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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just picked up my bike last week, KHS Alite 1000. I already got some shorts, lights, & a computer (useless). Today I got a helmet, gloves, & a lock so I can secure it in my truck if I decide to run in a store on my way to or from somewhere I want to ride. I went to 3 different lbs today & browsed after getting my afore mentioned items. A little rundown on my planned riding, street/paved path mostly, some easy trails. I'm out of shape but working at not being. These are my thoughts as of now or what I'm using.
1 hydration pack; using bottle now
2 seat bag to include a. Spare tube & patch kit b. Pump c. Energy bar/sustanance d. Multi tool
3 bike cleaning supplies/lubes ie:chain scrubber or brushes, degreaser & lube (open to suggestion)
That's all I can think of off hand for the riding I'm doing now. With my attitude & lust for things it won't be long to work into the long list I already found here. I just don't want to jump the gun & have things for more serious riding when I'm not doing it. I average 3 miles a day when I ride, for now. I would post pics but I'm using a smartphone & I guess I'm not that smart yet.
 

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mikeb121973 said:
I just picked up my bike last week, KHS Alite 1000. I already got some shorts, lights, & a computer (useless). Today I got a helmet, gloves, & a lock so I can secure it in my truck if I decide to run in a store on my way to or from somewhere I want to ride. I went to 3 different lbs today & browsed after getting my afore mentioned items. A little rundown on my planned riding, street/paved path mostly, some easy trails. I'm out of shape but working at not being. These are my thoughts as of now or what I'm using.
1 hydration pack; using bottle now
2 seat bag to include a. Spare tube & patch kit b. Pump c. Energy bar/sustanance d. Multi tool
3 bike cleaning supplies/lubes ie:chain scrubber or brushes, degreaser & lube (open to suggestion)
That's all I can think of off hand for the riding I'm doing now. With my attitude & lust for things it won't be long to work into the long list I already found here. I just don't want to jump the gun & have things for more serious riding when I'm not doing it. I average 3 miles a day when I ride, for now. I would post pics but I'm using a smartphone & I guess I'm not that smart yet.
if you get a hydration pack, the seat bag isnt very useful . I keep everything in my camel back, unless I ride my road bike, which i use a bottle and seat bag. Bike cleaning,ge a set of this brushes, realy nice to have and relatively cheap, but onlyuse them when the mud dry, that way youcan easily brush it off. Chain cleaner is good,make sure you get one with side brushes that cleanthe side of the chain as well. Chainlube depends on your riding conditions...me in summer,pedros ice wax,winter Finishline wet lube.
 

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The combination of a a SRAM magic chain link and a tub of camp stove gas makes for a cheap chain cleaning set up. Youre going to need chain lube. I used regular gun oil and it made a mess :(

Ive been cleaning the bike with a paint brush and a rag after rides. It's pretty dry here in Socal. Dont brush the shock stanchions. The brush has metal bristle holders. I also bought a 3 dollar can of silicone oil to lube the shock shafts.

For a more thorough cleaning, about once in two weeks, Ive been using my car wheel brush and some turtle wax car wash soap I already have. Together with a tooth brush, it gets the bike real clean.
 

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Why don't you like the computer?

What type of lock? Many are easy to pick/break (see Youtube). Not saying your lock will be bad, just place less faith in it than you might expect to.

The seat bag you are describing will be enormous. Try these:

Get a frame pump.

Get a velcro strip and securely attach the tube to your seatpost (fold it a few times).

Multitool with a chainbreaker (good models can be had for $20-30... think Topeak and Park). You probably want a powerlink or two (see if your chain is compatible first).

If you are considering hydration paks and don't plan on going on multihour epic journeys, think about a Camelbak Hydrobak- smaller, lighter, less of a sweat lake on your shirt. I've found that I can get about two hours of hard riding in the summer with one fill - not much room in it for much else though- so you'd need a bag.

I have a tiny bag, it fits my keys, small patch kit (with 2 levers), multitool, and a powerlink.

Take your cellphone (for emergencies), and think about writing your name, address, next of kin, blood type, etc. in the helmet (might have a sticker provided) for dire emergencies.

Finish Line is my lube of choice (but I don't take it on rides), I also swear by the Park Tool Chaingang cleaner.
 

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I'm really not trying to be a smart ass but, Just get on the bike and ride. I don't want to jinx myself but I can't remember the last time I got a flat on the steet or path. On a 3 mile ride you could just walk back. If you really want to be prepared, put a drink in the bottle cage. I too can get caught up with tinkering on the bike, adjusting, oiling, then get the gear on, load up the back pack, then the car, then oh [email protected] I forgot something, drive back. Don't do it. Open the garage door, get on the bike and go. Save the drive to the path for a special occasion, or ride the bike to a path. Again I'm not trying to be a wisenhimer but it sounds like your putting more energy into preparing and running around to the lbs's than the pedals. I mean, If your trying to get into shape, I hope you atleast ride the bike to the lbs.
Just my 2 cents
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I thank u for th advice so far & hope it keeps coming. Riding to the closest lbs will require months of my riding to get in shape to do so. Its approximately 25 miles one way. Yes, I can walk back on short rides. Right now I'm trying to get used to riding a bike with multiple gears. The reason I posted my question was because I don't want to get caught up buying things I don't need for my short jaunts down my road. I lives out in the middle of nowhere in s.c. & there are old fire breaks, logging roads, assorted trails galore that I can explore. I mentioned going else where to ride because I like a change of scenery. I'm 37 & its been roughly 22 years since I've ridden a bike.
 

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mikeb121973 said:
...I'm 37 & its been roughly 22 years since I've ridden a bike.
I'm older and it's been longer, same boat but have an old loaner and waiting to get out...necessary repairs! Already had a flat, weird using those levers to remove the wheel and refitting it into the disc brake!
 

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mikeb121973 said:
I thank u for th advice so far & hope it keeps coming. Riding to the closest lbs will require months of my riding to get in shape to do so. Its approximately 25 miles one way. Yes, I can walk back on short rides. Right now I'm trying to get used to riding a bike with multiple gears. The reason I posted my question was because I don't want to get caught up buying things I don't need for my short jaunts down my road. I lives out in the middle of nowhere in s.c. & there are old fire breaks, logging roads, assorted trails galore that I can explore. I mentioned going else where to ride because I like a change of scenery. I'm 37 & its been roughly 22 years since I've ridden a bike.
Just get on and ride, its only 3 miles. I think you are selling yourself short but if you really can only ride 3 miles maybe you should see a doctor before you do much more and make sure you are not going to have major problems. My wife and I are both 42 and have not been on a bike for over 20 years. Our first trip down a paved trail was 6 miles and we stopped only because the seats and handle bars were killing us. Once I adjusted things the next 2 days we road over 15 and ride at least 15 3 times a week. We have been riding for 2 weeks now and ya im 6' 10" and 325 lbs so im a big boy.
 

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A little warm up before, and stretching after, will help with recovery.
As far as the getting used to the gears, if my wife can do it, trust me, anyone can. Ha Ha. Just remember your right hand is rear for both shifting and brakes and IMO should be all you need for now for the type of riding you plan to do.
It's the first few miles that are the hardest. For me, my most common ride it to a park which is about 1.7 miles away, where there's trails and paths. The loops at the park are like 3-4 miles long. My first loop is always the hardest, by the 2nd, or 3rd loop. I'm just cruisin', So it's kinda like climbing a provebial hill. The begining of your ride being the bottom. Once you go a few miles, depending on your level of MENTAL and physical preparedness, you start nearing the top. Then, when you feel like that's all you got, you've reached the summit and start heading down the other side, and if you keep going, pedaling becomes easier.
On rides by myself, I find earphones a big plus to keep me motivated. If I'm feeling good, The music's going, the sun is shinning, the mileage is growing, [email protected] I might just keep going even with a flat, LOL
I'd recommend you do a little riding first, before buying any gear, to see what you think you would like, or what might come in handy.
Cudos to you for starting your endeavour. Now get out and ride.
 

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BTW a hydration pack is only necessary if you drink more than 20 oz of water.

In SF, I rarely go through a bottle because the temps are under 60 year round. Anywhere else in America, I would need a minimum of 70oz.
 

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I bought a camel-back and I never use it anymore, except for epic rides over 4 hours.

I find that if I hydrate a few before the ride, the water bottle is adequate and does not make my back sweaty :)
 

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I've made it a rule to carry all my gear all the time. At one point or another I've ended up using all of it. Most of my rides are 2hr aggressive trail rides.

I put it all into my tiny camelbak, which is about this size but not this exact one: http://www.rei.com/product/748126

- cell phone
- multi-tool
- spare bolts of various sizes
- small washcloth
- spare tube
- plastic tire levers
- hand pump

Sometimes I'll also bring my backup digital camera, especially on group rides. Cellphone cameras tend to suck ass. Also on group rides, somebody in the group is guaranteed to bring no gear at all so it's nice to have this stuff available.

I've had 2 flats this summer, riding 3-4 times per week. I'm too lazy to do the math but... flats happen, so you may as well be prepared.
 

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InlawBiker, I tend to lean towards your advice; btw what kind of tubes do your use?
I haven't even hit a trail yet and had a flat (old everything & getting leaky fork fixed)...I bought one of those thorn-proof monsters. My buddy said they're too heavy, too much rolling weight.
 

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Those slime tubes are very heavy. I like whatever tube they have at the LBS. A thorn that is big enough to puncture your tire is probably going to be able to put a hole in your tube.

If you are mainly riding the road and no trails you can get that air pressure up higher. That will decrease the chance you pinch flat on a curb or other hard object you go over. There's always tubeless. You can open up that can of worms with a search on here.

BigSharks' advice is good. Wrap a bike tool up in the tube with your tire levers and velcro it to the seat tube. They make a commercial version of this but velcro bands can be found everywhere.

Those 3 mile rides will eventually turn in to 10 mile rides, then 20, then 30. You just have to start where you can then slowly work it up. Don't get discouraged at your mileage just yet and be sure to work in recovery time between rides.

Keep at it.
 

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I'd like to add that if you use headphones on a bike path please just put them in your right ear. I can't count how many times I've yelled "on your left" to someone with both earphones in. They don't hear you and suddenly drift left and freak out as you try to come around them. It will keep you and other people safe.
 

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Tim-H said:
I'd like to add that if you use headphones on a bike path please just put them in your right ear. I can't count how many times I've yelled "on your left" to someone with both earphones in. They don't hear you and suddenly drift left and freak out as you try to come around them. It will keep you and other people safe.
I hear ya, no pun intended. I keep the volume low and been riding with earphones for 20 years with no issues. If it's crowded or a narrow trail, I just wouldn't use them. I wouldn't blame the earphones, some people are just too rude to be courteous to others that's the problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I decided to order a few things today: pump, hydration pack, & some degreaser & chain lube. My 3 mile rides that I'm making now are just to get used to riding a bike again & to work up to 10,20,30 mile rides. Next week I will find me some sort of multi tool & tire levers, extra tubes, & then go from there. Maybe I will never use some of this stuff, but if I need it or want to use it I will have it.
 
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