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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
on my training rides to do my first solo 24, i seem to always feel like poo at about 5 hours of riding. after that, i usually feel a little better. the last ride was abouot 10 hours in duration, and while i didn't feel great for the last four hours, i certainly felt better than i did at hour 5. is this because i usually end a ride before 5 hours (before i was training, that is), a natural response made by my body, nutrition, something else? Just curious if anybody else has noticed certain times in their rides when they feel weak, then feel better later
 

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..probably out riding..
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I think it's kind of a natural response sort of thing. I usually ride about 1.5-2 hours daily. When I do a 4, 8 or 12 hour ride, I don't have problems with it but there is a little barrier around that 2 hour mark... feels like quiting time, then it kicks in that I'm still riding and I have more energy and don't really notice how long the rest of the ride is. But proper nutrition and keeping the right water/chemical/energy balance and maintaining this at all times during the ride certainly makes a big difference in my performance for endurance rides. I've pretty much felt like crap at all points during a ride at one time or another though. If I do everything right with the whole water/chemistry/energy thing I usually feel better after a ride than before, for a ride up to about 6 hours anyways... this can be a real complication here in the desert because summer temps are often 110F and maintaining the right chemical balance/water level is very difficult, more like a loosing battle, after about 4 hours. This persists to about 8 hours with increased dehydration and loss of energy. 8-12 hours is like a red zone causing heat exhaustion (chills, fever, shaking, disorientation, dizziness, rapid shallow breating and pulse rate) and above 12 is like a suicide mission.
 

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Topeak-Ergon Racing
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For me it's usually a physical response to a lack of calories &/or elctrolytes. I was able to go all out for about 10 hours in a race before I'd smack the wall. I was been working on it by:
A. Eating more. Highly processed foods (oatmeal creme pies - OCPs, mmmmm). It is an easy way to get calories fast plus they taste good and require little chewing so you will be more likely to eat them. This does not mean that you should stop eating your normal foods, but try adding a couple of OCPs to the mix.
B. Get more elctrolytes. You have a very finite amount you can store and will run out. Put more in.
C. Control your pace. The difference between a few minutes per lap can be the difference between a hundred calories per lap. Add that up over many laps and you blow up. If you back off a little bit early on, you may be able to make up the difference with a strong finish.

On a side note my cousin, also an endurance racer, experiences a "low point" about 5 or 6 hours in as well. His back will hurt and over all energy will drop, but he rides through it knowing he will rebound after about 30-40 minutes. Then he is back to his usual ways.



Eddie O
 

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The Riddler
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Eddie O said:
For me it's usually a physical response to a lack of calories &/or elctrolytes. I was able to go all out for about 10 hours in a race before I'd smack the wall. I was been working on it by:
A. Eating more. Highly processed foods (oatmeal creme pies - OCPs, mmmmm). It is an easy way to get calories fast plus they taste good and require little chewing so you will be more likely to eat them. This does not mean that you should stop eating your normal foods, but try adding a couple of OCPs to the mix.
B. Get more elctrolytes. You have a very finite amount you can store and will run out. Put more in.
C. Control your pace. The difference between a few minutes per lap can be the difference between a hundred calories per lap. Add that up over many laps and you blow up. If you back off a little bit early on, you may be able to make up the difference with a strong finish.

On a side note my cousin, also an endurance racer, experiences a "low point" about 5 or 6 hours in as well. His back will hurt and over all energy will drop, but he rides through it knowing he will rebound after about 30-40 minutes. Then he is back to his usual ways.

Eddie O
Yeah, I'm not sure what causes it, but just enduring it mentally will get you through it. It happens at around 6.25 hrs for me. After that, I just keep cruising. It helps to know when it happens for you and know that there is a light on the other end of the tunnel.
 

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Eddie O said:
For me it's usually a physical response to a lack of calories &/or elctrolytes. I was able to go all out for about 10 hours in a race before I'd smack the wall. I was been working on it by:
A. Eating more. Highly processed foods (oatmeal creme pies - OCPs, mmmmm). It is an easy way to get calories fast plus they taste good and require little chewing so you will be more likely to eat them. This does not mean that you should stop eating your normal foods, but try adding a couple of OCPs to the mix.
Eddie O
So I was at the store today shopping for my long rides this weekend. Came across the OCP's and remembered this post. I also bought snack-size packs of animal cookies (not animal crackers), and pringles. It's funny, I never would eat this stuff on any other day, but sounds like good fuel on the bike.
 

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Topeak-Ergon Racing
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porterjack said:
So I was at the store today shopping for my long rides this weekend. Came across the OCP's and remembered this post. I also bought snack-size packs of animal cookies (not animal crackers), and pringles. It's funny, I never would eat this stuff on any other day, but sounds like good fuel on the bike.
Pringles would be a great source of salt and carbs. Don't forget the elctrolytes.

Eddie O
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thanks

thanks for the advice, everybody. everything went allright, I don't even remember 5 hours, although the energy levels sure did change from lap to lap. The Oatmeal Creme Pie was one of few things that sounded appealing in the wee hours of the race. For the record, I got 17 laps in, 230ish miles at Hartman's in Gunnison. Now if only my Achilles' tendon would chill out....
 
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