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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi all, I asked this over at PinkBike but asking here too.

I am after some advice on how best to approach setting up my Fox Float 34 Rhythm (2020), with a view to everyday trail riding and also mild bike park riding (no big hits, mainly flow such as the Runca or Neverend trails in Laax which I ride often).

The bike is a 2020 Radon Skeen Trail cf 9.0 (130f/120r), 29er. I am a bigger rider at ~105kg with kit. I am using a Shockwiz to help set up the fork, which helped hugely in the past, but seems not to help this time!

(I previouslty had a YT Capra with a 180mm Lyric - I put 2 tokens in it and did the Debonair upgrade, all was fine and I got it feeling very good (althought I preferred the small bump compiance on the Fox 36 I had before). I took a few weeks to get the settings, then didn't change them for 2 years, but in the end just didn't need all the travel for what I ride.)

For this bike, I adjusted the air pressure in the Fox 34 to my weight (120psi, along with setting rebound etc) with the GRIP setting on 'full open' as per the manual, but it ploughs through most travel very easily. I was riding a DH(ish) flow trail today and had huge fork bob under hard pedalling, even with the max air pressure in there.

With Max pressure (and a little over) I get 35%+ sag, but with the damper closed I get about 5%. The Shockwiz keeps saying to add more air, but I am now already at the max...

I am wondering - do I turn the GRIP damper to be more closed for trail riding? Or should I set it up to be perfect when fully open? I was thinking of adding some tokens, or an MRP Cartridge... or maybe I am just missing the point of GRIP as I am more used to an 'set and forget' fork.

Any help appreciated as it's driving me a bit mad at the minute!
 

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I'm 183 lbs and needed two tokens to keep my 140mm 34 rhythm from bottoming.
IMO the GRIP can be used to do what you're after but I find a proper setup works better as there's less messing around on the trails.
Also, keeping your PSI the same and adding 2 - 4 tokens should get you into a better sag percentage (15 - 20%).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks both - after some more testing, I was able to set the sag correctly at 'fully open' to 15-20%, which seems about right. First ride out and I am again deep into the travel on quiet trails.

I'll try out a few spacers and see how it goes.
 

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You need some compression damping on that GRIP2. Start with 14 - 16 clicks out on HSC and about 7 - 8 on LSC. That should give you more support and help stop bottoming it out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You need some compression damping on that GRIP2. Start with 14 - 16 clicks out on HSC and about 7 - 8 on LSC. That should give you more support and help stop bottoming it out.
Thanks for the reply - I have the standard GRIP on a rhythm fork, so don't think I have these options sadly :(
 

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You should not be getting 35% sag with 120psi at your weight, it should be about 15%. Have you tried a second pump to make sure your gauge it not way off? Likewise, static sag is not affected by your damper. Fox forks tend to like to be at about 15-20% static sag. Until you figure out why you are at 35%, you will not get the fork to work correctly.
 

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Adding compression will fix that.
Unfortunately it will also add a bit of harshness as the compression control on that fork adds both low and high speed. That said, the only two options are more pressure or more compression. I have three more suggestions that may potentially help, but they are last ditch suggestions:
  • Rebound- Try a couple clicks less and see how it feels. It is possible that the fork is getting pulled down in its travel by excessive rebound dampening.
  • Lower Service- Many Fox forks have too much grease on the air spring head and in the negative side of the spring. The result is using less pressure to get sag right, at the expense of midstroke support. Drop the lowers and make sure yours isn't packed full of grease. If it is clean it, put new oil in, and try again with 5-10 psi more.
  • Tokens- We never got clarification if your pump was accurate. But in general, use air pressure to set the feel of the fork for the initial 1/2 of travel and use air spacers to control bottoming. In your case if you are not bottoming, take a spacer out and add more air pressure. This is again assuming that you have confirmed the negative side isn't filled with grease, and 2) your pump is accurate and you are not exceeding maximum pressure for the fork.
Ultimately the solution may be a different fork that is a little beefier, a Pike, 36, Diamond, or Mezzer, set down to 130-140mm. At 105kg, I think you are right at the limit of the 34 at 130mm.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks a lot Cary, I double checked my pump, and it was ~10% off - I've used another to set pressure correctly now, and I can get the sag to ~15%. I did a 20km XC like loop last night with it like this, and it felt better, but I ended up having to move the GRIP damper about 25% to the 'firm' side (from open) to get a decent balance for general riding.

I've now removed a few clicks of rebound as you recommend. I had it at 3 from closed, Fox too actually recommended 1 from closed - hopefully this will help.

I now have 4 tokens on order - I'll try with 2 to begin with, and see how we go!
 
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