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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been riding a 5-Spot for 4 years now and really like the bike, but... 2 years ago the right chainstay cracked at the weld, and 2 weeks ago the seat tube cracked at the weld of the main pivot. First issue was a free replacement, second cost me $500 cause the bike was out of warrantee. Still, Turner fixed me up (while on the road) so I'm pretty happy with their customer service but while waiting on the new front triangle to arrive I started looking at other options... like the new Yeti 575... perhaps sell the 5-Spot while the main portion of that bike is still brand new... I was wondering if anyone here, with a 5-spot or 6 pack, has spent any some time on a 575 and what did you think of it? Any input is appriciated...

(I ride a large 5-spot with an older TALAS up front and a DHX in the rear, I like technical riding both up & down but don't drop anything beyond 1-2'... )

thanks...
 

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Bite Me.
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There are numerous threads comparing the 575 to the Spot, although most probably relate to the older 575 not the new frame. The new bike is improved over the old, stiffer and a bit lighter. The 575 is very capable ride, but there are a few design issues that put it below the Spot IMO. The cable routing is second rate - the frame design forces the front derailleur cable to run under the BB shell like a road bike. There it's prone to picking up dirt and mud as well as getting smacked by rocks. The rest of the routing is also on the down tube and along the chainstays and wraps around the BB/tube joints - just weird and also prone to contamination and damage. Turner's cable routing and linkage is just cleaner IMO. There's also the bushing vs. bearing debate. Finally, I found the alignment between the rear drop out and the BB shell to result in pretty wide chainline - the get a decent middle ring/big cog alignment, I ended up running the crank spacers on the non-drive side to move the cranks closer to the BB shell - there was just too much cross chain on the stock set up. That's not such an issue if you just run 2 rings and bash guard. All in all, the 575 is really nice ride. It can be run as a big AM/FR bike with a 160mm fork or lightweight XC/Am rig with a 140mm fork (but the same can be said for the Spot). Yeti is a pretty good company to deal with, but when you start getting up into the price range of the Yeti and Spot, it's the fine details that distinguish the bikes - Turner comes out ahead IMO.
 

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cooldaddy said:
I've been riding a 5-Spot for 4 years now and really like the bike, but... 2 years ago the right chainstay cracked at the weld, and 2 weeks ago the seat tube cracked at the weld of the main pivot. First issue was a free replacement, second cost me $500 cause the bike was out of warrantee. Still, Turner fixed me up (while on the road) so I'm pretty happy with their customer service but while waiting on the new front triangle to arrive I started looking at other options... like the new Yeti 575... perhaps sell the 5-Spot while the main portion of that bike is still brand new... I was wondering if anyone here, with a 5-spot or 6 pack, has spent any some time on a 575 and what did you think of it? Any input is appriciated...

(I ride a large 5-spot with an older TALAS up front and a DHX in the rear, I like technical riding both up & down but don't drop anything beyond 1-2'... )

thanks...
What, Turner diden't replace it for free, how does that fit with Turner's legendary CS? I thought they fixed everything for fee. ;)

Options for good bikes are plenty out there. The new Yeti looks really nice and there have been many comparisons with the spot. The Knolly looks good, so does the Titus EG.
 

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I agree with cutthroat. I'll try not to play favorites, since I actually have always liked the 575 and I see people brutalizing them beyond their intent. Now the 575 has had its share of failures as well. One thing that makes me weary of the Yeti is the rear end. I noted the flexiness in the old one, but don't know how much the new one has fixed it. Additionally, the carbon stuff turns me off.

If I'm not mistaken, you likely got one of the newer front ends with thicker seat tubes? You'll likely not have a problem with it. I would stick with the spot, to be honest. It's something you know and if you had the tri replaced, it's going to be good to go.

Additionally, I have to agree with cutthroat on the pricing. I'm not digging Taiwanese pricing matching American pricing.
 

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The new 575s are noticeably stiffer in the back than the old models. I rode a friend's 2006 as well as a new carbon version that I built up for a buddy, and I could feel the stiffer design just hammering up and down the street. You don't have to get the carbon back end (and who would?), the aluminum is $100 or so cheaper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
yes I got what I believe is the beefier seat tube, with longer pivot section & weld. see attached.

reasons for lusting over new bike:
1. break my bike on Sunday, leave a message for Turner, start wondering if they would have a replacement frame in my size, for the old rear-end
2. open latest BIKE magazine: favorable review of nice looking new 575
3. mmmmm the new 150 Q15 from Fox would work nice with that...
4. internet at hotel shows that the 575 in Large has a 1" longer (horizontal) top tube length - nice, I could run a shorter stem...

anyway, I didn't realize that the 575 is made in Taiwan, not that that is a problem, but aree with comment about pricing...



Jerk_Chicken said:
I agree with cutthroat. I'll try not to play favorites, since I actually have always liked the 575 and I see people brutalizing them beyond their intent. Now the 575 has had its share of failures as well. One thing that makes me weary of the Yeti is the rear end. I noted the flexiness in the old one, but don't know how much the new one has fixed it. Additionally, the carbon stuff turns me off.

If I'm not mistaken, you likely got one of the newer front ends with thicker seat tubes? You'll likely not have a problem with it. I would stick with the spot, to be honest. It's something you know and if you had the tri replaced, it's going to be good to go.

Additionally, I have to agree with cutthroat on the pricing. I'm not digging Taiwanese pricing matching American pricing.
 

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There's absolutely nothing wrong with changing bikes just for a change. You've been on the Spot for a while, if you want to try something new, go for it. You can always go back to a Spot. This is a sport for fun after all.
 

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Roy said:
There's absolutely nothing wrong with changing bikes just for a change. You've been on the Spot for a while, if you want to try something new, go for it. You can always go back to a Spot. This is a sport for fun after all.
"Wrong thinking is punishable, right thinking will be as quickly rewarded. You'll find it an effective combination."
 

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If you want to change, here is THE list:

Endorphin (Active under braking, heavier, stiffest, fantastic)
Mojo (Active under braking, fastest, lightest, prob least durable over the years- probably climbs as well or better than the Endo- nowhere near as stiff as the Endo though on fast courses, none of the others will keep up with equal riders and equally weighted bikes/wheels, DWL is fantastic, the frame itself has potential to improve but still impressive).
Spot (Great all-rounder, very stiff and durable, great balance, easy shock removal, grease-able bushings are sweeeet!)
Ciclon (Ditto as Spot- climbs slower, descends a bit faster, solid but bobs the most- not the fastest, easy shock removal)
575 (very good all-rounder but a notch below the others in most areas, best value option IF you can get it for a few hundred less than MSRP)

I say if you want something new and something different, the Mojo or Endo will be the top choices. The suspensions are incredible.
 

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I was in a similar position earlier this year, the UGI bug bit me as I was looking at the new crop of longer XC/AM forks and the revised geometry of the newer Spot so I decided to sell my beloved 03 Spot. I've always liked the 575, great ride and as others have said can be a very capable long travel XC machine or built burlier for bigger stuff. I could have easily bought one of those, but I went with another Spot.

A few things that steered me right back to Turner:

Cable routing -- as mentioned its not very elegant on the 575, but its not a deal breaker.

Bushings vs. Bearings -- after owning Turners for the last 5 years I love the zerk system, and there are plenty of threads on maintenance, but when I refinished my Spot I replaced the 3-year-old bushings just for kicks, they really didn't need it - the rear was tight and uber-smooth - and it was a snap.

Tire Clearance -- this is a big one for me because sometimes I like to run some really big tires, I can clear 2.5 and 2.7's with ease - the 575 is much tighter in the rear.

Customer Service -- Turner's is second to none, I would check on what it would cost for you to replace an out of warranty front or rear triangle on the 575 as a comparison, but I don't think $500 is unreasonable when you look at the overall cost of the frame.

The Ride -- for me Turner has nailed the geometry, I love the way my bike handles and I'm very happy with the new Spot vs. the old Spot.

FrankenTurnerAbility -- because so many parts are interchangeable, you have the chance to do some pretty interesting things like mate a Highline rear to a Nitrous front so you can build a 8" travel, 23lb XC super-duper machine. :p Seriously though, there are lots of possibilities with shocks and rockers and such.

These points are really just a bunch of nit-picking as both are proven to be great rides and most are very happy with them. Isn't it great to have so many options? :thumbsup: That's the fun of the sport...
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
great input & same applies to the other posts. Just to clarify, I didn't think the $500 replacement charge was unreasonable and the fact that the frame has been improved in the area where it broke is reassuring. But having a mostly new frame with new bushings, stickers and a nice new badge makes you stop for sec and wonder; maybe I can sell this for a decent amount while it looks "new" and use that $ for something new...

anyway, good feedback :thumbsup:

AK Chris said:
I was in a similar position earlier this year, the UGI bug bit me as I was looking at the new crop of longer XC/AM forks and the revised geometry of the newer Spot so I decided to sell my beloved 03 Spot. I've always liked the 575, great ride and as others have said can be a very capable long travel XC machine or built burlier for bigger stuff. I could have easily bought one of those, but I went with another Spot.

A few things that steered me right back to Turner:

Cable routing -- as mentioned its not very elegant on the 575, but its not a deal breaker.

Bushings vs. Bearings -- after owning Turners for the last 5 years I love the zerk system, and there are plenty of threads on maintenance, but when I refinished my Spot I replaced the 3-year-old bushings just for kicks, they really didn't need it - the rear was tight and uber-smooth - and it was a snap.

Tire Clearance -- this is a big one for me because sometimes I like to run some really big tires, I can clear 2.5 and 2.7's with ease - the 575 is much tighter in the rear.

Customer Service -- Turner's is second to none, I would check on what it would cost for you to replace an out of warranty front or rear triangle on the 575 as a comparison, but I don't think $500 is unreasonable when you look at the overall cost of the frame.

The Ride -- for me Turner has nailed the geometry, I love the way my bike handles and I'm very happy with the new Spot vs. the old Spot.

FrankenTurnerAbility -- because so many parts are interchangeable, you have the chance to do some pretty interesting things like mate a Highline rear to a Nitrous front so you can build a 8" travel, 23lb XC super-duper machine. :p Seriously though, there are lots of possibilities with shocks and rockers and such.

These points are really just a bunch of nit-picking as both are proven to be great rides and most are very happy with them. Isn't it great to have so many options? :thumbsup: That's the fun of the sport...
 

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As much as I love my 5spot, 2 breaks would be very frustrating, regardless of how good the CS. I know all bikes can (and do) break, but that is still no fun, to say the least.

The first thing is to figure out if you were simply unlucky or more of an RFX kind of rider.

Beyond that keeping or selling the 5spot would be a hard decision. I think the 5spot, esp. the 5.5 spot, is one heck of a bike. The times I've ridden a 575, I thought it was OK but not great. I also don't fit well with Yeti's sizing. The other bikes that appeal to me are ones I have yet to ride (interestingly). The Knolly Endorphin seems like a very interesting option. Supporting Knolly fits with my interests, and the bike looks to be an outstanding ride, perhaps riding somewhere between the 5psot and RFX, based on my read of feedback.

The other bike that appeals to me is one I would never buy. From what I have read, I would like the mojo for its zoom zoom and active but pedalicous suspension. I would never buy it because based on how (finesse is NOT my middle name) and where (rocks, rocks, rocks) I ride, I don't think a CF frame would be a good option.

So I hang out and try to not look at ventanarama's endorphin pics. :D However, in the meantime, my 07 5spot wows me bigtime. :thumbsup:
 

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cooldaddy said:
great input & same applies to the other posts. Just to clarify, I didn't think the $500 replacement charge was unreasonable and the fact that the frame has been improved in the area where it broke is reassuring. But having a mostly new frame with new bushings, stickers and a nice new badge makes you stop for sec and wonder; maybe I can sell this for a decent amount while it looks "new" and use that $ for something new...

anyway, good feedback :thumbsup:
I wasn't trying to make it look like you were complaining about the replacement charge either, just sharing thoughts -- all is cool. Blue Mountain's summary is short and on the money, if you want to try something new go for it, if you want more/better of what you already have try the 5.5 Spot. FYI, the new Spot picked up more than just travel, its a little burlier than the original 5.1 Spot. I guess after 2 failures I'd probably be a little paranoid when it comes to dropping so much $$$ on a new frame, but I haven't had any issues ... knocking on wood. Also looking at some of the pics people post - I know the bike is capable of far more than my riding skills or neuticle size will put my Spot through - so I'm good to go. Good luck with your search and be sure to let us know what you decide. :thumbsup:
 

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...seems like a lot of peeps who've manages to break a Spot more than once moved up to a 5-pack or RFX with good results.
I'd have to wonder if a Yeti would really do any better...
 

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I agree with what has already been said. A few things that turned me off of purchasing a 575 after a long demo on one. 1) Falling to rising shock linkage rate bothered me. Despite messing with air pressure and varying sag amounts (20-35%), I could feel more harshness around sag than my XCE (even with 1.75" less travel). 2) 575 doesn't allow you to run a coil shock. The DHX-A sucks, so don't go there. 3) Coming off my XCE, the lateral stiffness of the older design 575 was noticeably more noodley. 4) The downtube routing of the cables was loud. The full housing would slap the thin-wall downtube and it would amplify the rattle. They had those little rubber housing c0ck ring things, but it didn't help.

I'm splitting hairs here. They are both top-notch bikes and I have friends that ride and love their 575's, so just decide if any of these factors that have been mentioned are important to you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I think I've simply been somewhat unlucky with frame failures. Turner "accepted" the first failure (chainstay cracked at the weld) in a way that told me that they had seen it before, and when I received the replacement front triangle for the second issue it was clear that there had been an issue with the main pivot area as they changed the seattube design. This is exactly my experience with my previous bike, a SC Superlight. I was probably a little heavy for that bike at around 190 lbs but after replacing 2 swing arms SC suddenly totally redesigned it and made it stronger (lots of failures?). Even at 200 lbs fully loaded I consider myself a fairly smooth rider and I don't do any large drops or ride through boulder fields and stuff so to me a bike like the RFX is simply too much for me, at least at first glance; too much FR, not enough XC...

Interestingly, while at Over the Edge I noticed the Knolly frames but didn't really check them out. The Endorphin looks very interesting on paper but at over 7 lbs and over $2200... I dunno, totally different bike than the new 575... The Ibis Mojo; not interested in it, simply does nothing for me and I would be too afraid to scratch all that expensive material...

Mmmmm Endorphin, thanks for planting that seed... :D
 

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never spent time on a spot but rode next to one today and it really looks great. I ride an 06 575 (the flexy version;) ) and I agree that the workmanship on the spot looks a little better and may be cable routing as well. I also agree that you can not run coil on a 575 and it can not take a 2.7 tire. The only suggestion I have is that the two bikes looks very different and probably ride differently. Which one performs better:confused: , , one needs to try and decide.
Wish you luck with your decision but there is no right or wrong here, just demo one and decide if you like it or not.
Oh yes, the Yeti is welded in Taiwan;)
 

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I have not spent too much time on a 5 spot either - i have ridden a friend's a handful of times, but i have a 575 and love it - it think that with bikes of this quality, the differences are pretty much nit-picking (not that there is anything wrong with that) - i would be happy with either of these bikes as they are both superb - i just like my 575 better :)
 
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