Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
696 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here it is folks, my first build attempt ever. The 'spec sheet':rolleyes: is as follows:

-free doner bike (horay for Craigslist)
-new-ish used Truvativ FireX cranks and BB (thanks to the guys at NRC in Kyle, TX)
-no-name aluminum riser bar to replace the stock steel one (NRC junk bin)
-donated Shimano STX brake levers (Thanks, Aaron. aka: bikerboy)
-new cables
-new Nashbar SS kit (tensioner, spacers, cog)
-Shimano 505 clipless pedals, from my misc. parts drawer
-WTB grips, from my misc parts drawer
-mis-matched used no-name F & R canti's
-mis-matched tires (old Trek Z-Axis 2.0 front, IRC Mythos XC 2.1 rear)

I just got back from it's first real shakedown ride. No problems to report yet. It was only about 30-40 minutes long and not 'too' intense, but it sure did work my legs out a lot more than my 4x4 gearie would have. I may play with the gearing to see if I can do without a tensioner. The rear cog wrap is pretty extreme right now but it never skipped onthe climbs even with my 6'3" 215lb butt standing and mashing on it. The chain now runs VERY close to the lower chainstay, but doesn't quite rub. I might move the rear cog inward 1/16" just to be sure.

Any suggestions for improvements, etc?
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
696 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
pacman said:
Suggestions - if the chainline is straight leave it. If the chain starts to rub the chainstay then its wearing out.
Plan to buy a steel SS chainring.
No, what I meant was, because I'm pushing the chain so far up with the zip-tied tnesioner, the outside of the chain is almost rubbing the inside of the chainstay. I half-link might fix this problem as well, by taking up some of the slack, so that the tensioner's idler wheel can be well below the lower chainstay and still keep the chain tight. The only half-link I have is for a different sized chain. I'll get a new one next week.

That chain and rear cog are brand new. Like 10 miles on them, max.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
696 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
salimoneus said:
yea that cog wrap is a bit extreme, a half link should do it

looks clean!
Ha! Thanks. You should have seen it when I brought it home. Chain was rusted SOLID, tires were literally crumbling the dry rot was so bad. It took some time and effort to bring it back to life, but not a lot of cash. I don't think it turned out oo bad for a completely neglected bike manufactured in 1990. Sure was a fun project.

Hmmmm......what's next?

I've got a mild 2 hr ride planned for 7:00pm tonight with my wife and a couple of frineds. Hopefully I can keep up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,887 Posts
hey just because i apparently started the biggest flame war in history in the other thread, doesn't mean i can't appreciate the clean look of an SS. in fact i think there is nothing sweeter looking than a steel hardtail SS :thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
696 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Last night's first 1.5hr ride through Walnut Creek was great. I forgot how quickly rigids accelerate and how well they climb. Although this bike is far from a featherweight (maybe 25 lbs?), it's still considerably lighter and more flick-able than my fully.

My 1" threaded headset started to loosen toward the end of the ride and fealt a little sketchy. Small jumps and drops were making me nervous that I might snap the damn fork off under my 215lb weight. :eek: It was double checked before I left too, and if anything, it was a little too tight. I'll check into what might have caused it to loosen up tonight.
 

·
Looking to Start Racing
Joined
·
185 Posts
salimoneus said:
hey just because i apparently started the biggest flame war in history in the other thread, doesn't mean i can't appreciate the clean look of an SS. in fact i think there is nothing sweeter looking than a steel hardtail SS :thumbsup:
I guess that proves that you really are high on yourself....and a troll.

Nice Trek. I'll be following suit, as soon as I can find a 17" 1996 Green Trek MTN Track.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,887 Posts
TREK 4 Life said:
I guess that proves that you really are high on yourself....and a troll.

Nice Trek. I'll be following suit, as soon as I can find a 17" 1996 Green Trek MTN Track.
no all it proves is that FORM != FUNCTION

but let's not drag that into here and get off topic.

yea, nice Trek :thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
Yup, it's fun building a budget SS

I also converted an old steel hardtail, a Rockhopper that's a similar vintage. Lucky for me the dropouts are semi horizontal and can be run without a tensioner.

How do your cantis stop? Mine are pretty worthless, the pads are hard and glazed up. I'll replace those first before putting on a pair of v-brakes and levers. Better stopping power might be your first upgrade. Otherwise, there's no need to change what's not broken.

edit: that quill stem is pretty high, but I think it'll bend before it breaks so you'll have plenty of warning.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
I had the same problem with mine

hallin222 said:
My 1" threaded headset started to loosen toward the end of the ride and fealt a little sketchy. Small jumps and drops were making me nervous that I might snap the damn fork off under my 215lb weight. :eek: It was double checked before I left too, and if anything, it was a little too tight. I'll check into what might have caused it to loosen up tonight.
It's been years since I worked a threaded headset... I forgot that two wrenches are necessary. Otherwise, you can't get it tight enough and still have the bars turn. If you're only using one wrench it will loosen up on every ride.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
696 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
BundokBiker said:
I also converted an old steel hardtail, a Rockhopper that's a similar vintage. Lucky for me the dropouts are semi horizontal and can be run without a tensioner.

How do your cantis stop? Mine are pretty worthless, the pads are hard and glazed up. I'll replace those first before putting on a pair of v-brakes and levers. Better stopping power might be your first upgrade. Otherwise, there's no need to change what's not broken.

edit: that quill stem is pretty high, but I think it'll bend before it breaks so you'll have plenty of warning.
Those canti's aren't all that bad. I can't get too much speed on that rig anyway, so I think I'm just going ot leave 'em. It's a big improvement over my first ride were I rode it with only a rear brake. THAT was sketchy.

I'm waiting on a quill adapter from my LBS so I'll be switching the stem soon. And I'm pretty sure I'd snap that stock one before it bent ,as it's just a heavy, ugly chunk of (presumably) porous cast aluminum that I shot with a quick blast of matte black paint to make it more tolerable to look at until I can replace it.

Damn, this late night at work has made me put off the headset adjustment and follow-up ride until tomorrow. This bike will probaly see some slow and inexpensive upgrades in the future, but I'm pretty proud that I got it cleaned up this well and trail worthy for such a minimal investment. My wife's already on the lookout for my next project bike, as she's the one that found and picked this one up for me. God love her.:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
696 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
BundokBiker said:
It's been years since I worked a threaded headset... I forgot that two wrenches are necessary. Otherwise, you can't get it tight enough and still have the bars turn. If you're only using one wrench it will loosen up on every ride.
I tried that. Two wrenches, I mean. But the probelm is that I don't have a standard open-ended wrench that big, so I had to use an adjustable (aka: 'round-all') and it's so thick, that it makes it difficult to get the lower nut without interfering with the upper one of vice versa. I'll mess with it some more tomorrow.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top