Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

Registered
Joined
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
No proper way that I found on the youtube which solve brake rotor rubbing.
All the video keep on teaching same methods all over again....now my methods...it may not be perfect but this the way i solve it....

1) You will need 2 set gap gauge, clean off the oil from the gauge.
1945825


2) Loosen the caliper bolt & snub it in tightly between pad & rotor. Left & right side must be same filler amount. Eg: 1 side use 0.4, the other must be same.
While pressing brake lever, torque the caliper bolt slowly.
1945826


3) Not the end. Keep the gauge in there & dont remove it. On the lever bleed bolt, remove it & press the lever. Some oil will come out coz most of time we overfill while bleeding.
1945827


4) Wipe off leaking oil. While holding the lever, fit & torque back the bleeder bolt.
1945828


5) Remove the gauge at the caliper & squeeze lever till it stiffer again. Set the lever travel & you are done.
1945831


It may not be the perfect method but it do work. Many times we tend to overfill when bleeding caliper. So brake rub will occur.

Try it. .
 

Registered
Joined
1,161 Posts
Looks like you've found your own slightly different way of doing things. 馃槑馃憤

I don't have two sets of feeler gauges so I use a Shimano bleed block to put the correct amount of fluid into the system before I go about centering the caliper.

This I do by squeezing the caliper onto the rotor by pressing the lever then gently tighten the caliper bolts enough to secure and try to avoid caliper moving at the same time. If the caliper does moves a little I find re-setting even clearance by eye works just fine for me.

As long as the rotor doesn't flex, I get a good positive lever feel and a reassuring sound when the pads hit the rotor I'm happy it's just right. 馃獧馃獧
 

Registered
Joined
521 Posts
There's multiple ways to set brakes to not rub, I find just looking and holding it with my hand while I tighten it down carefully in place only takes seconds. The thing I have to critique about your method is that you shouldn't be draining any fluid out, that's only going to cause problems.
 

EAT MORE GRIME
(銉庎矤鐩娻矤)銉庡健鈹烩攣鈹
Joined
8,323 Posts
using the correct bleed block
and manufacturers stated bleed procedures for [brake model]
I find it impossible to overfill or get anything wrong.
 
  • Like
Reactions: driver bob

Registered
Joined
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
There's multiple ways to set brakes to not rub, I find just looking and holding it with my hand while I tighten it down carefully in place only takes seconds. The thing I have to critique about your method is that you shouldn't be draining any fluid out, that's only going to cause problems.
For tektro brake usually will have 1 drop or none fluid out and as for shimano I will re-add some oil back.

using the correct bleed block
and manufacturers stated bleed procedures for [brake model]
I find it impossible to overfill or get anything wrong.
Agree that with using manufacturer block remove all the hassle but I have few bikes & only having "universal" block which often causes overfill.
 

Single Track Mind
Joined
1,046 Posts
I always use the proper bleed block and recommended technique to bleed my brakes. Then, I loosen the caliper bolts, center the caliper, and use the Hayes gauge. I then lightly torque the caliper bolts without squeezing the lever. Pull, the feelers and check for clearance. Sometimes, a re-adjust is necessary, but in most cases the rotor will clear the pads. Then, I squeeze the levers tight and torque the caliper bolts to spec. This has been my technique for many, many years with very few issues. I wouldn't suggest the whole bleed screw step. Not sure what that accomplishes except that by losing fluid, one also loses power.
 

BOOM goes the dynamite!
Joined
6,809 Posts
Hayes Gauge?
Was just about to say something like this. Works every time.

There are generics on amazn and fleabay for a couple bucks if you don't want to spend the ~$20 for the Hayes. They look something like this and work well enough. I think I paid like $4 for 3 in case I bent one, but never have.
1946414
 

Registered
Joined
1,184 Posts

Class Clown
Joined
3,834 Posts
I just throw some white paper on the ground so I can see the gap easily, then adjust the 2 caliper bolts. I never need to mess with the oil inside the system. You may need to reset the pistons sometimes if 1 gets stuck.

For rub if it's minor it will usually sort itself out through use, or you can bend the rotor slightly.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top