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Quick question--if I reduce the amount of travel in a fork, does that in turn reduce the effective height of the front of the bike? Seems like it should--thanks in advance for all help.

2001 Rockshox Judy SL
 

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tnot said:
Quick question--if I reduce the amount of travel in a fork, does that in turn reduce the effective height of the front of the bike? Seems like it should--thanks in advance for all help.

2001 Rockshox Judy SL
It depends how you go about reducing the travel, but in almost all cases I know of, yes, it reduces the total fork height.
 

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Yes it will..

with your particular fork. As noted it depends on the method. Most modern forks that do not have external travel adjustment, travel is adjusted by adding spacers. These spacers are situated in such a way that they prevent the fork from fully extending. So shortening the travel shortens the axle to crown height of the fork by that same amount that you reduce the travel. Some forks that were never intended to be "adjustable" can be reduced in travel, but depending on the fork design the only way to do it is in such way that it prevents the fork from fully compressing. In that case you'd have the same AC height, but with shorter travel. Not the ideal situation in most cases.

But you're in luck, the Judy SL uses spacers and in such a way as to shorten the AC height as you reduce the travel. :thumbsup:

Good Dirt
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks--I appreciate the advice!

Knew I could count on MTBR...!! Real wealth of knowledge here, best on the web.
 
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