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Double-metric mtb man
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Hi gang,

Working on lacing up my new wheels (Pro II / XM819) here tonight and I came across an interesting note. Mavic recommends that the braking spokes on disk hubs be on the outside of the hub flanges...but most wheels I've seen and most "how to" manuals have them on the inside.

Do people actually reverse the braking spokes (a la Mavic) or does it matter? Shiggy, Roger M, comments please :)
 

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Psycho Mike said:
Hi gang,

Working on lacing up my new wheels (Pro II / XM819) here tonight and I came across an interesting note. Mavic recommends that the braking spokes on disk hubs be on the outside of the hub flanges...but most wheels I've seen and most "how to" manuals have them on the inside.

Do people actually reverse the braking spokes (a la Mavic) or does it matter? Shiggy, Roger M, comments please :)
It makes no difference these days and all my wheels are built braking spokes on the inside.

This method did have an advantage in the early days of disc brakes where the original calipers were on the large side. The front caliper ran close to the spokes and under braking the inside lacing tended to pull the spokes away from the caliper under braking torque. Done the other way around the spoke would tend to push outwards and clip the caliper under heavy braking. These days there's plenty of clearance so both methods are fine.

I doubt Mavic has a logical explanation for their recommendation, in fact all wheel component manufacturers are never the best source of wheelbuilding information IMHO :)

--
Roger
 

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Braking spokes should be on the outside to make the wheel slightly stronger laterally while braking. Because braking forces are stronger than pedal forces (try pedaling while braking), you want to load those spokes on the outside so the wheel is most stable.

Most how to's are based on rim brakes, which don't load the hub or spokes, thus the only forces on the hub and spokes are pedals forces.

How this translates into the real world? I'm not sure, but I'd guess its minimal.
 
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