Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner

1261 - 1280 of 1662 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
741 Posts
@msrothwe I 2nd what the guys above me said. I had bobbing initially but once I got the pressure dialed in it's almost completely gone, and I always keep it wide open. The shock pressure that the Specialized Suspension Calculator says to use was wayyyy off, by about 50 psi in my case. I kept adding pressure and it kept pedaling better. I haven't gone too far with it but I'm close. The fork pressure recommendation was pretty much spot on, within 5 psi.

I would hold off on the Blur for now, it's about due for a redesign.
What sag % did you end up a t?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
506 Posts
Did you take the time to set the suspension up for your weight, as that could have a big effect on the bobbing?
I did. Didn’t set sag per se, but the guy at the shop consulted a chart and inflated it to that, and honestly it could’ve probably been a tad on the high side because I didn’t use all the travel.

Part of me is wondering if my expectations are just too high—it’s been a while since I had a FS bike. And maybe if I owned it I could figure out how to dial it in. It’s just a big risk to spend an enormous amount of money on a toy and not like it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
356 Posts
I did. Didn’t set sag per se, but the guy at the shop consulted a chart and inflated it to that, and honestly it could’ve probably been a tad on the high side because I didn’t use all the travel.

Part of me is wondering if my expectations are just too high—it’s been a while since I had a FS bike. And maybe if I owned it I could figure out how to dial it in. It’s just a big risk to spend an enormous amount of money on a toy and not like it.
I just got back from a training ride. My road bike broke so Im doing hard efforts on the MTB. Saying there is no bob would be a lie. Even DW bikes bob you just dont feel it. The only FS bikes that dont bob are bikes with the brain or livevalve.

That said, this bike pedals better than my Spark RC did in the traction mode and that was a pretty good bike. Definetly pedals better than the pivot mach 4 I tested in 2019. Dare I say as good as a Ripley.

If anything should be upgraded its the wheels and the fork. You can drop a ton of weight upgrading the wheels. The Select Charger RC damper does okay but its not very tunable and unless you fit the average riding style snd weight it doesnt feel very good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
What sag % did you end up a t?
Between 25 and 30%. I wish I could give you a more exact number but the sag measurement is pretty imprecise, I'd suggest adjusting the shock pressure 5 psi at a time until it rides the way you want. This bike should ride pretty high in it's travel and feel on the firm side. From the several hundred miles I've got on it it's definitely not bottomless feeling like my old Tallboy 3 however that's not what I was looking for when I bought it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Overall, I thought it was a really confident descender, but I wasn’t wild about how it pedaled in the open setting. Since the shock (Rockshox Delux+ I think?) only had an open setting and a sorta closed setting, I did a lot of bobbing, especially on the fire road sections. I think that if I got one of these, that’d probably be the first thing I’d swap out.
I noticed when my rebound was set too fast, the bob was noticeably worse. Slowed the rebound, no more bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Friend is looking at a used Evo. Attached is seat stay pic. I'm no expert but this looks surface and superficial.... Any real damage here?
1925134
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,106 Posts
Has anyone weighed the stock dropper off an an Epic EVO comp? Wondering if I can keep the same drop or get a little more with something that will save at least 100g.

also, if anyone has a line on a Race Day Damper (non-remote lockout), Q has them in stock in March of 2022... The charger 2.1 will not work in the 35mm SID.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Has anyone weighed the stock dropper off an an Epic EVO comp? Wondering if I can keep the same drop or get a little more with something that will save at least 100g.

also, if anyone has a line on a Race Day Damper (non-remote lockout), Q has them in stock in March of 2022... The charger 2.1 will not work in the 35mm SID.
According to X-Fusion, the manic dropper is around 575gr for a 125mm travel. I'm running a 9Point8 Fall Line R 30.9x150 and it's 414gr so 150gr lighter and I think it might be the lightest dropper in 150mm travel.
 

·
mosstrooper
Joined
·
173 Posts
Various digressions into unrelated issues aside, this has turned into an excellent thread -- stoked to have so many folks sharing experiences on the new Epic Evo. It's been gratifying to realize that, although not many folks in the rocky/steep/wet Northeast are transitioning to an "overgrown XC bike" anytime soon, the rest of the riding world is slightly better informed and knows what's up. :)

To provide a smidgeon of a contribution to the general discourse, I thought I'd share my experience of riding the Epic Evo in the past four weeks since I got it built up. The short version, for those less inclined to read further, is that it's by far the most descending-capable XC bike I've ever ridden; but then again, is it even an XC bike?! The background on myself is that I've been on a succession of Epics (first "regular"/race and then an Epic Evo, first with a slightly more race-oriented build in 2019 and then a more trail build with 900g tires, 30mm rims and a longer-stroke dropper in 2020). I was extremely excited to get my hands on the 2021 Epic Evo and make the jump to the slack-XC, aggressive XC, "downcountry," however you call it category. Of course, I had to wait around until my frame finally showed up last month to spend any substantial amount of time on one. As I have it built up now with an XL frame, the forest-gnome-green ripper sits at 24.7lbs, which (fittingly) is exactly the same weight as my racier old Epic Evo build, though with substantially more rally-able build kit: Sid Ultimate fork at 120mm and SidLuxe 190x40, XTR M9100 drivetrain (10-45 cassette) w/NextSL cranks and a 34T AbsoluteBlack ring, 180mm OneUp dropper post shimmed to 170mm, WAO Faction rims on Hydras with Aerolites front and Aero Comps rear (430g rims, ~1650g wheelset?), Ardent Race 2.35 3C EXO rear/Rekon 2.4WT 3C EXO front with XC Cush Core front and rear, Syntace Flatforce/Enve M6 cockpit, XTR Race pedals, ODI Vapor grips, Cannibal cages..

The massively impressive thing about the new bike, by my lights, is also the major (only) disappointment: the bike, at least as I have it built, has a serious case of "jack of all trades, master of none"-ism. I've taken the bike out on quick morning training missions on tight backyard woods trails here in northern NE -- hopping stone walls, carving flat corners, pumping through root gaps -- and also on the more serious enormo-gnar descents in Pisgah and Shenandoah, and not found it seriously wanting in either case. Sure, I'd prefer a "true" (that is, old-school) XC race bike with a higher BB and steeper HTA on my backyard stuff, if only because it would let me ride less aggressively and less elbows-out on the front wheel, and I'd take a 30lb. Stumpy Evo with light-ish tires for ripping down Bennett Gap/Pilot Rock/Reddish Knob/etc. any day of the week (if only because I'd feel less thrashed the next day). But, with a bit of suspension tuning (adding volume spacers in the Sid Ultimate does wonders for changing the feel of the fork, much moreso than on the Stepcast 34) to make the suspension more progressive for those smashy big descents, and more linear/supple for those traction-limited NE trails, the bike does feel like it can adapt to both scenarios.

Is it unreasonable to call this the "winch-and-plummet" XC bike? My perception has always been that XC bikes should shine on rolling, punchy, pedally terrain, and that if one is riding a lot of big climbs and descents that demand low gearing on the ups and high speeds on the downs, better to be flogging an enduro bike, or at least a more progressive-geo trail bike. But the extra-low frame weight on the Epic Evo makes it a worthy choice for those lengthy fire-road grinds to get to the top of gnarly descents, even with a not-so-steep seat angle that would typically make such climbs a chore. And on the downs.... good lord!! Between the HTA, the low BB, and the 44mm offset fork (and, in my case, CushCore and a decently sticky front tire), the Epic Evo is out-of-this-world fast. Fast enough to make drifting into corners start to seem like a reasonable option... to make me wish it was a few pounds heavier to keep it more planted and stable... to make a longer rear-end (say, 445mm) seem reasonable to balance out the front-center on the XL.

So it's fast, it's light, it goes downhill like an absolute maniac (especially in open, get-off-the-brakes, run-and-gun terrain), it's got plenty of clearance for a 2.4" rear tire with room for mud... What more could you want out of the bike?! Nothing, really, except to say that it makes my eye twitch to describe it as an "XC bike." When I build an XC bike, I want it to feel well-matched for running 2.25 Rocket Rons or Aspens, a 65mm dropper post, pinner wheels, dual remote lockouts, and basically anything else that would make me feel like I can stay on the gas at hour 6 of a 100-mile NUE race (gotta finish ahead of DFL, after all!) It would be a crying shame to build an Epic Evo this way, IMO. For now, in my quiver, it's a do-it-all, ride-anywhere rig with a particular specialty in big backcountry missions. Would I recommend it to someone who lived in my neighborhood, mostly rode locally, and did a bunch of XC racing? No. Would I recommend it to anyone -- anyone else, that is -- who wanted the lightest, ripping-est bike on the market? Yes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
Various digressions into unrelated issues aside, this has turned into an excellent thread -- stoked to have so many folks sharing experiences on the new Epic Evo. It's been gratifying to realize that, although not many folks in the rocky/steep/wet Northeast are transitioning to an "overgrown XC bike" anytime soon, the rest of the riding world is slightly better informed and knows what's up. :)

To provide a smidgeon of a contribution to the general discourse, I thought I'd share my experience of riding the Epic Evo in the past four weeks since I got it built up. The short version, for those less inclined to read further, is that it's by far the most descending-capable XC bike I've ever ridden; but then again, is it even an XC bike?! The background on myself is that I've been on a succession of Epics (first "regular"/race and then an Epic Evo, first with a slightly more race-oriented build in 2019 and then a more trail build with 900g tires, 30mm rims and a longer-stroke dropper in 2020). I was extremely excited to get my hands on the 2021 Epic Evo and make the jump to the slack-XC, aggressive XC, "downcountry," however you call it category. Of course, I had to wait around until my frame finally showed up last month to spend any substantial amount of time on one. As I have it built up now with an XL frame, the forest-gnome-green ripper sits at 24.7lbs, which (fittingly) is exactly the same weight as my racier old Epic Evo build, though with substantially more rally-able build kit: Sid Ultimate fork at 120mm and SidLuxe 190x40, XTR M9100 drivetrain (10-45 cassette) w/NextSL cranks and a 34T AbsoluteBlack ring, 180mm OneUp dropper post shimmed to 170mm, WAO Faction rims on Hydras with Aerolites front and Aero Comps rear (430g rims, ~1650g wheelset?), Ardent Race 2.35 3C EXO rear/Rekon 2.4WT 3C EXO front with XC Cush Core front and rear, Syntace Flatforce/Enve M6 cockpit, XTR Race pedals, ODI Vapor grips, Cannibal cages..

The massively impressive thing about the new bike, by my lights, is also the major (only) disappointment: the bike, at least as I have it built, has a serious case of "jack of all trades, master of none"-ism. I've taken the bike out on quick morning training missions on tight backyard woods trails here in northern NE -- hopping stone walls, carving flat corners, pumping through root gaps -- and also on the more serious enormo-gnar descents in Pisgah and Shenandoah, and not found it seriously wanting in either case. Sure, I'd prefer a "true" (that is, old-school) XC race bike with a higher BB and steeper HTA on my backyard stuff, if only because it would let me ride less aggressively and less elbows-out on the front wheel, and I'd take a 30lb. Stumpy Evo with light-ish tires for ripping down Bennett Gap/Pilot Rock/Reddish Knob/etc. any day of the week (if only because I'd feel less thrashed the next day). But, with a bit of suspension tuning (adding volume spacers in the Sid Ultimate does wonders for changing the feel of the fork, much moreso than on the Stepcast 34) to make the suspension more progressive for those smashy big descents, and more linear/supple for those traction-limited NE trails, the bike does feel like it can adapt to both scenarios.

Is it unreasonable to call this the "winch-and-plummet" XC bike? My perception has always been that XC bikes should shine on rolling, punchy, pedally terrain, and that if one is riding a lot of big climbs and descents that demand low gearing on the ups and high speeds on the downs, better to be flogging an enduro bike, or at least a more progressive-geo trail bike. But the extra-low frame weight on the Epic Evo makes it a worthy choice for those lengthy fire-road grinds to get to the top of gnarly descents, even with a not-so-steep seat angle that would typically make such climbs a chore. And on the downs.... good lord!! Between the HTA, the low BB, and the 44mm offset fork (and, in my case, CushCore and a decently sticky front tire), the Epic Evo is out-of-this-world fast. Fast enough to make drifting into corners start to seem like a reasonable option... to make me wish it was a few pounds heavier to keep it more planted and stable... to make a longer rear-end (say, 445mm) seem reasonable to balance out the front-center on the XL.

So it's fast, it's light, it goes downhill like an absolute maniac (especially in open, get-off-the-brakes, run-and-gun terrain), it's got plenty of clearance for a 2.4" rear tire with room for mud... What more could you want out of the bike?! Nothing, really, except to say that it makes my eye twitch to describe it as an "XC bike." When I build an XC bike, I want it to feel well-matched for running 2.25 Rocket Rons or Aspens, a 65mm dropper post, pinner wheels, dual remote lockouts, and basically anything else that would make me feel like I can stay on the gas at hour 6 of a 100-mile NUE race (gotta finish ahead of DFL, after all!) It would be a crying shame to build an Epic Evo this way, IMO. For now, in my quiver, it's a do-it-all, ride-anywhere rig with a particular specialty in big backcountry missions. Would I recommend it to someone who lived in my neighborhood, mostly rode locally, and did a bunch of XC racing? No. Would I recommend it to anyone -- anyone else, that is -- who wanted the lightest, ripping-est bike on the market? Yes.
I agree that it is a Jack of all trades master of none. I use mine as a gravel bike some times, commute every day on it and then ride black trails on the weekend with it. There are bikes that could do each one of these things better but this one is 85-95% of any one of those bikes. Unless I win the lottery I’m not going to buy a bike that suits each one of those categories. Instead I have a second set of wheels and tires to suit the terrain. I never even intended to ride black trails when I bought the bike but with better traction tires the bike runs down and up them very well. I won’t beat an enduro bike down any time but I don’t care, I’m excited I can ride up a gravel road fast and comfortably then go down a nasty trail that I used to avoid.
 

·
mosstrooper
Joined
·
173 Posts
I agree that it is a Jack of all trades master of none. I use mine as a gravel bike some times, commute every day on it and then ride black trails on the weekend with it. There are bikes that could do each one of these things better but this one is 85-95% of any one of those bikes. Unless I win the lottery I’m not going to buy a bike that suits each one of those categories. Instead I have a second set of wheels and tires to suit the terrain. I never even intended to ride black trails when I bought the bike but with better traction tires the bike runs down and up them very well. I won’t beat an enduro bike down any time but I don’t care, I’m excited I can ride up a gravel road fast and comfortably then go down a nasty trail that I used to avoid.
Very well said, I like your succinct manner :) I don't think it's so much a matter of building a "better" bike (how do we define "better," besides faster times?) so much as curating a cohesive bike that brings together all the elements that are well suited to your riding. If you are riding a lot of tighty, twisty, rocky terrain with relatively low speeds, the Epic Evo won't be ideal, especially if you also favor lighter/narrower tires. That's why some will go with "true" XC bikes, and I can respect that choice even if those bikes are starting to seem a tad dated.

Your last line, I think, is bang-on. A bike like this one is allowing a more XC-minded rider to tackle tougher terrain in style, irrespective of whether or not we call it an "XC bike." Of course, there are terrific enduro bikes out there, too! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
Various digressions into unrelated issues aside, this has turned into an excellent thread -- stoked to have so many folks sharing experiences on the new Epic Evo.
Agree, but there is one trade the Evo is a master of: Ultra trail races, or long trail adventures. Mapped out a ride this weekend heading into a lot of unknown. Close to 5 hours of mostly rolling "natural" singletrack (we only have that kind in Norway - public hiking stuff), with some gravel & asphalt thrown in, plus a few excellent downhills and proper nasty tech climbing. I was in sunday ride mode, so taking it easy - backpack with coffee & snacks, etc. Found I PR'd everything I've ridden before, even made some top 10s on segments I'd never seen, even though the conditions were far from optimal with overnight rain, some ice and obligatory headwind. Ran Ground Control 2.3's for that middleweight usefulness.

To be honest, I'm only holding back a bit on my Evo because it is just so pretty & damn expensive. Getting back on my winter bike - an upgraded '17 Stumpy yesterday felt like I was dragging an anchor everywhere.

Compared to my sef evo'ed '18 Epic, this is a major jump up in comfort, handling and effectiveness. And it's a totally different bike to the '16 Epic. This one doesn't bite me when I'm getting a hint of tiredness, and I'm fully confident bombing down stuff that normally would have me on 160mm+ of suspension.

Hope the world opens this summer so I can take it to the races. An all-day trail ultra or two would be a dream on this rig.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
I’ve been pretty interested in one of these for a while - I sold my previous bike back in June of 2020, and didn’t realize it’d be so tough to get something to replace it so I’ve been on my Crux (gravelly cx bike) exclusively for the past 8ish months.
View attachment 1924967
Anyways, I rented one (Epic Evo Comp) today and hit up some Pisgah trails with it. I did Trace/Spencer/Fletcher, for anyone in the area that knows the trails. Overall, I thought it was a really confident descender, but I wasn’t wild about how it pedaled in the open setting. Since the shock (Rockshox Delux+ I think?) only had an open setting and a sorta closed setting, I did a lot of bobbing, especially on the fire road sections. I think that if I got one of these, that’d probably be the first thing I’d swap out.

I’d like to try out a Santa Cruz Blur, compare the pedaling performance and see how much I give up on descending. Problem is that nobody rents those around here.

Anyways, other mentions on the stock build - the four piston SLX brakes were awesome, and the Power saddle was also really comfortable. I might get one for my gravel bike. Also, the Shimano bottom of the barrel hubs weren’t bad either, that was a pleasant surprise.
The Power saddle is great - I have them on 2 other bikes (Diverge and '93 Stumpjumper)!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
431 Posts
Agree, but there is one trade the Evo is a master of: Ultra trail races, or long trail adventures. Mapped out a ride this weekend heading into a lot of unknown. Close to 5 hours of mostly rolling "natural" singletrack (we only have that kind in Norway - public hiking stuff), with some gravel & asphalt thrown in, plus a few excellent downhills and proper nasty tech climbing. I was in sunday ride mode, so taking it easy - backpack with coffee & snacks, etc. Found I PR'd everything I've ridden before, even made some top 10s on segments I'd never seen, even though the conditions were far from optimal with overnight rain, some ice and obligatory headwind. Ran Ground Control 2.3's for that middleweight usefulness.

To be honest, I'm only holding back a bit on my Evo because it is just so pretty & damn expensive. Getting back on my winter bike - an upgraded '17 Stumpy yesterday felt like I was dragging an anchor everywhere.

Compared to my sef evo'ed '18 Epic, this is a major jump up in comfort, handling and effectiveness. And it's a totally different bike to the '16 Epic. This one doesn't bite me when I'm getting a hint of tiredness, and I'm fully confident bombing down stuff that normally would have me on 160mm+ of suspension.

Hope the world opens this summer so I can take it to the races. An all-day trail ultra or two would be a dream on this rig.
 
1261 - 1280 of 1662 Posts
Top