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Depends on what kind of mud you ride in most often.

Sticky: Small tires that slice through and do not fill themselves up.
Slimey with a hard layer underneath or wet forest soil that does not stick: Might as well keep it bigger. If there is lots of rocks/roots in there, definitely keep it bigger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Typically very sticky 3" thick layer of mud. No rocks but some roots here and there. 2.2" tires add some welcome comfort to my fully rigid, but tire preformance overrules.

So what would YOU do?
 

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Typically very sticky 3" thick layer of mud. No rocks but some roots here and there. 2.2" tires add some welcome comfort to my fully rigid, but tire preformance overrules.

So what would YOU do?
Jeroen has it right.

Depends on what kind of mud you ride in most often.

Sticky: Small tires that slice through and do not fill themselves up.
Slimey with a hard layer underneath or wet forest soil that does not stick: Might as well keep it bigger. If there is lots of rocks/roots in there, definitely keep it bigger.
"Some roots here and there" does not sound like many roots, so I would choose performance over comfort, especially if racing. Your mud: are you talking about the occasional patch of mud, or more of a constant mud-fest?
 

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I'm running a Nevegal in the front on a Rhythm Comp (wide) front wheel and a Bontrager Mud-X TLR 2.0 in the rear on a Race Lite (narrow) wheel. The tread pattern in the 2 tires is actually very similar, but their widths are massively different, the Nevegal opens up quite a bit on a wide rim, the Mud-X looks pretty small for a 2.0. In the New England mud we get up here, I tend to find the Nevegal has some float, which I'd expect, but is also a little squirrley in the mud. The Mud-X doesn't float, but the tall knobs SEEM to give me better stability in the rear and more consistent traction getting out of the slop. In my mind, this is a good setup for getting through prolonged mud holes; but I still think it's a relatively small factor compared to managing your weight between the contact patches and feeding power to the rear tire with measure and care.
 

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Typically very sticky 3" thick layer of mud. No rocks but some roots here and there. 2.2" tires add some welcome comfort to my fully rigid, but tire preformance overrules.

So what would YOU do?
I would use the Bonty Mud X TLR 2.0, though "sticky" may need a narrower tire. Hard to find a good tread for a narrower mudder.

I also like the look of the Maxxis Beaver but have yet to use one.
 

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Should the same thoughts be used for 6" and less of snow and all around winter wet months? What if you throw rocks in the mix?

Reason I ask is im having a hell of a time picking a 29er tire for this winter. 26er has much more choices and seems to be easier. Unless you want to make wet screams in 29er.
Pretty much. I liked 35-42mm tires for snow.
 

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I've had great results with the Michelin AT2.0 here in Norcal mud. 2.0" width with a open tread pattern that the mud just doesn't seem to stick to - never tried it on the front but great on the rear wheel...
 

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Maxxis Beaver? a unique and very light mud/wet conditions tire. i just got one in today, but have yet to ride. though when i do, it will most definitely will be wet, it's raining like hell here on Vancouver Island, in the rainforest, what else is new....
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well I can't predict how it's going to be this winter, but usually it's a mudfest.
I haven't tried the new beawer either... I'm running the Ikons now and for me it hasn't been a great experience.
 
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