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Thanks for posting the pictures! I guess you don't have any intel on the carbon models? I'm curious to know if they plan to steepen up the seat tube to match the aluminum model.
Doubt they'd steepen the STA on the carbon models since new molds cost a lot of money. Trek is probably waiting for a complete redesign or total update to address the slack STA on the carbon models. So for MY 2021, we'll probably see a new Slash with new geo, and hopefully, no more Re:Aktiv. Or who knows? Maybe the updated carbon Slash will be one with a steeper STA and stick around for another 3-5 years.

Trek is killing it with these sweet as paint jobs though. Every new model I've seen has fantastic paint schemes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The Trek Fuel EX, Trek Remedy, and Trek Slash were all new bikes for 2017. The Remedy was updated last year. Rumor has the Fuel EX being updated to 140mm/140mm for 2020. I'm not sure Trek would leave only the Slash as not being updated since 2017. Long travel enduro 29ers are very popular right now.
 

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The 2020 Slash models are now showing on the Australian site. Carbon models look unchanged from last year. Only black models for the 9.8 & 9.9 in Australia and 2 colour options for the Slash 8. No 9.7 option for Australia.
Slash 8- https://www.trekbikes.com/au/en_AU/...lash-8-29/p/24328/?colorCode=reddark_pinkdark
Slash 9.8- https://www.trekbikes.com/au/en_AU/...s/slash/slash-9-8-29/p/28516/?colorCode=black
Slash 9.9- https://www.trekbikes.com/au/en_AU/...s/slash/slash-9-9-29/p/28517/?colorCode=black
 

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The 2020 Slash models are now showing on the Australian site. Carbon models look unchanged from last year. Only black models for the 9.8 & 9.9 in Australia and 2 colour options for the Slash 8. No 9.7 option for Australia.
Slash 8- https://www.trekbikes.com/au/en_AU/...lash-8-29/p/24328/?colorCode=reddark_pinkdark

Slash 9.8- https://www.trekbikes.com/au/en_AU/...s/slash/slash-9-8-29/p/28516/?colorCode=black
Slash 9.9- https://www.trekbikes.com/au/en_AU/...s/slash/slash-9-9-29/p/28517/?colorCode=black
Thanks for the links! So it looks like the geometry hasn't changed, although the offset on the forks is now 42 vs 51. Also, both the seat and chain stays are carbon on the 9.8. The only other real difference between the 9.8 and 9.9 are XO vs GX drivetrain, Lyrik Ulitmate vs Lyrik Select Plus, XT brakes vs SRAM G2 RSC, and both bikes are the exact same colour. Not sure if the XO drivetrain, Lyrik Ultimate, and XT brakes warrant a $3000 premium.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Whelp that's sad. Looks like the Slash 8 is a better bike than the carbon models for another year. I didn't think Trek would leave the development cycle this long given their history.
Yeah I'm very surprised too. Seat tube angle has become one of the most talked about points on a modern mountain bike, and the Slash carbon is still lacking in this regard. I bought my 19 Slash 8 over a 18 9.7 for this reason. The bikes were the same price with a sale and less then a pound difference in weight. I got better components on the Slash 8 too. I wonder how the Fuel EX will end up.
 

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Yeah I'm very surprised too. Seat tube angle has become one of the most talked about points on a modern mountain bike, and the Slash carbon is still lacking in this regard. I bought my 19 Slash 8 over a 18 9.7 for this reason. The bikes were the same price with a sale and less then a pound difference in weight. I got better components on the Slash 8 too. I wonder how the Fuel EX will end up.
It has become the most talked about, and frankly I think the criticism is ridiculous. For the record I have a 2019 Slash 9.8, and previously spent a couple days on a 2019 aluminum 8 with the steeper seat tube angle. I can tell absolutely no difference and I'm guessing most others can't either. If you need your seat a little bit further forward, slide it forward on the rails and magically you have the same seated pedaling position as you would with a steeper seat tube angle.

This is a slack, 150/160, 29er, enduro racing smash machine built to go really fast downhill, but still pedal REASONABLY well back uphill. It's not a cross country race bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
It has become the most talked about, and frankly I think the criticism is ridiculous. For the record I have a 2019 Slash 9.8, and previously spent a couple days on a 2019 aluminum 8 with the steeper seat tube angle. I can tell absolutely no difference and I'm guessing most others can't either. If you need your seat a little bit further forward, slide it forward on the rails and magically you have the same seated pedaling position as you would with a steeper seat tube angle.

This is a slack, 150/160, 29er, enduro racing smash machine built to go really fast downhill, but still pedal REASONABLY well back uphill. It's not a cross country race bike.
Then why did they steepen the seat tube angle on the Slash 8? Why is every other manufacturer going to steeper seat tube angles? I have my seat slammed as far forward as it will go. The bike still wanders on super steep climbs. This is with the flip chip in the high position. I'd still prefer an even steeper seat tube angle. I did not get as much wander on the same trails when I demoed a Ripmo.
 

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Then why did they steepen the seat tube angle on the Slash 8? Why is every other manufacturer going to steeper seat tube angles? I have my seat slammed as far forward as it will go. The bike still wanders on super steep climbs. This is with the flip chip in the high position. I'd still prefer an even steeper seat tube angle. I did not get as much wander on the same trails when I demoed a Ripmo.
This is a good discussion, and I don't doubt all that what you're saying is true and your bike is wandering on you. I just think that there are so many other factors that can play into that besides seat tube angle. Handlebar height, reach, natural body position, suspension sag all play a role in it, it isn't as simple as seat tube angle. If someone is riding a model that is the correct size for them, the seat is slammed forward on the rails, and they're still having issues, I think it's very unlikely that a steeper seat tube angle will make a significant difference.

I also think it's important to remember that a steeper seat tube angle simply puts the saddle closer to the handlebars, unless you want to put a longer stem on your bike to compensate and maintain that comfortable cockpit, which none of us are scrambling to do. So unless you plan to run a longer stem, you have to be willing to accept that a steeper seat tube angle is going to put your knees closer to your handlebars when you're seated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I think to do it correctly the whole bike needs to be designed around the steeper seat tube angle. If you look at the aluminum vs the carbon Slash, Trek only changed the seat tube angle. Therefore the effective top tube length went down by 10mm, so you are actually closer to the bars than you would be. I also think seat tube angle may matter more for longer legged riders. The further you have your seat out of the seat post, the further back over the rear wheel you are. I'm 6ft with a 34in inseam. I tried the XL and it just felt too big. So I went with a large, but need to have the seat pretty far up.
 

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I think to do it correctly the whole bike needs to be designed around the steeper seat tube angle. If you look at the aluminum vs the carbon Slash, Trek only changed the seat tube angle. Therefore the effective top tube length went down by 10mm, so you are actually closer to the bars than you would be. I also think seat tube angle may matter more for longer legged riders. The further you have your seat out of the seat post, the further back over the rear wheel you are. I'm 6ft with a 34in inseam. I tried the XL and it just felt too big. So I went with a large, but need to have the seat pretty far up.
That's a good point. I'm 5-10 and riding a 19.5, but I have a super long inseam for my height (also 34 inches), so I have a ton of seatpost sticking out as well.
 

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Kind of a bummer they are still pushing the RS/Trek thru-shaft. I found this shock to be seriously lackluster vs other options.
Best pedaling long-travel shock I've ever had. Suits me, since I'm using the Slash as a rugged trail bike (mostly moto and OHV trail stuff).

But when I really push it on downhill uber-chunk, the RS shock's limits are found.
 

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Thru shaft is cool in theory, but the DPX2/DHX2/X2 look to accomplish similar results.... sooooo much better.


Interestingly and anecdotally, someone at our store just took off their thru-shaft shock , bought a take off non thru-shaft version of the otherwise identical re:activ shock..... says it's way better. lol.
 
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