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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all
I’ve converted my 3x9 (22/32/44t, 11-34) XT to a 2x9 by replacing the middle ring with 38t, (dyna sys so probably a 10sp chainring and removing the 44t , but having some shifting issues and dropped chains probably also due to a broken tooth.
However after reading here it seems the 38t was not the right option anyway and the best setup would be a slx 665 36t, would that be correct, which is intended for a 2x9?

-I’ve adjusted the shifter so they don’t shift past the middle chainring

Also
Will the xt fd will work ok or should I definitely change to the slx fd 665 to shift from 22t to 36t

whats the difference between the fd 665 and 670, I know the 660 is a triple so of no benefit

And why do some of you use a bash guard in lieu of the outer ring, seems to me the 2x only is a cleaner setup

thanks
 

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If what you have done works - don't bother chainging stuff any further. Your FD should handle it fine. Bash rings have three purposes. They protect the chainring from being hit, they serve as a simple, but very effective, chain device and protect your leg from being bit by the chainring in a crash.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hi
It doesn’t work, hence reaching out
And I’m trying to find the best solution

thanks for the bash guard info, interesting.
What type of rider uses a bashguard

(Sounds like it’s not like the XC crowd , as we are not concerned about the above 3 reasons)

So will a 22/36t shift well with a XT760 front derailleur design for a 22/32/44 or so I need a fd that handles a 22/36 ( or more specifically a 14t jump )

thanks
 

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Its not the jump that is the problem - its the timing. Chainrings that are meant to cooperate with each other need to be positioned specifically for that purpose, to allow the chain to move to/from the big ring through a series of indentations and ramps. You can see it here:


If that does not happen, then shifting becomes compromised - to a varying degree. In the most pathological case going from the small to the big ring will either not shift at one position and then will shift over the big ring to the outside - dropping the chain. This is where a lightweight bashguard helps, because it is a natural barrier for the chain, forcing it to the big ring. In all honesty - a bashguard weights ` 60-80 grams and for what it does it is really a no-brainer for me.

Other then that - you need a set of rings that were meant to work in tandem - their 'speedness' does not really matter, but them being matched to each other is important.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Its not the jump that is the problem - its the timing. Chainrings that are meant to cooperate with each other need to be positioned specifically for that purpose, to allow the chain to move to/from the big ring through a series of indentations and ramps. You can see it here:


If that does not happen, then shifting becomes compromised - to a varying degree. In the most pathological case going from the small to the big ring will either not shift at one position and then will shift over the big ring to the outside - dropping the chain. This is where a lightweight bashguard helps, because it is a natural barrier for the chain, forcing it to the big ring. In all honesty - a bashguard weights ` 60-80 grams and for what it does it is really a no-brainer for me.

Other then that - you need a set of rings that were meant to work in tandem - their 'speedness' does not really matter, but them being matched to each other is important.



Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #7
So the key takeaway here is to use chainings that are designed to work together, so if I want 22t inner ring the the 36t from slx 665 is a combo that should work fine

And similarly if I want to go to 38t then use a 24t inner ring setup that was designed as such
 
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