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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, one of my Dad's crazy old buddy collects roadside steel, aluminum, etc and recycles for extra cash. He finds this by the curb with some other "junk" and loads it up. My, not so nimble at 78, Dad sees it on his truck and tells him he wants it to ride. Luckily he realized that was a bad idea and has had it sitting for probably 2 months outside of his tool shed. I'd known about it but didn't look closely until yesterday. I saw mongoose and figured Walmart junk. Then I saw the shimano and araya rims. Hmmm, a quick google check and I figured it was coming home with me! Pops offered it actually, first.

Right now I've got $0 in it other than the tires and seat which I already had. Amazingly it shifts perfectly, and everything is in good shape. Rear wheel had some loose spokes and needs a little truing. I think I'll get a little learnin' on it as its not something I've really done before. Even the old Kenda mtb tires were still holding air.....It'll be a path bike I'm sure but am almost considering going SS with it.

I will be disassembling the whole thing for cleaning and a refresh but it is totally rideable as is! On pavement anyway...I wouldn't brave a real trail with it just yet!

 

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Phobia of petting zoos.
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Nice score. Not sure of the year of that one, but I almost bought one in 1993. They had a good geometry, assuming of course it fits you.

Get the rear wheel sorted, make sure the brakes and shifting are all good, make sure no bearings are munted, saddle, tyres, grips and I would have no hesitation in taking that on the trails.

With the rear wheel, just bring the loose spokes up to tension. A drop of oil in each spoke nipple will help then turn if they're a bit stuck. Pluck the other spokes and "tune" the loose spokes as you tighten them to the same pitch of close to it. Then you can use the brake blocks as a guide for final truing if you don't have access to a truing stand.

Grumps
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Grumps! Ive found very little info on these but have pretty much confirmed now that it is a 1989. The bb shell is stamped M9D, which according to a site I found on Mongoose id, indicates "Taiwan,1989,April". Also with that, a few matching examples posted by others. It seems the fork is not original with others having straight blades. The rest seems quite stock though.

I think I will probably go the SS route with it but will remove everything properly so it can be returned to mostly original if wanted. I know it doesn't have any real monetary worth either, even so I'm going to fight my urge to powder it and make it "shiny." As scratched and worn as it is, I still think it tells a better "story!"
 

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Team Brooklyn
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Great bike, great geometry and great deal!
One of my favorite rides.
 

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Schipperkes are cool.
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Yep, '89 for sure. I built a lot of them at Exeter Cyles in NH.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Cool, so the site info was correct. This bike still has a Town and Country Bicycles, Milpitas, CA sticker on the seat tube.. I'm outside of Atlanta GA, so it's made quite a journey!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
From the '89 Mongoose ATB/BMX catalogue:

Thanks! I've seen a few posts with the catalog but never saw the Comp pictured.

Since I have the attention of those with first hand knowledge...Any idea why this one might have the curved forks? Assuming they are stock and not replacements for damaged stockers, anyway. It is an 18" and doesn't seem it would have tire to down tube clearance with straight blades. Maybe just the larger frames got straight ones?

***edit- looking closer I think Ive answered my own question and am pretty sure they've been replaced.
 

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Any idea why this one might have the curved forks? Assuming they are stock and not replacements for damaged stockers, anyway. It is an 18" and doesn't seem it would have tire to down tube clearance with straight blades. Maybe just the larger frames got straight ones?
Rake on both forks would be (approx.) the same, difference being the offset is from the curve in the blades on one and the angled offset of the blades at the crown on the other.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Rake on both forks would be (approx.) the same, difference being the offset is from the curve in the blades on one and the angled offset of the blades at the crown on the other.
Yes! That's part of what I couldn't visualize.. My mind couldnt "see" the angle of the blade vs the steerer tube. Kinda bummed these aren't original. The straights look cool!
 

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Sergeant Spandex
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An IBOC Pro was my first "real" mountain bike, I rode it all over Marin while i was in school and then I gave it to a buddy when I moved to Florida figuring my MTB days were over.
 

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I see this and think bullet proof commuter. Fenders, rear rack, lights if needed, done.
Tires of choice naturally.
 

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Team Brooklyn
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Build it to ride like it was the race bike it was meant to be :)

Here's my '89 John Tomac Signature as it was in early '90 and as it is now:

image.jpeg
image.jpeg

It'll make an appearance at the 2017 Keyesville Classic where ill race with it once again.
 

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Phobia of petting zoos.
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I see this and think bullet proof commuter. Fenders, rear rack, lights if needed, done.
I see this and I think "old school trail fun bike". That's too cool to put out to "light duties".

It's like taking a 69 Camaro, pulling out the 350 and dropping in a stock 6, narrow treads and a stock exhaust just so you got something to drive to church on Sundays. Okay, maybe not like that but hey. :)

To each their own!

Grumps
 
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