Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
In the rear with the beer
Joined
·
1,314 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So its pretty common for folks to complain about trails, people on trails, bad parts, bad bikes, bad people. Its a real buzzkill. So, I'm curious. Have you seen any acts of kindness recently while riding? Or, have you done any trail acts of kindness yoursefl?

Me: A trail runner, believe it or not, stopped on the other side of a wash and waved me thru. I had already come to a stop and was putting my foot down, when she waved. Maybe she was just tired and used me as an excuse to rest, but it seemed like a nice gesture since she had the right of way and, she capped it off with a smile and a "hi, have a nice ride" once I got over to her side. Same courtesy was extended by another rider later in my ride. (note: 1/2 mile earlier I had stopped to let a group of runners pass...many of whom gave me the stinkeye, so I wasn't feeling much runner love before this).
 

·
Master Gardener
Joined
·
1,347 Posts
Every time we come across another group and we're descending and they're climbing and yet they yield the trail to us unnecessarily (per standard trail etiquette), I consider that a rather kind gesture. And it happens all the time.

So do short conversations about a hiker's dog, or the weather or a simple exchange like "great morning, eh?... have a good one!"... happen far, far more often than any hostile or rude exchanges.

And yesterday at Pemberton I had probably 4 dozen people pass me on the first lap and not only ask if I had everything I needed to change my flat, but also stop and chat for a few seconds and even donate a tube or CO2 cart. And just think of the bad rap that "racers" usually get...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
restoration of faith in humanity...

I am with Velo. Kindness happens to me on every ride - with equestrians, cyclists, and footers. Part of it is the mile-wide grin on my face while I ride. I can't help it. Also, I used to be a long-distance runner. Bro, they don't smile, ever. It's not your fault. The suffering is far easier to endure if you pass a few lazy cyclists, and blame your pain on them.

Once, I was a greenie riding up Shaw Butte for the first time. About half-way up, a drew-peterson-type-hopelessly-unlaid-hopelessly-ugly guy stepped in front of me, causing me to dab, only to ensure that I "know who has the right-of-way". Not killing him is the only regret I have in life. But later, about two-thirds the way up, just as I am giving up, the ghost of John Wayne firmly grasped my shoulder and said "Son, you are almost home. Look at me boy! You can't quit now." I couldn't see his face, the sun shone from behind, creating that orange only-in-Arizona halo effect. He saved my seminal ride, and I was blown away.

I think for every butter-head on the trail, there have been a hundred nice people. But I never, ever ride SoMo (or SoCal), so my experience is somewhat idyllic.
 

·
wretch
Joined
·
2,126 Posts
Be as nice as you can and it feels great when it's returned. Be as nice as you can and get stinkeye or shaking of the fist or head and i'm reaching in my pocket to pull out my "to do list"

There will be people that come here and say its a big city people don't need to say hi or stuff like that. . .blah blah. . .

I really do enjoy smiling, waving, and talking to whomever I come across on the trail, so long as the situation calls for it. Pay it forward right? And when you do come across a NIMBY, Rockfairy, or whomever, give em two big thumbs up, tell 'em they're a winner and ride on brutha.
 

·
In the rear with the beer
Joined
·
1,314 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Bituman said:
Paul B. rescued a doggie on the trail. That's a pretty nice act of kindness.

http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=475034

Bob
That is huge! Good work Paul! and to the others in that thread who mentioned they rescued a dog. My faith in humanity went up one full point on that one. Still trending low though...maybe its just the economy has me down...and the cloudy day yesterday (although it was nice to ride 3 1/2 hours without having to refill my camelbak).
 

·
sprocket
Joined
·
3,184 Posts
bigdudecycling said:
That is huge! Good work Paul! and to the others in that thread who mentioned they rescued a dog. My faith in humanity went up one full point on that one. Still trending low though...maybe its just the economy has me down...and the cloudy day yesterday (although it was nice to ride 3 1/2 hours without having to refill my camelbak).
I spread love and cash to keep a balance in the world. Just like a card company.
 

·
Saucy Size
Joined
·
4,482 Posts
Truckee Trash said:
There will be people that come here and say its a big city people don't need to say hi or stuff like that. . .blah blah. . .
Oh man...my feeling is that, because Phoenix is such a big city that trail kindness -- not just grudging etiquette -- is needed here more than ever. Not because bikes are gonna get run off the mountain (they're not) or because someone's gonna get sued (probably not), but because it just makes the park a nicer place to ride.

When I came down Javelina and saw a group of hikers wearing t-shirts with Ghostbusters-style "NO BIKES" logos printed on them, that bummed me out. I'm sure they weren't happy, either.

When I came down Javelina and stopped and chatted with the gal with seven trail dogs (on leash) and learned each of their names, that made me happy. Hopefully it made her happy as well.

It's not like the big city parks are going to see fewer people any time soon.

p.
 

·
livin' the dream......
Joined
·
1,954 Posts
I've had many more positive encounters than negative ones. For example, when I see equestrians out at McDowell, I go out of my way to yeild and compliment them on thier beautiful horses. It always breaks the ice in that last 20 foot gap as they approach me. Just yesterday I was working my way up Windgate in MSP when a volunteer steward held his hiking group up to let me pass.

Instead of a nod and riding through, I stopped and chatted with them. The steward was joking that he was sure that I had just passed them, I joked back that we all dress the same, so it's tougher to ID us. All smiles and good vibes, some of the snowbird hikers were asking about riding, etc.

My last deal is hooking up a bro on the MMP long loop at the end of the summer. He was without a tube with 2 miles to go, so I hooked him up and rode out with him as he was having some other issues with his bike. He thanked me for hanging with him as it was already 95 degrees and he was worried about being out in the heat.

There are other stories, you get my drift...............:thumbsup:
 

·
Old Fat & Slow
Joined
·
72 Posts
Broken chain

I was hiking with my wife one afternoon a few weeks ago and came across a bike patrol member pushing his bike back toward the trailhead. I happened to be wearing my camelback and had my tools with me. Out came the chain tool and in a few minutes he pedaled off,
 

·
Pivotal figure
Joined
·
6,361 Posts
Obvious question; why do bike patrol and not carry tools? :confused:
It's always good to help out anybody in need. Things have a way of coming full circle...
 

·
Old Fat & Slow
Joined
·
72 Posts
The bike patrol guy forgot his tools. Oops on his part.
Since I was the hiker, I guess the better question is, "Why didn't I take all that stuff out of my camelback so I wouldn't have to carry it around?"
 

·
Pivotal figure
Joined
·
6,361 Posts
I'm just as bad with taking stuff out of my pack. I've been snowboarding and went to adjust my bindings only to find that I'm hauling a multi-tool, pump, tube,etc... Everything BUT the little tool for my board. That was safe on the shelf at home :p
 

·
Salty Dog
Joined
·
366 Posts
I see 'mostly' positive stuff on pretty much every trail I ride, but then again I try to be first with a greeting, and to slow down for anyone else, hikers, horsers, bikers or whatever. It sure makes a difference, and most times it gives me a reason for quick break to get my heart rate back into Zone 3.

Generally speaking, there is nothing to be gained by anyone out there being nasty, but it does happen. Most times I just throw it off as someone having a bad moment in life. If I'm not racing at the time, and someone needs help I will do so. A race however, without injury involved, and the other person is pretty much on his own, unless (s)he is a teammate.

I think most problems between mountain bikers and hikers occur when the mtb person is riding fast, under control, but the hiker doesn't realize it. Best to just slow down and give them a bit of psychological comfort.

I had a brief interlude with a guy on a bike path in Scottsdale recently. I normally don't ride bike paths, but happened to be doing so this one Sunday. The guy was shirtless, no helmet, talking on his cell phone. When I started around him he swerved into me, startled himself, and nearly crashed. I made a suggest as to what he could do with his cell phone. Common sense just doesn't always occupy some of the gray matter out there.

Did I mention that when I was injured in the Tonto National Forest I got a great helicopter ride? $15k and no video... wups, I seem to be rambling...
 

·
livin' the dream......
Joined
·
1,954 Posts
15K? How does that work? I thought those rides were "free"

What agencey few you out? Just curious.........you'vre obvioulsy okay now if you are posting!;)
 

·
Salty Dog
Joined
·
366 Posts
No, it wasn't free. It was a hospital helicopter unit. Air Evac, I think. Private company out of California with offices in Phoenix. The rescue crew and meds were publicly funded. The flight was not. Yup, I'm doing fine. It will be two years on February 4th. But recovery from a broken femur is much more than I thought it would be.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top