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The story is: My front rotor was dragging, so I removed the pads, inspected the innards, determined the piston was stick, and tried gently to push it in. No luck. So I pumped the levers few times...and out drips some fluid (the bike was upside down at the time, I'm not sure if this was dumb of me or not). Anyway, the fluid definitely got on the inside of the caliper, and now there is clearly air in the line, as the levers go to the handlebar and do nothing.

My question is: do I need to more than bleed the line? I.e, will the caliper, becasue it had fluid in it, need to be disassembled, cleaned, rebuilt, replaced, or what?

Thanks for your help.
 

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squirrellyrabbit said:
The story is: My front rotor was dragging, so I removed the pads, inspected the innards, determined the piston was stick, and tried gently to push it in. No luck. So I pumped the levers few times...and out drips some fluid (the bike was upside down at the time, I'm not sure if this was dumb of me or not). Anyway, the fluid definitely got on the inside of the caliper, and now there is clearly air in the line, as the levers go to the handlebar and do nothing.

My question is: do I need to more than bleed the line? I.e, will the caliper, becasue it had fluid in it, need to be disassembled, cleaned, rebuilt, replaced, or what?

Thanks for your help.
I would try the re-bleed first as it is cheap and easy. I would be more concerned WHERE the fluid came from. Did it come from the caliper because you pumped the piston out so much that it ejected one of the pistons.

A caliper re-build is actually quite easy as well, and you can examine the pistons to determine if you need to just replace the seals, or the pistons as well.
 
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