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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, thought I would share my recent problems with the new Stumpjumper.

bought one of the new designed Stumpjumper's this spring, and a couple of months later "over torqued" a bolt while trying to change the flip chip. The bolt snapped in maybe the worst place it could have, the top linkage of the shock. Because of the asymmetrical design, I now have part of a bolt stuck in the sidearm, making it near impossible to drill out. Maybe I'm unlucky, as my torque wrench was set to under the recommended torque spec when it cracked. Hopefully warranty will cover this:madman:.
 

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Seems like another situation of torque wrench causing problem.

There was a recent thread where somebody broke a bolt (or broke something) using a torque wrench.

In my head, it seems we rely on the torque wrench because we should believe that is the correct way. However, in doing so, we do not use our own logic and let the wrench tell us when it's too tight.

1) we don't always let our instincts control the situation when using the tool recommended for the job
2) there are +/- tolerances in each tool. Perhaps your tolerance is greater (at that torque setting) than another tool.

What is the torque rating on that bolt and what torque wrench do you use?



Is it possible to get a long drill bit and drill the bolt? But then you need to be super careful the long bit doesn't wander. Then a matter of getting the extractor tool to fit in there.
Can you cut the linkage out then purchase a new part or is it that the frame is in the way, not the link arm?

That's a sucky solution, but if that is the only thing in the way it can become a sacrificial part.
 

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Single(Pivot)and Happy
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Take your mess to a shop that can perform the necessary task. This may not be a bike shop. I wouldn't want someone that may be working during summer break to touch my bikes, let alone perform a very skilled task that if not done correctly will result in a high monetary cost and time off the bike.

Considering the 10's of 1000's of 2018 Stumpy's out in the wild, I'm going to have to say I do not see how this situation can be labeled a design flaw.
 

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If you're interested in pursuing a warranty claim on this, you'll have to take it to a Spec dealer. Try to find a shop that has legit mechs working on bikes. FWIW, I think the chances of succeeding on a claim would be slim to none.
 

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Underskilled
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Yeesh talk about a bunch of negative people.

He used a torque wrench, a bolt failed.

It happens, a lot.

Every time this happens to me I've had full manufacturer support.

I've got 4 torque wrenches at home, from cheapo eBay to mid-range CRC.

When I snapped my first bolt I took them into work to check against the calibrated units.

Every single one (including the POS eBay job) came in within 1nm of the calibrated unit.

Manufacturer asked for a photo of my torque wrench (they admitted later that is was to check it was a nm torqe not inch/lb) and solved.

Has anyone considered the possibility that the screw had a manufacturing fault?
 

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Yeah, some of the posts have been rather harsh. This kind of thing has probably happened to all of us. I know I've been there. But seriously OP, blaming your problem on a design flaw is out of line. I agree with the others that the chances are slim of fixing this under warranty unless there is a known issue with those bolts. The important thing now is to get your bike to an authorized Spec shop and have a mechanic take a look at it. Absolutely do not try to extract the broken bolt yourself. If you mess up the frame doing this you'll have an even bigger, more expensive problem on your hands. Good luck!
 

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Single(Pivot)and Happy
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Yeesh talk about a bunch of negative people.

He used a torque wrench, a bolt failed.

It happens, a lot.

Every time this happens to me I've had full manufacturer support.

I've got 4 torque wrenches at home, from cheapo eBay to mid-range CRC.

When I snapped my first bolt I took them into work to check against the calibrated units.

Every single one (including the POS eBay job) came in within 1nm of the calibrated unit.

Manufacturer asked for a photo of my torque wrench (they admitted later that is was to check it was a nm torqe not inch/lb) and solved.

Has anyone considered the possibility that the screw had a manufacturing fault?
Who responded negative in this thread? Everyone advised taking the frame to someone that knows what they are doing. I understand everyone doesn't think like I do, but if I snap a bolt I'm not going online and starting a thread in a forum which gets 10,000's hits a day and suggest "manufacturer design flaw."
 

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I can understand the "design flaw" comment as in, if/when others break a bolt it will be very difficult to extract said bolt. It's not impossible to have another broken bold.

Maybe it broke really easily. Maybe OP's torque wrench isn't accurate. Maybe torque wrench wasn't set properly. Maybe the bolt was greased and said torque value was altered due to the grease. Could have simply been operator error or faulty tools.

Still figure this one is best suited for some type of shop specializing in bolt extraction to take on the task. Also, IF this is a skilled machine shop, for example, should be noted to the shop dudes that the bike WILL not be damaged during bolt removal. If shop dudes will not guarantee any bike blemishes, continue shopping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
alright bois, I've been out of town for a week and I have come back to very good news. Before posting this thread I brought it to my LBS (Erik's bike shop), to see what they could do. They tried to drill it out, but were unsuccessful, and didn't want to drill through the frame. Specialized warrantied it, and instead of giving me another short travel stumpjumper, they let me pick a new bike at the same price. I ended up upgrading to the Stumpjumper 29 pro (navy colored with kashima coating as the accent color). They said the bolt shouldn't have blown up like that at the certain torque spec, and that it was the bolt.

Long story short, I got a better bike :thumbsup:

I don't really consider the design to be flawed, because the odds of someone else doing the exact thing on the upper eye bolt would be slim to none. Just something to consider and talk about I guess.
 

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alright bois, I've been out of town for a week and I have come back to very good news. Before posting this thread I brought it to my LBS (Erik's bike shop), to see what they could do. They tried to drill it out, but were unsuccessful, and didn't want to drill through the frame. Specialized warrantied it, and instead of giving me another short travel stumpjumper, they let me pick a new bike at the same price. I ended up upgrading to the Stumpjumper 29 pro (navy colored with kashima coating as the accent color). They said the bolt shouldn't have blown up like that at the certain torque spec, and that it was the bolt.

Long story short, I got a better bike :thumbsup:

I don't really consider the design to be flawed, because the odds of someone else doing the exact thing on the upper eye bolt would be slim to none. Just something to consider and talk about I guess.
Great to hear GT :)
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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Torque wrenches are a catch 22. They have to be calibrated and that's not a one-time thing either, so they should be on some kind of schedule for calibration. So a torque wrench is not a guarantee of anything. In the aircraft maintenance world, they are tightly controlled and calibrated for this reason.
 

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Dream it, Do it.
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On the positive side of using torque wrenches, the torque specs for some dw-link suspension lower links feels super high and there is no way I would crank on a bolt that hard with a two foot long wrench unless I knew that is exactly what the torque specs are for that bolt. As an example, the torque spec for the HD4's lower link is 24Nm or about 18 ft-lbs which is applying 18lbs of force to a foot long wrench.
 

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Hoolie Ghoulie on Strava.
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Awesome outcome! What a great deal for you! New bike! Thats really incredible, and
I am so happy for you, and a bit envious. I hope you enjoy riding a brand new bike. In regards to all the negativity at the beginning of this thread, I have recently been thinking about using my real name on MTBR, instead of hoolie (family nickname, My parents said I looked like a little hooligan riding around on my Big Wheel in early '70's). I try to keep things positive and helpful on MTBR, along with a few humorous jabs here and there if I've had a beer, always in good fun. Why not just use my name here, I dont belittle anyone. It is sad to see all the hate on MTBR. Only Mt Bikers that ride in the woods, are really able to understand other Mt Bikers, so it surprises me when people on MTBR are so condescending, and mean spirited. Everyone on MTBR should really be some of my favorite people, on Earth. . We're bike people. Now go sell that crappy brand of frame, and get yourself a REAL bike. Haha J/K on that last part. Enjoy the ride.
 

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Single(Pivot)and Happy
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Again, what "negativity" are you guys talking about? People suggested the OP get assistance, how is that negative?
 
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