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Over 50, & not '2' tired
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537 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Youtube had muted all the audio to this video, which is from Jan. 2008. It also had some funny people comments toward the end, but those were muted too, along with the music.

Anyway, I just got around to re-uploading it with the restored comments, and new music. This was--and still is--a high water mark for me, skill-wise. I have yet to top my 8-stair unicycle jump! (Mostly out of fear, haha!) Of course, i was only 52 years old then, haha!

It was a proud moment for me, and fyi, I am always up OFF the saddle when doing drops, with all my weight on the pedals. :thumbsup: :D

 

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No, that's not phonetic
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14,313 Posts
Sure, but like with a bike you need to absorb the drop with your legs, especially if you lack suspension. With a lowered saddle you can have a few inches to play with and let your legs cushion the landing. Do you lower your saddle for drops and raise it for XC?
 

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Over 50, & not '2' tired
Joined
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537 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
tscheezy said:
Sure, but like with a bike you need to absorb the drop with your legs, especially if you lack suspension. With a lowered saddle you can have a few inches to play with and let your legs cushion the landing. Do you lower your saddle for drops and raise it for XC?
I shou
ld have also mentioned that the hogh volume 3" wide tire acts a lot like a shock absorber! It compresses for jumping, hopping and tractors over rough terrain. It really takes a great % of impact. But you have to get the psi just right so you don't bottom out on the rim, or have to much air then you don;t have enough compression. But yes, I usually have the saddle lower for drops and technical riding, and higher for climbing and xc-ish riding.
 
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