Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
141 - 160 of 1576 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,417 Posts
In the end it does not matter what some reviewers say.. If we love the bike, then what they say does not affect how it feels for us.

-Brett
For sure. It matters not at all to Troy owners. It matters a great deal to Devinci and to potential Troy buyers because it could easily shape their opinion enough to steer them to another bike.

I went in to my local dealer a month ago and asked to check out a Troy. They told me none in stock and if I wanted one in a reasonable amount of time I had to put down a deposit and buy it sight unseen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
890 Posts
Discussion Starter · #143 ·
For sure. It matters not at all to Troy owners. It matters a great deal to Devinci and to potential Troy buyers because it could easily shape their opinion enough to steer them to another bike.

I went in to my local dealer a month ago and asked to check out a Troy. They told me none in stock and if I wanted one in a reasonable amount of time I had to put down a deposit and buy it sight unseen.
I see where you are coming from there. I am sure there will be many other reviews on the bike and we all will get to read a larger variety of reviewer opinions.

They would not order one for a demo bike or anything? That is crazy, is there any other Devinci dealers in your area? I could have waited for my shop (Billy Goat Bikes) to get one in, but as soon as it was released, I knew I wanted one. The shop got several demos and even has demo days in the area trails, even their dh bikes.

-Brett
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,417 Posts
They would not order one for a demo bike or anything? That is crazy, is there any other Devinci dealers in your area? I could have waited for my shop (Billy Goat Bikes) to get one in, but as soon as it was released, I knew I wanted one. The shop got several demos and even has demo days in the area trails, even their dh bikes.

-Brett
I believe they had a Troy on order, but with these popular and somewhat rare bikes they come and go so fast if you aren't there on the right day you don't get to see it and if someone else paid a deposit the LBS isn't keen on you doing a whole lot more than look at it.

That's not a Devinci thing.

Of all the bikes I was interested in I could only manage to lay my hands on one of them and that required driving 2 days each way!

My issue with Bike Mag is that it has a big voice and ability to reach a lot of people....so in a 8 minute review you shouldn't spend 3-4 mins harping on something that isn't a critical problem. Just say "They seem to run small. Consider sizing up one or get a test ride before you buy." Then move on to the next point.

If the suspension sucked or something was really messed up with the bike it would deserve a big chunk of the review time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
511 Posts
I guess the take home message is the same as with any bike search; get on the actual bike and see what feels right. Duh. Thanks for everyone's input. Anyone been on both the Carbon Troy and the Carbon Sight for comparison. Much like a lot of folks, if the Troy doesn't feel right, the Carbon Sight 7.2 is my default. Seems like a similar spec and price point, although the Troy XP has the Pike and the Sight is a little cheaper but has the Revelation. Not an insignificant detail. Thanks everyone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,586 Posts
Funny this has come up, while not a Troy, I'm looking at an Atlas and not sure what to make of the numbers. I'm just shy of 5'11" with a 32 inch inseam. I ride a large Tallboy with a 70mm stem and I' trying to decide on a medium or large Atlas.

Of course, no where to try one near me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
511 Posts
Agreed about the review. The emphasis isn't on the actual ride. Valid points about fit. The ride and fit can't be separated, but it seemed as though the ability to climb and descend was a footnote. I would think the latter point would have made up the bulk of the comments. No mention of cornering,small bump sensitivity,square edge hits, the spec. Doesn't seem like a very thorough review from guys whose job it is to provide just that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
429 Posts
Pulpwoody I was thinking of you when referencing riders in that height range that love the M Troy. I'm curious though — did you also try a large?

And also, do you know the length of the stock stem on the medium? I rode a fully stock Alu XP size medium.
No, I didn't try a large, because as soon as I hoped on the medium, it felt great. I don't know about the stock stem, but I'll guess a 70mm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
I just ordered a XL Troy Carbon with a custom X01 build, Pike, and I9 Torchs a week ago so I am exctied to say the least. New Bike Mag came in the mail yesterday....Piss poor review imo. They spend one paragraph talking about Steve smith's A-line win, the next three complaining about the build; bars to narrow, 2x10 instead of x01/xx1. In the fifth paragraph they complain about the cockpit "feeling" short, but say it measures true to advertised geo numbers. That doesn't make any sense to me. It's got the same reach, and a little longer TT then mosts bike, so is the SA super steep? Then in the final paragraph they state that the RR build for $100 more has X01/xx1 and wide Chromag bars, EXACTLY WHAT THEY SPENT THE BULK OF THE REVIEW CRYING ABOUT. Finally in the last setence they talk about how the bike performs by stating that the bike pedals efficinetly because of the DW split pivot Design. Worst Journalism ever??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Has anyone actually taken a tape measure to see what the theoretical top tube measurement is and compared it to what there specs say? I have a shop in NC that did it for me on a medium frame because top tube/front triangle measurement is huge to the overall feel of the bike and its almost an inch off from there specs. Actually measured 23" instead of the 23.89 that they stated in there specs. So I would be interested to see if someone can take a tape to a large frame and see what they are getting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
429 Posts
Funny this has come up, while not a Troy, I'm looking at an Atlas and not sure what to make of the numbers. I'm just shy of 5'11" with a 32 inch inseam. I ride a large Tallboy with a 70mm stem and I' trying to decide on a medium or large Atlas.

Of course, no where to try one near me.

not to derail things, but email Wes at Motorangutang (formerly Pink Gorilla Cycles) that's where I got my Troy from. He and another guy have been riding the Atlas since they came out, and they love them. I think Wes could give you some good insight on sizing. I'll pm you his info.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Has anyone actually taken a tape measure to see what the theoretical top tube measurement is and compared it to what there specs say? I have a shop in NC that did it for me on a medium frame because top tube/front triangle measurement is huge to the overall feel of the bike and its almost an inch off from there specs. Actually measured 23" instead of the 23.89 that they stated in there specs. So I would be interested to see if someone can take a tape to a large frame and see what they are getting.
In that case I am really glad that I ordered an XL, as I have always rode larges. Next time I am in the shop I'll try and measure a few top tubes, and get to the bottom of this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
This is from Matt at Billy Goat Bikes in North Carolina, who is a killer guy by the way and knows his ****.

Medium Troy carbon 22 13/16"
Large Troy carbon 23 5/8"
Large Sight alloy 23 3/4"
Large Banshee spitfire alloy 24"
These were measured parallel to the floor using a level and a tape measure. The Banshee is the only one who actually measures close to what they say it is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
This is from Matt at Billy Goat Bikes in North Carolina, who is a killer guy by the way and knows his ****.

Medium Troy carbon 22 13/16"
Large Troy carbon 23 5/8"
Large Sight alloy 23 3/4"
Large Banshee spitfire alloy 24"
These were measured parallel to the floor using a level and a tape measure. The Banshee is the only one who actually measures close to what they say it is.

I just read through the other Troy thread in the 650B forum and there was quite a few people that measured the TT's and they all ran short as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
Funny this has come up, while not a Troy, I'm looking at an Atlas and not sure what to make of the numbers. I'm just shy of 5'11" with a 32 inch inseam. I ride a large Tallboy with a 70mm stem and I' trying to decide on a medium or large Atlas.

Of course, no where to try one near me.
I'm your hight, but have shorter legs(long torso). I'm running the Large size, and couldn't be happier. I'm running it as a Trail/AM bike and are using a fox 34 talas on it, shorter stem, and wider bars. I would recommend the size L for you. The slack seattube will probably make it unbalanced in a size M, as the seat will be to far back. All recommendations I've heard of, is that if you are in between sizes, go up on the Atlas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,824 Posts
This is from Matt at Billy Goat Bikes in North Carolina, who is a killer guy by the way and knows his ****.

Medium Troy carbon 22 13/16"
Large Troy carbon 23 5/8"
Large Sight alloy 23 3/4"
Large Banshee spitfire alloy 24"
These were measured parallel to the floor using a level and a tape measure. The Banshee is the only one who actually measures close to what they say it is.
The published tt length for the Troy is a virtual or effective measurement. Taking a tape measure and measuring it like we all do won't give you that when you have a bent/curved seat tube or a straight seat tube which doesn't bisect the BB. The ETT will be longer as you can see in the diagram below. (The effective STA will also be different than what you would get by putting an inclinometer on the actual seat tube.)

Here's a primer on the subject from the Knolly forum:

Christmas refresher course:



Words by Noel:

Measuring top tube length is generally considered to be a horizontal line from the center axis of the top of the head tube, that goes backwards and intersects with the seat tube axis. The trick is, what is the difference between TT length and ETT length? On a frame with traditional construction (i.e. where the seat tube axis pierces the BB shell's axis), the ETT length and the TT length are exactly the same.

However, on a frame where the seat tube axis does NOT pierce the BB shell axis, the standard TT length then becomes meaningless because the seat tube angle doesn't mean anything. This is an issue on many, many modern frames, not just Knolly frames. Consider the multitude of frames that have "bent" seat tubes (whether actually bent or hydro-formed aluminum tubes, or are laid up in carbon this way). While the bottom of the seat tube may match up with the BB shell, the seat tube axis (where the seat post is installed into the seat tube) does NOT pierce the BB shell axis. This is extremely common to ensure that there is enough room for the rear wheel / rear linkage under full compression of the frame. On these kinds of frames, the actual seat tube angle cannot be used to make an effective measurement of the top tube length. Additionally, since the actual angle of the seat tube is slacker than the normal range of 72-74 degrees (for an MTB) when the seat is raised, it's hard to get a good indication of where the seat will be a) relative to the BB axis, and b) relative to the head tube.
Hence, the creation of the ETT(Effective Top Tube length). The idea here is to have a "virtual" seat tube: this is essentially an imaginary axis that is at a prescribed angle (i.e. 73 degrees) and this axis is considered to pierce the BB shell axis. On any well designed frame with a seat tube that doesn't pierce the BB shell axis, the actual seat tube and the virtual seat tube should meet up where the saddle would be in a normal pedaling position. When dropped, the saddle will move slightly forwards, away from the virtual seat tube axis. While it's very obvious on our frames (because the seat tube intersects the down tube visually), the same situation exists on many (in fact, most) modern frames with travel more than about 5" because the tire and rear linkage need somewhere to go when fully compressed.

The diagram gives a good idea of what happens here. Obviously, I can't speak for other manufacturers, but the situation shown in the diagram (with the continuous seat tube) is exactly how Knolly frames are designed. There are obviously a few more tweaks than this in determining frame geometry, but this gives the general idea, and how ETT length and TT length are similar, but not quite the same thing. It also explains how we deal with ensuring that we have enough room behind the seat tube for the rear wheel and linkage, while still allowing a full length seat tube to be used in the frame (especially important for medium and small frames and customers using dropper posts).

Assuming that the seat tube angle is reasonable, ETT is the correct measurement when looking to determine the top tube length for fitting frame sizes, as (actual) TT length is meaningless for any frame that doesn't have a seat tube axis that pierces the BB shell axis.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
The published tt length for the Troy is a virtual or effective measurement. Taking a tape measure and measuring it like we all do won't give you that when you have a bent/curved seat tube or a top tube which doesn't bisect the BB. The ETT will be longer as you can see in the diagram below. (The effective STA will also be different than what you would get by putting an inclinometer on the actual seat tube.)

Here's a primer on the subject from the Knolly forum:
Kinda wish they would have labeled it ETT instead of just TT measurement in there geo chart. :) Im still excited to demo the Troy this weekend but I will definitely be trying a Large instead of medium.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,586 Posts
I'm your hight, but have shorter legs(long torso). I'm running the Large size, and couldn't be happier. I'm running it as a Trail/AM bike and are using a fox 34 talas on it, shorter stem, and wider bars. I would recommend the size L for you. The slack seattube will probably make it unbalanced in a size M, as the seat will be to far back. All recommendations I've heard of, is that if you are in between sizes, go up on the Atlas.
Well I found a used Med locally and it has me more confused. Rode in a parking lot and it felt fine, now it had a 90mm stem and flat bars. I thought for sure I'd ride and feel cramped, but didnt. The owner is going to met me at a trail and let me put my stem and bars on it for a test ride.

I will say the test ride has me really interested in a short chain stay bike. Don't get me wrong, I love my TBc, but a shorter CS and WB just makes it even more playfully.

Sorry for the derail.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,824 Posts
Kinda wish they would have labeled it ETT instead of just TT measurement in there geo chart. :) Im still excited to demo the Troy this weekend but I will definitely be trying a Large instead of medium.
Agreed. It would make more sense. That's another reason why reach and stack numbers probably mean more for determining fit than tt "measurements" with many of today's FS frames with their curved and hydroformed seat tubes and linkages, etc. Most of us aren't as linked into what those numbers should be for our personal sizing though.
 
141 - 160 of 1576 Posts
Top