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Fo' Bidniz in da haus
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Being new to Ti issues, I have a question.

I just bought a Ti hardtail frame that I am building up. Here is the dumb part.......for the seatpost, does the material matter since the frame is Ti? In other words, can I use Alumnimun, Carbon, or Ti for the seatpost without problem? Figured I would ask since I am in the process of now buying parts......man, buying parts for a new frame is like potato chips, you cant control yourself to limit it to just one at a time.....

Cheers
 

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This actually isn't a dumb newbie question at all. You should use anti-seize between your seatpost and frame no matter what material they are. I've heard that a ti/ti combo isn't as bad as a ti/aluminum or ti/steel combo. At any rate, use anti-seize, not just grease to coat your seatpost. You can buy the Finish Line ti prep from any bike retailer or go to your local auto parts store and buy any anti-seize or copper grease. Heat ranges aren't important since its only a bike. HINT: If you go to an auto parts place its is WAY cheaper.

In fact while I"m at it, technically you should be using anti-seize for all non-moving contacts (stem, seatposts, etc.). Grease should be used for moving contacts (bearings, etc). To over-simplify, anti-seize is basically just grease with suspended soft metal pieces in it. In reality grease usually works okay for everything but as long as you have a big thing of anti-seize you should use it. I hope this helps!

Also, if anybody has anything to correct in here please, speak up! I'm just regurgitating what I've learned from others.
 

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A wheelist
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FoShizzle said:
Being new to Ti issues, I have a question.

I just bought a Ti hardtail frame that I am building up. Here is the dumb part.......for the seatpost, does the material matter since the frame is Ti? In other words, can I use Alumnimun, Carbon, or Ti for the seatpost without problem? Figured I would ask since I am in the process of now buying parts......man, buying parts for a new frame is like potato chips, you cant control yourself to limit it to just one at a time.....

Cheers
What Gabe said plus........if you go with a carbon seatpost, don't grease or anti-seize it. My Ti frame - a Seven Cycles - comes with a carbon fiber insert in the top of the seat tube so no seatposts need lubing.
 

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"El Whatever"
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What they said and...

As a general advice: when you bolt different materials (Al to SS, SS to Carbon Steel, Ti) ALWAYS use antiseize.

SS, Ti and Al have a nasty tendency to seize which is almost incredible... especially if you're not good with the torque wrench.

This should not apply to CF as Mike said. With CF you should avoid overtorquing and sharp edges.
 

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inner peace to make peace
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get a good ti. seat post or a Thompsons al. post

get a "good" ti. seat post (like from Dean or Moots), unless you can only afford a Thompson al. seat post.

Thompson makes al. seatpost you can trust. do not go "economy" on seatpost. if you can afford carbon seat post then you can afford a good ti. seat post.

i'd NEVER buy a carbon seat post, but then i weigh 190+#s and i descend on some downhill courses on my steel hardtail (yes, I do crash alot). i've already have bent two al. seatpost (but not Thompson's) and have bent on ti. seatpost (but bending ti. seat psot isn't as scary as al.). Carbon seat post will be strong and light and tres fashionable, until it snaps with little or no warning.

no one needs another hole "down there"
 

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TrailNut said:
i'd NEVER buy a carbon seat post, but then i weigh 190+#s and i descend on some downhill courses on my steel hardtail (yes, I do crash alot). i've already have bent two al. seatpost (but not Thompson's) and have bent on ti. seatpost (but bending ti. seat psot isn't as scary as al.). Carbon seat post will be strong and light and tres fashionable, until it snaps with little or no warning.

no one needs another hole "down there"
I'm a clyde and I guess I just don't see myself being in a position where a carbon seatpost would really snap, they are pretty strong, I opted away from a carbon flatbar but seatpost I was like yeah whatever, could someone show me some instances where this would really be a problem??? I just can't see it...
 

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Ride Instigator
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Carbon Post...

Carbon&Ti_Guy said:
I'm a clyde and I guess I just don't see myself being in a position where a carbon seatpost would really snap, they are pretty strong, I opted away from a carbon flatbar but seatpost I was like yeah whatever, could someone show me some instances where this would really be a problem??? I just can't see it...
I weigh 200 and ran a Easton CT2 post on a HT for a couple of years and then had it on my FS for a while. The only prob I had was with the rails slipping back in the clamps, nothing to do with the carbon of course...just a crappy clamp design. I replaced the CT2 with a Thompson and the CT2 has found a home on my Ti road frame (where carbon belongs).

The only possabilities of problems with clydes on carbon posts that I can think of are if a frame design requires that the post extends out a long way or if you have a very slack seat tube angle.
 

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I guess because of my riding style I would think this would be less likely to happen to me as the only time I am in the saddle is road work or like fast singletrack, anything bumpy I usually post and crank away... so maybe I should just replace my seat post every 2 years? or maybe see if I can find an alloy (Ti maybe) post that weighs close to a carbon one.
 

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Grease is fine, except on carbon -- I recommend Shimano Dura-Ace

I personally wouldn't go with carbon with a seatpost only because I have this phobia about the thing snapping based on a real horror story I heard--which I wont go into.

DON'T GREASE A CARBON SEATPOST OR ANY CARBON COMPONENT!!

You don't have to go Ti on the seatpost--which would actually be more likely to cause siezing than less, but the risks of that happening if you maintain your bike correctly are virtually nil.

The Thompson Elite seatpost is highly praised and seems to have earned its laurels for design and function. You can check out the reviews on this site.

I wouldn't go with steel if you're going to be replacing the seatpost. Get something good instead. Steel has a tendency to warp, and any metal weakens when it's bended in any way.

In any case, you can use grease on the seatpost and that will work fine as both an anti-sieze and for dampening vibrations and creaks. I recommend Shimano Dura-Ace grease for all non-moving parts that need greasing--which is a whole other thread but very easy to do yourself. All greasing should be done yearly unless you ride thousands of miles per year or in truly harsh conditions like those which exist on the planet Venus or Mars on a bad day, in which case it should be done roughly every six months.

Ride it like you stole it!
 
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