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schwalbetires considering 32c
Your are going to have to do better than that.

Need more info.
  • Which model? Be specific, Schwalbe has about 40 models of streetroad/touring tires.
  • What do you have now? Be specific.
  • What are your roads like?
  • What do you use the bike for?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
ok my tires lifted info off the tire is:

Schwalbe RoadCruiser HS 337

37-622
28x1.40
700x35c



700 x 35C
Puncture Protection Reflex SBC 35-65 625 g 50 90 kg 17 $29.35




what is weird that on gt site the bike the gt traffic has 700x40c and is not right
 

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I need your input on the downgrade. Smoother acceleration? Faster speed? Better over all in town?
If you don't like this tire at 35c, I don't think you are going to like it much better getting the same model in a smaller size. In general, the main difference going smaller with an otherwise identical tire is that you can run a higher pressure if you want to, though in my opinion most people are running too much pressure to start with. In my expereince, if you are riding on rough roads (potholes, cracked pavement, gravel, etc) larger tires are better because you can run the pressure lower.

If the tire you have feels slow, that is either due to rolling resistance or weight. The smaller size will be a little lighter, but it likely will not roll faster if it has the same type of casing.

You should be specific about what it is you want from a new tire. Just speed? You can probably get that going to a different tire of the same size as what you have. Do you need much puncture protection? That tends to add to the rolling resistance due to the thicker casing.

I'm running a set of 33.3c tires (Jack Browns) that are very light, very fast rolling, and very supple on the road. Freaking dream to ride over cracked roads and on gravel. Very little puncture protection, though, but that is not too big a deal where I live. It is fine for rough roads and gravel, it is stuff like metal and glass debris that they do not do well with. When I take the bike to someplace like New York City, I switch to thicker, slower tires. Same size, but slower due to the construction.

Getting tires with a folding bead will save you a bit of weight without going smaller on the volume.

In short, spending the money and time to get the RIGHT tire is going to give you much better results than just getting a smaller version of what you already have.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
If you don't like this tire at 35c, I don't think you are going to like it much better getting the same model in a smaller size. In general, the main difference going smaller with an otherwise identical tire is that you can run a higher pressure if you want to, though in my opinion most people are running too much pressure to start with. In my expereince, if you are riding on rough roads (potholes, cracked pavement, gravel, etc) larger tires are better because you can run the pressure lower.

If the tire you have feels slow, that is either due to rolling resistance or weight. The smaller size will be a little lighter, but it likely will not roll faster if it has the same type of casing.

You should be specific about what it is you want from a new tire. Just speed? You can probably get that going to a different tire of the same size as what you have. Do you need much puncture protection? That tends to add to the rolling resistance due to the thicker casing.
I'm running a set of 33.3c tires (Jack Browns) that are very light, very fast rolling, and very supple on the road. Freaking dream to ride over cracked roads and on gravel. Very little puncture protection, though, but that is not too big a deal where I live. It is fine for rough roads and gravel, it is stuff like metal and glass debris that they do not do well with. When I take the bike to someplace like New York City, I switch to thicker, slower tires. Same size, but slower due to the construction.

Getting tires with a folding bead will save you a bit of weight without going smaller on the volume.

In short, spending the money and time to get the RIGHT tire is going to give you much better results than just getting a smaller version of what you already have.
I do want smaller tires for less weight, and better rolling resistance and very good for tire puncture protections. Are armadillos any good? Should I stick schwalbe?
 
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