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Things I like and should have been implemented on the OG Django 29:

- The shock mount no longer collects water and dirt as there are holes for stuff to escape!
- The bike comes with frame protection
- It comes without the silly DT Swiss rear axle (or am I wrong on this?)
- Some sizes actually have a decent length on the chainstay!


Things I don't like:

- Well, the first is obvious: rear spacing/superboost
- The geometry is really close to Troy, so the difference on a medium is basically the amount of travel. Interesting. A bit like the Pivot Trail429 and Switchblade...
- The new one is uglier IMO but this is subjective
- Price is quite high for spec

Glad I have the original Django 29 with rear spacing that don't kill my knees (-> q-factor grows) and where travel, geometry and build-kit meets. The build on the new bike is kinda heavy-hitting compared to travel. BUT, I have never ridden this bike, only the previous version. It might be the best bike on the planet, who knows? But seeing this new bike does not make me want it as it follows the whole industry in making trailbikes overly aggressive for what they are. All people are not the same though and some will sacrifice all-day fun for a bit more speed on the roughest descents.
 

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When I saw the news, I thought maybe I'd look into the new frame, but reading it is super-boost means I can't just swap stuff over without a rear wheel rebuild and crankset. I wish they'd have left the Troy as their super-boost bike and used this opportunity to clean up some of the little stuff on the Django. It looks like they nailed that stuff - the lower shock mount, improved pivot bearings, carbon chainstays and linkage, frame protection (threaded BB, but I have never really had a problem with PF).

Of course they were going to slack it out a bit to stay current with what everyone else is doing, and I'm glad to see they didn't get as crazy as Santa Cruz did with the new Tallboy. Looks like a fun new bike, but I wish they would have stuck with a 148 rear end for the Django.
 

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What does the Django offer that the Troy doesn't? Seems like a lot of overlap?
 

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What does the Django offer that the Troy doesn't? Seems like a lot of overlap?
My understanding is that the Django falls squarely in the Trail category, while the Troy is All Mountain. I chose the Troy over the Django for the extra travel (with the option to run 160 forks up front) since there is plenty opportunity to negotiate more technical terrain here in Colorado, so the Troy fits the bill as being a better all-arounder for the type of riding I do here. If it weren't for that I think I would've opted for the Django in a 27.5... if that's what you're asking.
 

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Nice looking bike. Looking at the geo, this is really more of a short travel Enduro bike than a Trail bike. Not much of a difference between it and the Troy expect for little less travel and a little lighter.

Devinci should have went the other way with it, designed it around 120/130 fork and much shorter wheelbase. Trail bikes should be playful and easy to ride. This does not look like it would be either in tight twist trail type riding.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Nice looking bike. Looking at the geo, this is really more of a short travel Enduro bike than a Trail bike. Not much of a difference between it and the Troy expect for little less travel and a little lighter.

Devinci should have went the other way with it, designed it around 120/130 fork and much shorter wheelbase. Trail bikes should be playful and easy to ride. This does not look like it would be either in tight twist trail type riding.
This seems to be the type of geometry that gets the better reviews by the professional reviewers. Pinkbike, vital, etc... Good reviews lead to sales.

Ibis Ripley V4 has almost identical angles and Ibis can't keep up with demand.
 

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This seems to be the type of geometry that gets the better reviews by the professional reviewers. Pinkbike, vital, etc... Good reviews lead to sales.

Ibis Ripley V4 has almost identical angles and Ibis can't keep up with demand.
Yep. And it's perceived value and marketing. Hardly anyone knows what a Devinci is compared to the likes of Ibis. And when it comes to resale it's not even close. Put a different sticker on a lot of bikes, and sales skyrocket.
 

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There's also the DW link suspension difference. I actually prefer Devinci's split pivot to pretty much every 4-bar incarnation I've ridden, but fancy suspension seems to sell.
 

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There's also the DW link suspension difference. I actually prefer Devinci's split pivot to pretty much every 4-bar incarnation I've ridden, but fancy suspension seems to sell.
Yeah, I was trying to be kind. I've owned about 6 or 8 DW Links and 1 or 2 Split Pivot. Split Pivot is very good on descents under braking, but it's climbing prowess in loose, rocky, steep and fast sections is below average. Plus the feedback through the pedals in high torque choppy descents is not that good. But most riders don't know or care about that. They buy based on impulse or emotion; I have about 15 years in sports and outdoor marketing and advertising so I dole out the BS as well as anyone, ha.
 

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Based on a photo in one of the reviews, it seems that devinci aren’t using a trunnion mount shock on the new Django. I can’t help but wonder why.

I have a Troy 29er. The new Django is marketed as being able to accept bigger tires than the Troy (2.6 vs 2.4). On the Troy, the limitation seems to be the overall wheel height/short chain stays. I’m curious if the chain and seat stays are interchangeable between the two models.


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Discussion Starter #17

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Maybe its an improvement overall as a bike, But I'm just not a fan of the looks. Similar to the Troy, that Scott-like bend to the top tube doesn't thrill me, and that extra carbon wedge between it and the seat tube just strikes me as fugly.

Do like the full carbon stays, and the downtube and chainstay protection. Not sure whether the 44 offset is a plus or minus. The blue looks sharper in your picture than the stock photos on the website.
 

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Yeah, I was trying to be kind. I've owned about 6 or 8 DW Links and 1 or 2 Split Pivot. Split Pivot is very good on descents under braking, but it's climbing prowess in loose, rocky, steep and fast sections is below average. Plus the feedback through the pedals in high torque choppy descents is not that good. But most riders don't know or care about that. They buy based on impulse or emotion; I have about 15 years in sports and outdoor marketing and advertising so I dole out the BS as well as anyone, ha.
Hmmm, I have a Django and a Pivot 429. I find the Devinci handles better in most circumstances. As far as efficiency with the rear suspension? The Pivot may be a bit snappier but I’d be splitting hairs. I haven’t ridden the Pivot since I got the Devinci, my son is on it now. The split pivot is probably more efficient than most designs. I’d say that calling it below average isn’t accurate at all.
 

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Hmmm, I have a Django and a Pivot 429. I find the Devinci handles better in most circumstances. As far as efficiency with the rear suspension? The Pivot may be a bit snappier but I’d be splitting hairs. I haven’t ridden the Pivot, my son is on it now. The split pivot is probably more efficient than most designs. I’d say that calling it below average isn’t accurate at all.
It's just my opinion based on owning the django carbon for two years, and being an extremely strong climber. It's also just my opinion based on anecdotal evidence of friends witnessing me flail about or ride slower in many trail conditions for those two years that I normally cleaned or sped through with less effort. Since parting ways with the split pivot, my Strava times, KOMs, and the aforementioned anecdotal input have returned to "normal."

Descending, the django was very good. Compared to my Ripley V4 with the same parts spec, it's not even in the same league as a climber whether seated or standing.

Climbing in many situations, I'll stick with my opinion that the django was below average especially in the low-chip position. Too much leverage and I don't think it was a true 74.5 STA; the sag had to be decreased to keep it from riding too low and bobbing under power.

To each their own. I'm much happier not spending all day climbing on a Split Pivot especially in steep, loose, rocky conditions.
 
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