranks can always be run as well.

As a side note (not trying to thread steal) are there any other recommendations on which fork to run for the all rounder bike that will see whistler more than once (I saw a few above)? I've been looking at the new Fox Float 140, but am hearing stories of flex with the the smaller axle. The new Rock Shox Revelation looks promising as well, but I'm wondering if I should just take the weight sacrifice of a coil or a larger fork like a lowered Totem or Lyric. I currently have a Pike 454 Dual Air I can't get to work correctly.
 

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Ruppguts - I recently started riding a long Double as my everyday trail bike up here at Galbraith and I love it. I run a 140mm fork with a flush mount lower headset cup and it rips. The slightly slack seat angle combined with the lowish front end leaves plenty of room to stretch out on the climbs, but the cockpit is very comfortable when I'm standing on the way down.

Definitely a long seatpost is in order though. I ran mine with a 350 at first and couldn't get proper leg extension without going over the minimum insertion point. A 410-420 solves that issue no problem though. As long as you're comfortable with a single ring up front, the Double serves dual duty as a trail bike very well!

Edit - I'm 5'8" as well. I spent a couple of days riding the regular frame last year as a trail bike and while there are some benefits of the smaller frame, overall I find the large a lot more comfortable for trail riding applications. If I were strictly a DJ/DS type rider, I might go back to the regular, but not for trails.
 
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