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Short-Change-Hero
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What is the time frame that you are riding these given miles in? If you are riding that many miles in a fairly short period of time then fatigue may happen quicker. Also, could be your particular riding style vs. the frame/brand. If you ride a bike that is meant more for XC like a DH/AM bike then of course it is going to break. So are you riding as the designer intended the bike to be ridden (or in this case the frame)?
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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40,990 Posts
What is the time frame that you are riding these given miles in? If you are riding that many miles in a fairly short period of time then fatigue may happen quicker. Also, could be your particular riding style vs. the frame/brand. If you ride a bike that is meant more for XC like a DH/AM bike then of course it is going to break. So are you riding as the designer intended the bike to be ridden (or in this case the frame)?
Fatigue doesn't happen on Ti frames. Exceeding the stress/elastic limit will cause a Ti frame to fail just like an aluminum one. It's either failing because of understress failure, which means it was being used within the design criteria and had a flaw for whatever reason(not always manufacturer) or over stress, being used past it's intended design criteria.
 

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Short-Change-Hero
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6,543 Posts
Fatigue doesn't happen on Ti frames. Exceeding the stress/elastic limit will cause a Ti frame to fail just like an aluminum one. It's either failing because of understress failure, which means it was being used within the design criteria and had a flaw for whatever reason(not always manufacturer) or over stress, being used past it's intended design criteria.
Ok I wasn't sure if Ti fatigued differently than aluminum would or how drastically. I was wondering too that if significant mileage was put on in a very short period of time (have family friends that are racers and will do 100+ mile rides every other weekend with shorter rides almost everyday in-between) if that would influence the fatigue statistics. Sounds like it may have been a bad batch of Ti tubing? As Ti is not cheap I am sure Lynskey would want to make it right but I would probably go with a different company (Moots maybe) and sell of the replacement frame.
 

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mmcclusk2 cracking where on the frame? Welds or tubes? And are they addressing by adding gussets or using straight gauge ti tubing instead of lightweight butted. Heat treated?
I'm going to guess around the headtube or chainstay. Probably headtube. I know someone else who is on their 3rd frame. I sold mine (it was a road bike) after the repair of the first crack (tube split about 2 inches up the chainstay on mine).
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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40,990 Posts
Ok I wasn't sure if Ti fatigued differently than aluminum would or how drastically. I was wondering too that if significant mileage was put on in a very short period of time (have family friends that are racers and will do 100+ mile rides every other weekend with shorter rides almost everyday in-between) if that would influence the fatigue statistics. Sounds like it may have been a bad batch of Ti tubing? As Ti is not cheap I am sure Lynskey would want to make it right but I would probably go with a different company (Moots maybe) and sell of the replacement frame.
Yep, no effect, because titanium doesn't fatigue. Whether this is an advantage is really not clear, as many aluminum frames last a long time and at least on paper, it's unlikely anyone will ever put as many "cycles" on them as required for a fatigue failure. Most failures are due to overstress, a design imperfection, or corrosion/damage, actual fatigue would be one of the rarest IMO, usually it's premature failure of a section or part, and Titanium is just as susceptible as anything else in this case.
 

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Trail Ninja
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6,690 Posts
Can only suspect contaminated welds (example), weakness in the heat affected zones, etc. without pics. Low grade tubing from less reputable suppliers is also something that can be suspected. Don't expect Steve Potts level workmanship from Lynskey. I've seen custom builders criticize high production Ti fabs when they see pics (ex. factory tour) of the heat-related damage to tubes (ex. oxidization), saying that the damage reduces the life of the bike, and I caught a reply to the criticism implying that the bike will be disposed of well before that happens and that their generous warranty will cover it in case it does fail. I've questioned the "Ti is forever" saying ever since... well, maybe with exceptions like Eriksen and Potts. I know I'm not surprised to hear of your issues, as cutting corners with the welding process leads to such bummer stories. They're trying to weld up many bikes quickly, with nice-looking weld beads, and I bet a bit of oxidization is acceptable to them considering the process they use to achieve their production quota. They can just easily remove the evidence in the frame finishing stage, but it doesn't remove the problem. Contamination = very bad.
 

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I had a cracked chain stay on my road bike, took forever for them to fix and terrible communication. Then I had some creaking coming from the seat tube and realized the aluminum insert was too small. They didn't want to believe me or the shop owner (a long time and successful litespeed dealer). They tried to blame it on the thomson post being under sized. Sh!t happens, but it's how you handle your sh!t that counts. If I have any other issues, I am getting rid of the bike. Just hoping it will hold up a couple of years so I can save for something else.
 
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