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Been training for 3 1/2 years, still a fast sport/slow expert. On my easy week, I know i am suppose to cut down my hours but can I take two days off in a row?? Or can I take off 3-4 days off in the easy week?
 

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The Punk Hucker
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The longer you take without riding, the longer it will take to get "back to speed".

Riding at a slow pace is most effective for recovery & maitaining fitness.

You can take the whole week off if you like, but chances are you'll lose 2-3 days getting back on track afterwards.
 

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it all depends on you as an athlete and how your body responds. nobody can help much without following your numbers for a while.

personally, i am trying to incorporate swimming into my training. my off days are now lap swimming instead of off. good cardio work, little stress on my legs, and it has the bonus that i can hop in the hot tub afterwards!

basically experiment and see what works for you.
 

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1 or 2 days off is more standard. 3-4 seems like too much.

When looking at the Friel book, at 350 annual hours, R&R weeks will be 4 days of riding. Once you jump to 450 annual hours, then it's 5 days of riding. I believe most Expert racers train around and over 500 hours.

I've had a couple of coaches in the past give me either 5 or 6 days of riding on the R&R week. And it depends on the training cycle (3-1 vs. 2-1) and some of their personal philosphy. Depends on the training load of the build week. I think it also depended on Masters racer vs. non-Masters. It also depended on available time and doing the things off the bike that gave the capability to handle the load.

So the answer is........"it depends."


BTW, I'm not a coach. But I did sleep at a Holiday Inn Express last night. ;-).
 

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Well it all depends... The purpose of a rest week or regeneration week is to dump fatigue from previous training and set you up for upcoming training.

I almost always start a rest week with 2 days completely off the bike, then a short day with a little intensity, active recovery or zone 2 (depending on how much truly need to rest) another off day and then head into the weekend.

You have to rest harder than you train in order for the body to adapt to the stresses you've placed upon it. Half-ass your rest weeks and you'll won't be fresh enough to really train your hardest when it is required.
 
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