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a.k.a. MTBMaven
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I demoed a 575 yesterday. For those who know the area I rode Aliso Woods, which was beautiful yesterday. About 75 degrees, light breeze, blue skys, the ocean looked perfect, and every thing is green right now.

So on to the ride. The bike was a medium 575 with RP3 and Talas RLC. Components were a mix a XT and XTR. Carbon bars and really nice Hayes 9 Carbon (I think that was the model). I had a few issues with the set up. Issue 1: There was too much grease on the post so it kept slipping early in the ride. After wiping the grease off on the grass that was cool. Issue 2: This one really sucked, the tires were 2.1 Maxxix High Rollers. Now I ride 2.3 front and rear on my Enduro, so 2.1s were WAY too small. I'm going to switch out the 2.1s for some 2.3s for my ride on Sunday before I return the bike. Oh and I felt like the bars were too narrow. The tires made the front end feel squirrelly.

Ups:
The best thing I noticed on my 3 hour ride was the ability of the 575 to climb. That damn thing climbed like a goat. I pedaled up rocky sections like it was groomed dirt. Compared to my Enduro the 575 climbed like a hardtail when you needed to transfer power to the ground and like a perfect suspended bike when you needed to climb over loose rocky stuff.

Downs:
On the downs I need a bit more time to make a full decision. There's lots of promise so I'm not too worried I'll like it. I think the tires were really working against me. The brakes were really strong. The rear tire was installed backwards. The combination of small tires, installed backwards and strong brakes made the rear tire lock up a bit too easily. The bike felt stable otherwise. The thing I noticed was the bike seemed very nimble. It was easy to kind of throw the bike around under my body. This was always my big problem with my Enduro. The Enduro felt like a rock you just pointed downhill and hung on to. Which would be great if it had an inch or two more travel, but with 5" front and rear one needs to maneuver around things. I was able to fling the 575 around much easier. That was really a nice change I'm looking forward too.

Jumps:
There this little 3 foot jump to a fairly flat landing along the trail. I was jumping off it the last time I rode the trail with my Enduro. The 575 felt stable but not quite the same as my Enduro. I think things like the narrow bars and skinny tires might have something to do with it. Plus I've been riding my Enduro for like 4 years almost every weekend, so it fits me like a glove.

Based on the ability of the 575 to climb like a goat and the ability to fling the bike around while riding I'm really looking forward to getting my own 575. I think the issues I have with the demo bike can be taken care of by changing out some parts when I get my own. I'll try to post my second ride thoughts after my ride on Sunday.
 

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No, that's not phonetic
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mtnfiend said:
I think the issues I have with the demo bike can be taken care of by changing out some parts when I get my own.
Along with some real tires try a fork which can be set a bit taller too. A travel adjustable Pike or Nixon would be perfect. It will make the bike noticeably more stable. The Foxes are about as short as you want to go on the 575. It makes for a sporty ride, but sometimes you just want to space out on the descents. It's like having two bikes in one when you can dial the ride you want.
 

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a.k.a. MTBMaven
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
PIKE Upgrade

I'm planning to follow the path of several before me by using a the PIKE Team on my 575. I know you're not the biggest fan of the Team though. I'll give it a shot a see if I like it.
 

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a.k.a. MTBMaven
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
2nd Ride

I'm in love. I rode the Yeti 575 again today. My first impressions was that the 575 climbed like a goat, which still holds true. Today I fell in love with it's ability to decend. I cleared stuff I've been trying to clear for some time now. This section of trail is basically all rocks, tons of vertical loss, with tight switchbacks. I rode the trail last weekend and didn't clear any of the really rocky section and went over the bars on one of them. Today I cleaned them all. The 575 just tracked exactly where I wanted it to go and eat up the bumps.

For those in the SoCal area I was riding in the Chilao area between Horseshoe Meadows and Chilao on the Silver Moccasin trail. If you been up there recently the trail is in bad or great shape depending on your perspective. I like to think it in great shape personally.
 

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Bad Case of the Mondays
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Quattro said:
How is the braking performance in the slow rocky descents compared to the Enduro? Any stiffening on the Yeti?
This is my biggest concern with the 575 too. I haven't gotten to demo one yet (two weeks away), but I've heard the 575 is technically a single pivot.

I'm riding a single pivot now, and my biggest complaint is the stiff suspension under braking so I don't want to upgrade to a new frame just to have the same tendencies. Everyone says the 575 climbs well so that isn't really a concern to me, just would like to know more about how it descends and how the braking affects the suspension.

When comparing the 575 to the other two bikes I'm leaning towards (5 Spot, MotoLite) is seems like the clear value winner.
 

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a.k.a. MTBMaven
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Braking

I didn't seem to notice any change in the performace of the suspension due to braking. I did notice that the rear wheel had a tendancy to lock up really easily. I just attributed that to different brakes that were brand new and the Hopes on my Enduro have really old pads.
 

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Adventurous Hacker
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No Problems Here

Prior to getting my 575, I spent some time on a Rocky Mountain Element. I loved it for the most part, but there was some serious brake jack--On technical descents, I may as well have been on a hardtail half the time. Enter the 575--no such issues, somewhat to my surprise. To be honest, I'm not what you would call an accomplished technical rider--the 575 allows me to do things I couldn't do before and to stretch myself by trying new things I wouldn't have considered previously. In the hands of a better rider, the bike is truly something to behold.

I've always liked climbing and was leaning toward the AS-R SL, but after a test ride, I realized I gained much more in technical capability and descending than I was losing in climbing and on the flats. I have to echo everyone else's assessment that the way this bike climbs is just sick for a bike with so much travel.

Hopefully your demo will include some rough descents so you can assess suspension performance while braking for yourself.
 

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www.derbyrims.com
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mtnfiend said:
I didn't seem to notice any change in the performace of the suspension due to braking. I did notice that the rear wheel had a tendancy to lock up really easily. I just attributed that to different brakes that were brand new and the Hopes on my Enduro have really old pads.
I resently demoed the 575 too. I'm spoiled now for it's light weight, great climbing and handling. Actually it's the first bike I've ridden that I can really say that the improvment in performace for technical trail riding is significantly better compared to my Tracer's very high quality balance. There would be no loss in performance in any area, and much improvement in rougher terrain.

Braking is very good. There may be slightly better braking bikes, but much of that is subjective and dependent on the ability of the rider and of the rear brake to modulate easily.

- ray
 

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a.k.a. MTBMaven
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Climbing With Anchors Attached

It was interesting this weekend. My first ride I had thsoe little 2.1 Maxxis High Rollers with no tubes on it. The bike was really responsive on climbs. So on my second ride I put these 2.3 Maxxis Mobster dual play DH casting tanks on to try and get a better ride going downhill. I was successful in increasing downhill performance; however, it was like climbing while dragging a boat anchor behind me. On this 1/4 very steep sandy hill I really noticed the extra weight. It must have been an extra 3-4 pounds of extra tire (at least it felt like that much). This climb was not technical and rocky like the other climbs so I can't really speak to the 575 retaining its wonderful climbing ability. But damn those things were heavy.

I'm planning to put a 2.5 Kenda Blue Groove front and and a 2.3 Kenda Nevegal in the rear, both with folding bead, and I'm going to try and run them tubeless with Stans. I think this will keep the weight down but give good grip and control. We'll see.
 

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Bad Case of the Mondays
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mtnfiend said:
I'm planning to put a 2.5 Kenda Blue Groove front and and a 2.3 Kenda Nevegal in the rear, both with folding bead, and I'm going to try and run them tubeless with Stans. I think this will keep the weight down but give good grip and control. We'll see.
I just went from a Schwalbe Jimmy 2.1 to a Nevegal 2.1 StickE Rubber(considerably wider than the Jimmy), and I've been noticing the drag on the climbs. The StickE rubber will climb up anything, but man does it roll slow. I've only got 4 rides on it, so I'm hoping I get used to it, but don't expect the Nevegal to roll much better, if any.
 

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Trail Rider
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derby said:
I resently demoed the 575 too. I'm spoiled now for it's light weight, great climbing and handling. Actually it's the first bike I've ridden that I can really say that the improvment in performace for technical trail riding is significantly better compared to my Tracer's very high quality balance. There would be no loss in performance in any area, and much improvement in rougher terrain.

Braking is very good. There may be slightly better braking bikes, but much of that is subjective and dependent on the ability of the rider and of the rear brake to modulate easily.

- ray
This bike looks like the candidate to replace my Tracer. It is the perfect weight and travel for a good performance trailbike. I'm concerned about the rear carbon flex pivots.They look well engineered,but I 'm thinking they might fail and I'd have to send the rear end in to be repaired.

I've come to the conclusion that sometimes, my old low single pivot outclimbed my Tracer under certain conditions(very steep & rocky). My Tracer climbs well,but shines in the steep,rocky,slow DH terrain. This use of the new shock technology and the leverage
sounds like they've got a great performer
 

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Quattro said:
This bike looks like the candidate to replace my Tracer. It is the perfect weight and travel for a good performance trailbike. I'm concerned about the rear carbon flex pivots.They look well engineered,but I 'm thinking they might fail and I'd have to send the rear end in to be repaired.

I wouldnt worry about the carbon pivots, this frame has been out now for atleast one year, and there hasnt been one post to date that has any frame or pivot problems. I have had mine for just about one year now, and it is still perfect.
 

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Regarding the discussion of the 2.1's vs the larger, heavier tires... Let me throw in another option: I'm running a 2.25 Geax Blade up front and a 2.25 Geax Sturdy on the rear, and love them. 2.25 might sound fairly small, but they are large air volume tires, so they have more cush than the average 2.25 (more than the 2.3 Ritcheys I was running on my previous bike). They're light (folding bead), roll well, don't pack up with mud (as I discovered in a downpour Saturday), and seem to stand up to sharp rocks and roots.
 
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