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Maybe they didn't expect people to crash.

:D

j/k. I think it's pretty silly as well. I put a riser bar on and added some protective tape to the top tube.
Yes, but you shouldn't be forced to put a riser bar on or to protect the top tube. As you've heard, it doesn't take a crash to damage the top tube - you can lean your bike against your car, have it fall over and the damage is there.
 

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Orange Bikes USA Dealer
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I finally got in a shake down ride on my Comp.
Was stock other than SQLabs 30x bars (12 degree sweep, 45 rise), Oury slip ons, 15mm spacers under stem, and tires converted to tubeless.

I'm 160ish, 5'7.5", about 32 inseam, coming from an 18 Top Fuel.
Southeast Michigan area.

The bike rides well overall. Of course it felt very different, but generally in a good way.
I'm going to reserve judgement until I have it dialed in to my liking.
I'll try to elaborate on fit and overall performance/handling after more time on the bike.

One immediate concern was that the suspension was harsher than expected. I know it isn't a 160mm bomber, but it should be smoother.
Suspension was set close to the recommendation of the online calculator: fork around 72, rebound 11 click out. Shock 175ish, rebound 5 clicks out.

The fork was pretty good overall. Sagged around 20%, used a decent amount of travel, but not all. Seemed more progressive than expected, and not very sensitive to the small stuff.
I hope that the fork has a token that can be removed, or that it just needs to break in.

The rear was sagged to ~30%, and was quite a bit harsher; more than the Trek. This surprised me, because the Trek isn't known to have a smooth rear.
I forgot to take a look to see how much travel was used.

The harshness is concerning. People often talked about the smoothness of Horst bikes (I know, it depends on the kinematic design, expectations, cycles of the moon, etc) wondered if the loss of of the Horst is detrimental.
I'm skeptical that flexing stays will provide the same effect...but time will tell.

The shock seems to be very progressive, maybe with aggressive low-speed compression damping, because it is hesitant to move on smaller stuff.
I could drop off Mt. Everest and not bottom it.
I really hope there is a token or 2 in it (or it seriously needs to be broken in, or my setup is completely wrong), otherwise I'll need to get another shock...or bike.

The bike, per reviews and on paper, seems to be exactly what Ive been looking for: a little more travel, quality travel, lightweight, XC leaning toward trail.
I have a lot of good to say about the bike, but prefer to air out the concerns first.

My plan is to check the fork for tokens, carefully tune it, and give it some break in time.
I might tear it down to make sure there aren't globs of grease, and that it has proper lube, etc.

If I determine the fork has too much inherent compression damping, is the Charger Race Day a good option?
The damper makes me nervous...looks like a toy.

I will do the same with the shock.

I prefer a more active suspension. I'm fine with some additional damping for control, but I don't need aggressive platforms.

Bob
Bob,
I'm in SE Michigan too. What I found was that the rebound needs to be set almost as fast as it can go - maybe minus 1 or 2 clicks, otherwise the rear packs up and feels harsh - especially over our terrain.

Try setting the rebound faster and go ride it again. It won't be plush, but it won't pack up either and you won't get that harsh feeling. Oh, and I'm at 25% sag too.

One other thing was that I found I needed to then run the front end faster because it was out of balance, but that was an easy fix and I am enjoying the bike. It's not in the same league as my Orange Evo, but it's 4 pounds lighter. HA
 

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OK, but I'm spending time/money to resolve this issue, especially during a time when you most likely couldn't get a replacement frame even if the damage was covered under warranty.
You aren't climbing that mountain alone. Many of us have done the same and aren't happy about having to do that. We can adjust or sell the bike. Wouldn't be a problem to get your money back.
 

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Maybe they didn't expect people to crash.

:D

j/k. I think it's pretty silly as well. I put a riser bar on and added some protective tape to the top tube.
OK, but I'm spending time/money to resolve this issue, especially during a time when you most likely couldn't get a replacement frame even if the damage was covered under warranty.
Yes - and the damage (at least mine) is not covered under warranty. Specialized offered me 35% off a new bike from Specialized.com. The only thing available is a 2020 S-Works Stumpjumper frame - no discount can be applied to S-Works. Actually! One of the only bikes available is the $1,000 carbon Hotwalk balance bike. Maybe I'll buy that for my niece 😅
 

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You aren't climbing that mountain alone. Many of us have done the same and aren't happy about having to do that. We can adjust or sell the bike. Wouldn't be a problem to get your money back.
But I love the bike except for this issue, so selling it is not an option for me.
 

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So he hit a tree and he’s mad his 23lb carbon race bike broke? Sounds like he should invest in learning how to ride...
Seemed to me like his handlebar snagged a tree and went down. Not a huge crash. Specialized used to have a rubber stopper on the downtube of its Epic race bikes to prevent such an issue from happening in a crash. Anyways - I think it shows how the top tube clearance issue should have been thought through better.
 

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Orange Bikes USA Dealer
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I've made a similar post already in this thread:

I don't understand how the handlebar hitting the top tube is a problem unique to this bicycle. Every mountain bike I've owned has this "problem".
Not everyone has owned multiple bikes like you or I have had. This may be someone's first bike, of which they spent a lot of money on.

So maybe this is something shocking to them for which they are concerned.
 

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Yeah, back pain is the worst. I haven't had much in my life, but many of my patients do, and it can be debilitating.
The few times I've had pain (once pulled a muscle draining hamburger meat from a heavy cast iron skillet...yes, totally embarrassing) it was terrible.
Take care of your back--stay active, but listen to your body.

I'll bet that Stumpy will be a super fun ride! Should take the edge of as well.

I rode the Evo again today.
It is stunningly fast, and handles beautifully.
But, it is just a harsh ride, which is the complete opposite of all of the reviews.
I'm not getting any younger, so I can't tolerate wear and tear like a youngster. This could prompt me to get a more cushy ride ( I thought it would have a bit more than my Top Fuel).

I look forward to your review of the Stumpy.

Bob
Have you tried a different shock? I swapped the SidLuxe for the new Manitou Mara inline and made a huge difference, gives it more of a trail bike feel but not as efficient but to me was a trade I was willing to make.
 

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Not everyone has owned multiple bikes like you or I have had. This may be someone's first bike, of which they spent a lot of money on.

So maybe this is something shocking to them for which they are concerned.
But it's a simple function of geometry.

A bike that runs a low riser/flat bar + low/negative rise stem + few/no spacers will have this "problem".

Turns out, bikes that are made for going fast on varied terrain tend to have those attributes. Buying another bike in this genre isn't going to solve it; that's the way it is.
 

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But it's a simple function of geometry.

A bike that runs a low riser/flat bar + low/negative rise stem + few/no spacers will have this "problem".

Turns out, bikes that are made for going fast on varied terrain tend to have those attributes. Buying another bike in this genre isn't going to solve it; that's the way it is.
Don't agree that it has to be this way, even with a low rider/flat bar. If the frame top tube can't be lowered during the design phase, then equip the bike with shifters + dropper remote which don't extend much below the handlebars. Problem solved. There are a number of dropper remotes which do exactly that (see photo). GripShift solves the shifter problem as well.

1929066
1929069
 

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But it's a simple function of geometry.

A bike that runs a low riser/flat bar + low/negative rise stem + few/no spacers will have this "problem".

Turns out, bikes that are made for going fast on varied terrain tend to have those attributes. Buying another bike in this genre isn't going to solve it; that's the way it is.
Yea that's definitely not true. If you look at the down country bikes in Pinkbike's XC field test that accompany the Epic Evo (Revel Ranger, Yeti SB115, Transition Spur, Cannondale Scalpel SE1), the top tubes are lower than tob tube on the Epic Evo and some of those bikes have riser bars. Also, the Evo had the same amount of spacer's as my wife's Stumpjumper. It's really the bar + the top tube that's the issue.

It may be simple to you, but based on the responses in this thread and multiple different LBS employees who were shocked at how easily the top tube on my bike cracked, it's not that obvious. Going forward, I'm always going to be aware of this issue on any future bike I buy, but I never saw it coming. As @Zerort said above, it shouldn't matter how experienced you are, a bike shouldn't have such a weak point that it fails when tipping over onto the ground. Yes, maybe it scratches the paint, but making the bike unrideable is pretty wild. And obviously Specialized knows about this issue because they used to put a rubber stopper on the down tube of their Epic race bikes to prevent damage in a crash from handle bar spin.
 

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Agreed. Specialized could have easily installed those bumpers on this bike. It was either an oversight (doubtful), or they just wanted to have bragging rights they had a super lightweight full sus bike.

For what these bikes cost, I doubt they were trying to cut costs (and pass the savings onto the consumer).

There is no excuse for poor design, or poor planning.
 
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