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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys

I'm having one of those bottle gone times.
I ride in the UK 210lbs running fox 32's forks, usually have them set to 100lbs pressure.
I read the set up thread and went down the lower pressure set-up for the forks which is
great on the flowing trails.

However they compact on the steep technical trails which have small drop offs.
Now every time i see one i bottle it having been over the bars a few times.

Do I need to up my skill level or change the setup and run a higher fork pressure to cope with slow technical decents?

Cheers Phil
 

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EDR
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You need to get your ass behind the seat more keeping the torso more or less level (as possible) while letting the bike drop down. If there are choppy/baby head rocks at the landing you may need to "push'' the front end into them using your arm and upper body strength, forcing the wheel over them instead of stalling and going OTB.

About your fork...you need more compression damping. Does the 32 have a high speed compression damping adjustment? If so crank it up for the drops. If not use more air pressure to fight the forks urge to blow through it's travel.
 

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I too was timid on my 575 going down the steeps.

I found that a 36 float rc2 helped. The TA and stiffness at the brake (180mm) helped the most. Keep your weight back and drop that saddle a few inches. Sometimes less is more. If I do too much or think too much that is bad, let the bike do most of the work. It also helps to watch a smooth rider go first.

I never put 100# in my 32 float. I weigh 200#. It sounds like you are hitting front first, try to hit both wheels or rear a bit before the front. If it is a slow roller, get way back and that should help the OTB sensations.

Rob
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
cheers guys

I have 15mm TA on the new fox 32's so its a lot stiffer.
Today i ran 115lbs in the forks and it went a lot better today. The bike also just went over a pathway full of rocks.

Thanks for the advise.

cheers phil
 

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Brit on a trip
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I totally understand where you are coming from, having similarly struggled to get a Talas to work well in all situations. If you are running it soft and it sags during a steep descent then the most ciritical objective is to unweight the front wheel as much as possible at the moment it touches down.

If the front wheel is carrying a lot of weight or is subject to braking as your weight comes down onto it, that is the moment it is most likley to pull a stoppie and put you OTB. As you roll off a step down get your weight right back and as low as possible (You can sometimes bruise your chest on the saddle whilst bucking down a severe rocky chute) and get right off the front brake until you are safely through the danger point.

By rolling with the front really light and free of braking it will ride higher with more of the available travel and tolerate a lot more in the way of obstacles without jamming against them. With weight right back and low you can do more braking with the back wheel (without skidding!) which helps keep the front light.

Having said that - here is what not to do - this step had to be rolled and stopped dead as the trail switched savagely to the right (it is much steeper and tighter than it looks in the photo). You can see that the fork is completely compressed as maximum weight and braking force comes onto it - and there is a little rock under the tyre at just the wrong moment too :eekster: All that is a recipe for an OTB, avoided on this occasion because it was so obvious - come over the edge as slowly as possible and weight as far back and low as possible. If it was a straight line and rolled faster and with no braking then it would only have used about half the travel



Thanks to DurtGurl for the photo - captured the moment perfectly:thumbsup:
 

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Brit on a trip
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"Goat Camp? "

Nope - Corona De Loma. A very fine descent indeed. If you haven't tried that one yet then it is definitely overdue:) The corner is near the bottom with a big step down on the inside into a hard right turn. We did it again on our recent trip and, with a coil Pike up front this time, it was a lot less on the edge.
 

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575 sweet spot?

Hey G, I understand that you may be coming out for AZSF?
I've found that my 575 does have a "sweet spot" that is slightly behind the seat. Not a full blown get your butt behind the seat, but what eatdrinkride chats about. I messed all around with the suspension settings, and kept the pressures high for about a week and decided to keep things spec on.
Then came experimenting with riding position. I commonly got well behind the seat on decents to avoid the dreaded otb. While this worked, it was overkill, since at anything over a couple of mph, it becomes sketchy. I slowly started bringing my rear back onto the saddle on decending. I set my seat position back, about 1/3 or less of the seat stays show in front of the seat post clamp. That helped. Then came finding a nice little netural spot that allowed me to regain better control in descents at speed. I became comfortable in the technical bits with just moving back to where my thigh/groin area was touching the back of the seat. At first this felt really exposed because of the potential of the seat slamming directly into my groin, but really the thighs are doing the protective bit by actually holding the seat in place. Couple this with an aggressive upper body moving that front wheel exactly where you want.
I think this little detail of riding style came from the fact of riding motos. Controlling a 230lb bike in the same terrain as we like to ride MTB, there is a lot of using the thighs to grab the seat and tank for control and a heavy dose of upper body wrangling the front end.
As your photo shows the dreaded start from a stop and drop, wanting to pop and flop... not, I'd probably be way behind my seat, making sure my front wheel was not going to find something to stop me dead in the trail. You would trust this line, right?
 

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Yeti Rider,

There are a number things you can do to improve descending on any bike.

1. Fork spring rate - as you mentioned is one way to make your bike handle better on steeps. You mentioned that you run 100 psi for your 210 rider weight. I'm only 165, but usually run 80 psi in a fox 32. 100 psi doesn't seem like a lot to me for a 210 rider.

2. Compression and Rebound damping - As others have mentioned you can also increase your compression damping, but this will only help so much if you don't have the right spring rate (air pressure) to begin with. Don't forget rebound too. So many bikes come into my shop with way too much rebound damping. This won't allow your fork to return to it's proper height btwn impacts.

3. You can run more sag in the back of the bike. The front to rear balance of your bike is even more important than either end individually. I've raced DH for 12 years and been setting up pro dh bikes 6. We always run a lot more sag in the back than the front.

4. Stem length - If descents are important you may want to run a shorter stem. Getting your hands behind the front axle is a huge benefit when descending. If you are currently using a 100 - 120mm length stem then going to a 70 will make a huge improvement.

5. This should go without saying, but I assume you lower your seat height for technical descents. Don't laugh a lot of riders feel uncomfortable without their seat up high because that's all they know, but after a day of descending you learn to use a low seat height to your advantage.

Good Luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Scott

Thanks for the info.
I'm running an 80mm stem.
Fork pressure is now 115lbs which seems to work better.
I'll reduce the shock pressure for a plush ride,
I've reduced my seat height over 1/2 an inch, it did feel weird at first, but i don't think i've lost a lot of power but the bike feels better.

Cheers Phil
 
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