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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 29er motobecane hard tail sitting in my basement not being ridden so I'm thinking about getting a ridged for and some slick tires to take it on paved paths with my kids or just to run errands around town. I ha e no clue what I'm doing and I want to do it as cheap as possible. Is there a cheap ridged fork that anyone can recommend and what slick tires will fit on my rims Weinmann Metal Products Co., LTD. Thanks in advance.
 

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Just leave the fork on it for now, lock out or more air if you think it's needed. And what ever slicks will fit.
 

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Straight with disk. I have a 100mm suntour xtc on it now.
measure the axle to crown height a find a rigid fork similar. Often times you can find take off rigid forks at bike shops from bikes that people upgrade. Or you can pick up surly rigid forks from any number of online sources.

match the a-c measurement with a rigid: Forks | Origin8

expect to pay around $125 new.
 

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For commuting, this one would be OK. It's a shorter AC length, which will increase your headtube angle, make handling quicker, and make the handlebar feel lower, but it's cheap and it works. If you want a good long AC length on a fork to keep the handlebar up, Surley Krampus and Salsa Firestarter are good long steel forks.
Nashbar Chromoly 29" Mountain Fork

For the tires, what motobecane do you have? You could probably just air them up to about 50 psi and ride them as is.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I have the 2015 motobecane fantom x4

All stock I bought a new bike 3 months after I got it so it doesnt have many miles on it.

 

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measure the axle to crown height a find a rigid fork similar. Often times you can find take off rigid forks at bike shops from bikes that people upgrade. Or you can pick up surly rigid forks from any number of online sources.

match the a-c measurement with a rigid: Forks | Origin8

expect to pay around $125 new.
The Origin8 Scout fork should work fine, though it may be on the short side, but if anyone tries to charge you more then 80 bucks for it they are ripping you off. Surly Krampus fork would work too, and will be lighter and have more mounts, should be $110 or less.

Any tire from 700x40 to 29x2.3" should work fine on that bike/wheels.
 

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The moto's stock WTB nano tires are actually pretty good for road use. Air them up to 50 psi, and they'll roll like crazy. Still heavy on the climbs, because they're wire bead mountain tires, but they're much better than most for road use.
 

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salsa makes some good rigid forks. the cromoto grande. i have the fargo, not sure if they still make it. they are solid, light, and do a good job soaking up the bumps for a rigid.
 

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I did the same to my 26" hardtail, then sold it, and put the same fork on my 29" but have it setup for all-around riding.

Get the Nashbar fork above. It says for 26" but the A-C is only about 20mm less than what a 29er would be. And for riding around town, etc, it will be just fine. With their never-ending sales/coupons you can get it for less than $50. It will even hold a 29x2.5 if you wish to ever ride it off road.

As far as tires go, pickup something in the 700x35-40 range. WTB Nano or something similar. The extra width wont hurt your speed but the bit of tread will help if you end up on a bike path, water, mud, etc.

All in all you can be out of there for about $100 or so depending on what tires you choose.
 

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I'm not a fan of slick tires... just run knobbies myself.

Friends of mine that do run them have had some nasty wheel washouts when it rains.
 

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I'm not a fan of slick tires... just run knobbies myself.

Friends of mine that do run them have had some nasty wheel washouts when it rains.
slick tires actually have better grip on asphalt than knobbies.
much better. I prefer schwalbe or continental myself. their best ****.
and in the winter nokians.
 

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slick tires actually have better grip on asphalt than knobbies.
much better. I prefer schwalbe or continental myself. their best ****.
and in the winter nokians.
I have had this argument with enough people I'd be interested to see some actual data. Some people insist a knobby will corner better on asphalt, some argue full slicks, I think with the minor irregularities inherent of the surface that it has to be something in the middle.
 

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I converted my full rigid Specialized Carve SL SS to an all purpose machine. I have had an absolute blast on this. Upgraded wheels/hubs and then thew on some Continental City Ride II tires and air them up to 60psi. In the winter the Nokian studded tires go back on.
 

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The thing is by arguing against the fact that on clear pavement slicks have the most traction means your telling every engineer in the field for the last century that their wrong.

Hell this was covered in grade school science class. The section on physics.

What is traction in this case? Traction is a result of the friction created between the tire and the surface that it's in contact with.

Pavement is a specifically designed and constructed surface. Among the long list of its design requirements, it's meant to increase friction. To create greater traction for more stability and control. Being that it's a relatively smooth surface that's solid (unlike dirt). So traction comes down to a few simple points:

Type of rubber compound in the tires. The softer the rubber, the higher the friction. Much like dirt tires. "Stickier" tires means better grip.

Contact patch of the tire. More contact with the surface the more friction. Dirt is something completely different in this aspect as even hard packed dirt has MUCH lower friction than pavement. Pavement is designed to increase friction, basically making the road itself "sticky" in a sense.

When you add knobs, you break up that contact patch and create irregularities in the surface contacting the road. Which means you decrease true contact patch with the road, decreasing friction, thus decreasing traction.

On dry pavement the only improvements to be made are rubber compound and tire width (which increases contact patch).

Sorry but it's the most basic physics laws there is. And just go try to convince a guy with a "crotch rocket" (motorcycle) to put knobbies on his bike cause it's better traction. Walk into a motorcycle shop, a NASCAR pit area, any of that and try your reasoning with them and see where it gets you.

There is no argument to be made, though so many guys here think the laws of physics don't apply to bicycles (guys like you), i regret to inform you the human race is no where near able to defy any of them.

Now you add in all the other factors, weather, if you ride in anything besides pavement then that changes completely. And that's where decision on tread pattern come in. And a 2.3 mountain bike tire is going to have a lot more traction than a 25c road tire. Not because of the tread, but because of the massive increase in width and thus contact patch.

Sent from my XT1565 using Tapatalk
 

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And on slightly irregular pavement, soft compound and running a lower pressure will increase grip even more than they do on very smooth pavement, as it will let the slick tread conform to the shape of the pavement better, giving more contact patch and more grip. Even on rough or cracked pavement, knobbies don't help, as there's nothing to dig into, so you still end up with little points of contact instead of the bigger contact patch of a slick.
 

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The thing is by arguing against the fact that on clear pavement slicks have the most traction means your telling every engineer in the field for the last century that their wrong.

Hell this was covered in grade school science class. The section on physics.

What is traction in this case? Traction is a result of the friction created between the tire and the surface that it's in contact with.

Pavement is a specifically designed and constructed surface. Among the long list of its design requirements, it's meant to increase friction. To create greater traction for more stability and control. Being that it's a relatively smooth surface that's solid (unlike dirt). So traction comes down to a few simple points:

Type of rubber compound in the tires. The softer the rubber, the higher the friction. Much like dirt tires. "Stickier" tires means better grip.

Contact patch of the tire. More contact with the surface the more friction. Dirt is something completely different in this aspect as even hard packed dirt has MUCH lower friction than pavement. Pavement is designed to increase friction, basically making the road itself "sticky" in a sense.

When you add knobs, you break up that contact patch and create irregularities in the surface contacting the road. Which means you decrease true contact patch with the road, decreasing friction, thus decreasing traction.

On dry pavement the only improvements to be made are rubber compound and tire width (which increases contact patch).

Sorry but it's the most basic physics laws there is. And just go try to convince a guy with a "crotch rocket" (motorcycle) to put knobbies on his bike cause it's better traction. Walk into a motorcycle shop, a NASCAR pit area, any of that and try your reasoning with them and see where it gets you.

There is no argument to be made, though so many guys here think the laws of physics don't apply to bicycles (guys like you), i regret to inform you the human race is no where near able to defy any of them.

Now you add in all the other factors, weather, if you ride in anything besides pavement then that changes completely. And that's where decision on tread pattern come in. And a 2.3 mountain bike tire is going to have a lot more traction than a 25c road tire. Not because of the tread, but because of the massive increase in width and thus contact patch.

Sent from my XT1565 using Tapatalk
To farther this discussion you may find it helpful to inform us who this rant was directed at.
 
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