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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone have any feedback on this bike? i'm looking for a cheapo SS/FG bike to ride on pavement in NYC.

i know this isn't RBR, i made a post there but its not as active as on these forums; and the Tricross can still be a decent trail bike.

My lbs is offering me the '09 Tricross Singlecross for $550, is that a good deal?
heres the bike: http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bc/...2&menuItemId=0

It weighs about 21.5lbs stock @ size 52, which would be the size i get.
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Bedwards Of The West
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I just spent a week in NYC and gave some serious thought to what kind of bike I would ride if I lived there. I definitely think a single speed would be sweet and practical in the city (depending on how far your trip into the city is). I'm a huge fan of my 'cross bike, but I had to think that a single speed rigid 29'er would be the ideal NYC bike. curbs, steps, and the like are just not as hoppable on a 'cross bike, and I could see the need to be hopping curbs/islands/steps regularly.

You know your commute though...might not be an issue for you. That is a solid bike and a great deal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
yes i do like to hop curbs and stairs and the like, but i also wanted something light and fast. a cheap SS 29er can't be had for $550

and the tricross has a carbon fork with the zert inserts; what are these btw?
 

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zertz are rubber nubbins that're supposed to filter out some of the high frequency oscilaltions from the road.... :confused:


they're supposed to make the ride a bit smoother. :D
 

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No-Brakes Cougar
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louisssss said:
yes i do like to hop curbs and stairs and the like, but i also wanted something light and fast. a cheap SS 29er can't be had for $550

and the tricross has a carbon fork with the zert inserts; what are these btw?
In addition to those listed by Gary the No-Trash Cougar: The 2010 DAWES DEADEYE will be only $319 delivered. This SS 29er will be the lowest priced high-grade 29er option all. Very durable for your use. Sizes 15, 17, 19, 21: Colors Black, White, Orange

Should be available before the end of the month.
Deadeye is certain to be one of the best selling SS 29ers around
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
i didn't consider those bikes pictured above because they are too heavy, and i have a mountain bike already....

I'm waiting on my lbs to give me a better deal, then i'll hop on it
 

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louisssss said:
Anyone have any feedback on this bike? i'm looking for a cheapo SS/FG bike to ride on pavement in NYC.

i know this isn't RBR, i made a post there but its not as active as on these forums; and the Tricross can still be a decent trail bike.

My lbs is offering me the '09 Tricross Singlecross for $550, is that a good deal?
heres the bike: http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bc/...2&menuItemId=0

It weighs about 21.5lbs stock @ size 52, which would be the size i get.
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I say go for it, it's a great bike.
 

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i also unicycle
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when i had a geared tricross i loved it, could fit 700x40 on the rear and bigger up front no problem. the singlecross is a great bike, i've got several customers using them as commuter/gravel/beater bikes and they're holding up great. handling is sharper than an mtb, but not super tight like a track or steeper road bike. if i lived in a larger metro i'd certainly think about one.
 

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Fat-tired Roadie
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When I lived in New York, I commuted on an old Panasonic converted to singlespeed. Can't remember my tire size offhand, but they were no bigger than 27x1-1/4". I liked using a road bike because while it takes a little more finesse to hop curbs and stairs, it's much quicker going up and down those long north-south avenues. Also, I like drop bars for sprinting. :thumbsup:

Langster vs. Tricross...

I'd start with the brakes - the Tricross has those little mini-Vs and room for knobbies - another poster has said they'll take a 2.0" tire. A setup like that would be enough to go riding in Cunningham Park and have a good time. The Tricross also has a significantly longer wheelbase and slightly slacker angles. So it should be more stable, but not as agile. And a lot of Langster models have weird handlebars; previous years' models frequently have a stubby little interrupter lever rather than aero brakes.

I would doubt that the Tricross comes with a rear hub that accepts a track cog and lockring - almost nobody does cyclocross fixed. OTOH, Specialized describes it as having a "track hub." So maybe it does - but if you want to ride fixed, make sure you check it out on the bike your LBS is offering.

I'd say you need to start by deciding whether you want a pavement-only setup or if you want to go off-road sometimes. You also should decide whether or not you want to do fixed-gear. While it would certainly be possible to have a fixed/free on-road/off-road bike, I think it would be a real PITA to convert it between those configurations, at least without owning a second set of wheels.
 

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If I could fit 28 tyres in a langster i would buy it every time over the singlecross. Its frame weighs like 400g less, the wheels on the tricross are kinda heavy, a pair of OP or ambrosia wheels would be light and strong (back wheel is inherently stronger on single speeds so why over build?) tighter wheelbase, what else?
 

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1 year later thread resurrection! welcome!

what else?
canti brakes, real world mud and snow clearance and it's built tougher and with better offroad geometry than the langsters.
not as important for fair-weather commuters, but for those of us hitting ice and snow and dirt paths it means the tricross is more versatile and probably going to be used way farther through the year than the langster would. a bit closer to "one bike to rule all roads" as it were.

(please don't say "yeah but who rides through snow" cause we've several threads devoted to snow-muters) :D

I was thinking of getting one, but there's a kona major one at one of my lbs's that's been winking at me for months...
 

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Fat-tired Roadie
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I wonder if the OP ended up buying one of these bikes. It's fun to participate in these hypothetical threads, but I wish we got more threads with the OP's decision, and experience over a long term.
 

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byknuts said:
1 year later thread resurrection! welcome!

what else?
canti brakes, real world mud and snow clearance and it's built tougher and with better offroad geometry than the langsters.
not as important for fair-weather commuters, but for those of us hitting ice and snow and dirt paths it means the tricross is more versatile and probably going to be used way farther through the year than the langster would. a bit closer to "one bike to rule all roads" as it were.

(please don't say "yeah but who rides through snow" cause we've several threads devoted to snow-muters) :D

I was thinking of getting one, but there's a kona major one at one of my lbs's that's been winking at me for months...
How tough do you want your all year bike? Its not exactly going mountain biking...canti brakes are *****es but I concede on the clearance issues but i doubt this bike is gonna be ridden through deep mud. If it was so good why have spesh dropped the model?
 

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well if we're gonna get personal about it... how tough do I need MY commuter? (scroll to bottom fro short answer)

all-year means about 70 pounds of kid+ trailer at least 70% of the time (and growing!) The wife should haul him more often but there you go... daddy's a mule! :D
And thin-tubed roadie bikes aren't anyone's first choice when carrying heavy loads.

Of course this being a mtb forum means most of us either have offroad portions to our commute or are at least willing to skip our commuters offroad, so yeah- cross and converted mountain bikes are common choices here.

In terms of potholes and bad roads... depends on your city, some are worse than others. Usually cities that suffer harsh winters are bad because of frost heave and salted roads degrading the asphalt more quickly. (OP's city of NY has a rep for bad roads, even have a company making tires designed for them called Big Apples! ;) )
So tire clearance for fatties is a great idea.

For many, a change into proper workclothes is needed, that either means big backpack or panniers. Many newer road bikes don't have rack mounts anymore.

It's about balancing your needs and your wants, over the last few years my needs have evolved and I've discovered that I need a frame that'll hold studded tires with clearance for 1/4 inch of snow that never seems to want to come off my tire, it needs to stop hard when Mr. BMW cuts me off, and not twist itself into knots carrying a 70 pound trailer.

I want to ride my big geared skinny tired Gardin speed machine... and weather and load permitting I'd commute on it year round cause it's fun as hell! But any day I have to take my son to daycare (quite a few of those!) it's not the gardin I'm riding out on.
I'm 6'1", 205 lbs with a 32 inch waist so I'm not exactly lithe but nor am I a clydesdale.

So do I NEED a tough bike?
If I'm to ride year-round and haul my trailer- of course I do.
 

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byknuts said:
well if we're gonna get personal about it... how tough do I need MY commuter? (scroll to bottom fro short answer)

all-year means about 70 pounds of kid+ trailer at least 70% of the time (and growing!) The wife should haul him more often but there you go... daddy's a mule! :D
And thin-tubed roadie bikes aren't anyone's first choice when carrying heavy loads.

Of course this being a mtb forum means most of us either have offroad portions to our commute or are at least willing to skip our commuters offroad, so yeah- cross and converted mountain bikes are common choices here.

In terms of potholes and bad roads... depends on your city, some are worse than others. Usually cities that suffer harsh winters are bad because of frost heave and salted roads degrading the asphalt more quickly. (OP's city of NY has a rep for bad roads, even have a company making tires designed for them called Big Apples! ;) )
So tire clearance for fatties is a great idea.

For many, a change into proper workclothes is needed, that either means big backpack or panniers. Many newer road bikes don't have rack mounts anymore.

It's about balancing your needs and your wants, over the last few years my needs have evolved and I've discovered that I need a frame that'll hold studded tires with clearance for 1/4 inch of snow that never seems to want to come off my tire, it needs to stop hard when Mr. BMW cuts me off, and not twist itself into knots carrying a 70 pound trailer.

I want to ride my big geared skinny tired Gardin speed machine... and weather and load permitting I'd commute on it year round cause it's fun as hell! But any day I have to take my son to daycare (quite a few of those!) it's not the gardin I'm riding out on.
I'm 6'1", 205 lbs with a 32 inch waist so I'm not exactly lithe but nor am I a clydesdale.

So do I NEED a tough bike?
If I'm to ride year-round and haul my trailer- of course I do.
What people dont undestand about toughness is city riding not gonna break any frames (unless you get get runover!). If anything its the wheels that will fold first.

For your sort of riding/hauling a touring bike is best. The relaxed geo and long stays make the ride more comfortable without slowing you down (like fat tyres would).Chainstay length, BB height, and front center are the main differences between touring and cyclo-corss bikes:

CXs tend to have higher BBs, shorter CSs and slightly shorter FCs for quick handling and obstacle clearance. Touring bikes have longer chainstays for sure handling on a loaded bike down a mountain with a tired rider and lower BBs for stability. Touring frames also tend not to be as stiffly built, going for compliance over 1000s of miles. Don't forget, CX bikes are ridden for 1 hour plus 3/4 laps so don't tend to have braze-ons for fenders, 2nd bottle cages, nor racks.
 
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