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Carbon8er
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I ordered some of these boards to test.
https://www.kaidomain.com/ProductDetails.aspx?ProductId=10995

Edit: Updated image for 105C boards from Kaidoman
(Previous image was not correct)
Larger image link
https://www.el34world.com/Misc/bike/images/IMG_6596.png



Looks like it will save me a bunch of labor, instead of having to create 2800ma drivers from two 1400ma boards. Have to wait and see if they work out or not.

I am curious if anyone else has more info on the operation of these boards???

How do you cycle through the modes???

I am hoping that you use a NC (Normally closed) momentary switch and disconnect/reconnect ground to the star that you are currently using?

Or do you interrupt the power from the battery to the whole board assembly?

BTW, the Artic alumina thermal adhesive may work out really nice for installing heat sink slugs in the Marwi Bullet housings.
It set up really hard in a short amount of time.
I took a dremel wire wheel and removed all the red annodizing in order to get down to bare aluminum. It was fast and easy to get down to the bare metal. The adhesive is against two bare aluminum surfaces.
 

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The boards aren't too bad at all. The modes are (unfortunately for you) switched by interrupting the power to the whole board. The design of the board is for one of the stars to be (permanently) connected to ground, and which star is connected determines the modes which the board will cycle through when the power is interrupted. After all, it is designed to operate in a flashlight and to be set up and left.

It is designed to use a latching switch (on / off), but a normally closed would also work if you don't mind disconnecting the battery to turn it off (off isn't one of the modes the board cycles through!). Normally the full power of the LED does flow through the switch, but there is a way of wiring it such that it doesn't. The positive LED lead from the driver is connected to V+, so you can connect the LED to V+ from the battery rather than on the board. Then put the switch in the positive supply lead to the driver and it will only be switching the power for the driver circuitry, not the LEDs as well. Let me know if you need a circuit diagram for that.

Michael

Sent from my GT-I9100 using Tapatalk
 

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Been building with those boards over the past 6 months. No problems at all.

I always set them to high/low (star number 4 ) and use the latching switch from mouser. I just flutter the power button to switch modes.

The low is just in case of break down while on the trail.
 

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El34,

That driver looks eerily similar to the one I bought from Illumination Supply but a couple dollars more (+shipping) and I received mine in a few days.

8xAMC7135 (2.8A) (selectable) Mode Driver - $6.75 : Illumination Supply, Dedicated to bringing you products of superior Quality and Reliability

I had them jumper mine for the low/med/high mode (see pic below). You've raised a good question about the mode selection. I will have to re-read the posts but I could have sworn that someone did a "half tap" on the switch and it changed modes. Are you saying that the original Marwi switch (in the new style Marwi) will not accept the higher amps from the 18650 2400mah cells the way they are wired? :eek:

 

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It is the same, and you can also buy it from shiningbeam in the US. You can change modes by half-tapping the common type of latching switch. It is a flashlight driver and is designed to change modes upon temporary interruption to the power supply. Flashlights have a latching switch that toggles between open and closed upon a full press, just like a ball-point pen. When the switch is closed the light is on, when it is open the light is off as all power is cut. However most flashlights use what is known as a "reverse-clicky" switch, meaning it latches to the next state only when the switch is released after being fully depressed. If you only partially depress the switch it will only temporarily break the circuit, not latching into the open, or off, state. So with a reverse clicky switch you tap the switch to change modes, press fully and release to turn on / off
 

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I used those boards from kaidomain. With my cheap and big iron it's very difficult to solder the (-)-thread from the LED to the board. Shiningbeam sells them with the threads already on I think.
The clicky switches from dealextreme break very quickly, probably because of the high current. Perhaps this big ones are better?

If someone is interested: this board is not capable to light three XR-E wired parallel from a single 18650 cell. :nono:
But with two of those boards you can drive two XM-L's from a single 18650. :D Not that I would ever try such a silly thing ....

Still haven't managed to build a very light helemet torchlight with enough throw.:mad: Has anybody ever tried to direct drive a XM-L from a 18650 LiFePO4?
 

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Carbon8er
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The boards aren't too bad at all. The modes are (unfortunately for you) switched by interrupting the power to the whole board. The design of the board is for one of the stars to be (permanently) connected to ground, and which star is connected determines the modes which the board will cycle through when the power is interrupted. After all, it is designed to operate in a flashlight and to be set up and left.

It is designed to use a latching switch (on / off), but a normally closed would also work if you don't mind disconnecting the battery to turn it off (off isn't one of the modes the board cycles through!). Normally the full power of the LED does flow through the switch, but there is a way of wiring it such that it doesn't. The positive LED lead from the driver is connected to V+, so you can connect the LED to V+ from the battery rather than on the board. Then put the switch in the positive supply lead to the driver and it will only be switching the power for the driver circuitry, not the LEDs as well. Let me know if you need a circuit diagram for that.
mfj197 that pretty much answers everything I needed to know.
I think I can still make it work just like it does in a flashlight.

Woke up this morning and realized that the Judco switches that fit the Marwi Bullet housings are rated 2 amp at 14 volts.
In theory they should be good to go for a higher amperage at a lower voltage. I am using parallel battery packs, so the voltage is only 3.7 to 4.2 volts.
They were used in the original 6 volt Halogen Marwi's and I have never seen one melt down.

The switches look like this


OD, thanks for the info. Yeah, I am only interested in low-high myself
 

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Well, switch current rating isn't really voltage dependent so you can't trade volts for amps. Having said that, you'd be asking a 2A switch to operate at 150% of its design capacity - it would probably work fine, just in the same way as you can drive an XP-E at 1.5A although it's only rated for 1A. The only way is to suck it and see, and make sure the switch is accessible!

I forgot to mention earlier, I have two of these boards. One is great, and the other one starts to flicker a bit when the battery voltage is low. I haven't looked into why! The other thing is they are very sensitive to voltage interruptions and will change mode very readily - the merest bump on the battery pack can cause it to change mode if the batteries aren't well connected.
 

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The other thing is they are very sensitive to voltage interruptions and will change mode very readily - the merest bump on the battery pack can cause it to change mode if the batteries aren't well connected.
So worse case scenario is maybe to somehow jumper it in the high mode if it is too sensitive and constantly switches modes? That would suck on a fast downhill to have it switch from high to low :eek:
 

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Carbon8er
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well, switch current rating isn't really voltage dependent so you can't trade volts for amps
Sure you can. Many switches have multiple ratings at different voltages
example: 3 amps at 250v or 6amps at 125vac

Of course voltage is pressure and at 3.7volts there isn't much pressure.

the merest bump on the battery pack can cause it to change mode if the batteries aren't well connected
Just one more reason why I only use and build only soldered battery packs.
 

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Interesting...I just soldered up and installed my first one of these.

I did jumper the star in position # 3 to ground, but I did NOT cut the trace from position # 1 to ground....I am however getting a low (very low) medium and high setting.
 

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Carbon8er
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I did jumper the star in position # 3 to ground, but I did NOT cut the trace from position # 1 to ground....I am however getting a low (very low) medium and high setting
hmm, I got that drawing off the Candle power forum. Don't really know if it is accurate, but it sounds like the correct thing to do.

Just got off the phone with Judco switches.
I asked about me wanting to run 2.8 amps through the switch.
They said that the best thing to do would be to runs some real world test.
So, I am going to throw together a Marwi housing with a P7 and let the current limit boards cap the current at 2.8 amps. Run it on the bench for a few hours and then open up the switch to see how it did.

Off to do some test
 

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Just got off the phone with Judco switches.
I asked about me wanting to run 2.8 amps through the switch.
They said that the best thing to do would be to runs some real world test.
So, I am going to throw together a Marwi housing with a P7 and let the current limit boards cap the current at 2.8 amps. Run it on the bench for a few hours and then open up the switch to see how it did.

Off to do some test
The switch will need to be cycled under load to really see how it copes. The make and break of the circuit is what is hard on the contacts.
 

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Carbon8er
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I opened up one of the Judco switches and had a look at the construction.
The contacts look better than clicky switches I have taken apart.
They look beefy enough to me, but I will be putting them through some clicking test under load.

The Judco engineer says that they test them for about 4 hours under heavy load to see if heat is a factor.
The plastic could get soft if it is too much for the switch

I actually had this happen on some cheap clicky switches I got a long time ago.
DX substituted another switch for one that was known to work just fine

All of a sudden my lights were melting switches
Had to ***** at DX and get the original clickies shipped to me
Problem fixed, so there is a difference in switch body plastics.
 

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If the original Marwi switches can't take it, couldn't we rig them with some remote switches instead? Leave the "dummy" switches in the plastic light bodies and tie in a remote switch that could be mounted (or zip tied) within reach of your hand?

What about a heavier duty switch with the same size and configuration that will take the load???
 

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yes, I can do it with the Marwi remote switches I already have but then that means it's a bar mount only light.

Trying to put a remote switch on a helmet light won't cut it.

I am trying to make one light bar or helmet mount.
Let's hope the original switches hold up!

I would not be opposed to going with a remote switch on a short lead using these on your website if we needed to:

 
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