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carolinaviking said:
Is that a good thing or a bad thing?
Bad, in the general scheme of things. Weight shifts off the rear of the bike when pointed downhill and/or braking. This unloads the rear shock, which is already topped out at static, thus increasing the bump force required to activate the suspension.
 

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carolinaviking said:
What sort of rear suspension design does not do this?
The NRS is unique -- it is the only suspension design I know of that is set up at zero sag. Most bikes call for anywhere from 25% to 33% suspension sag.

Based on suspension design and shock setup, other bikes will have differing braking qualities when pointing down a slope. All bikes have to face this unweighting of the rear wheel. But none have a topped out shock & fully extended suspension to deal with.

When I bought my NRS, I was looking for an efficient bike. Unfortunately, I let that pendulum swing too far for my requirements for an all-around trailbike. Undoubetedly, the NRS suspension does work exactly as advertised, and the bike pedals like a hardtail on fast terrain. It's just that in going down, and in some respects when going up, it wasn't my cup of tea.
 

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I saw an aftermarket rocker arm from SGF components on Ebay and then read some posts about them in this forum...have you tried them or considered them? Sounds like they boost the travel and make the ride more plush, but I don't know if they allow you to add sag to the suspension and thus eliminate the frozen rear when braking. I'd be interested to know.
 

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No, I never tried them.

You'll still be required to set the bike up with the shock topped out. The suspension is designed so that pedaling forces attempt to extend the suspension, thus keeping it immobile on smooth terrain and countering any tendancy to bob.

By introducing sag into the system, you'll notice the shock beings to yo-yo with each pedal stroke as chain force works to extend the linkage.

Another problem I saw with increasing travel on the NRS was the relatively high suspension compression ratio I was dealing with. Increasing travel requires greater air pressure in the shock, and I was already running close to max. Of course, this wouldn't be a problem with a lighter weight rider, but I was a svelt 240 pounds at the time (not fat, just big boned!).

The guys that ran the new linkages seemed to really like them. But at the time, it seemed like quite a few of us here on the boards were trying to find ways to soften up the NRS suspension be it through aftermarket linkages or experimenting with different shocks (I wound up using a Cane Creek AD-12 on mine).

But like I said, I'm not trying to talk you out of buying one -- just making sure that you know what the NRS is all about. It's a light, agile, purpose built XC racing machine, and not the trailbike some try to turn it into.
 

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carolinaviking said:
What sort of rear suspension design does not do this?
The nw Maestro designs from GIANT work quite well and unfortunately the Trance is the only experience I personally have w/ FS bikes besides the POS I had before it.
 
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