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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am interested in the Manitou MRD R7 for 2008. But I have no idea what the differences are, or features/benefits, between the TPC model and the Absolute model. Same fork, 2 models.

Here is a link to the 2008 catalog:
http://www.hbsuspension.com/pdffile...u-catalog-low.pdf?cvar1=11/7/2007+11:42:46+AM

Appreciate any info regarding this fork. I am trying to determine whether I would prefer the TPC model, or the Absolute model. Weight is the same, everything is the same other then the damping system.

Thanx for any insight!
 

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Difference comes in the cartridge, TPC or the new Absolute PLATFORM.
Personally i really like TPC and it is tried and true.
The lightest option is the MRD absolute.
See if you can find any info about the absolute, is it like SPV?
 

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TPC vs SPV

I have the same question.

As I understand it though, SPV (Stable Platform Damping) is like a snap valve, which is like an inertial valve (?) which only allows fluid to travel when bumps come from below (terrain) and not above (pedal bob).

I am interested in the MRD (with SPV) for my Epic, which has a similar system in the rear. Not sure if I want to overdo it with the valving, though.

TPC is just their regular, fully active system, I think...

Jenson claims to be getting them in a week, btw...I imagine the other mail orders and bike shops will have the same availability.
 

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SPV vs TPC

Here's a little bit copied from bike-eu.com:

"The Minute MRD will be available with either a cartridge TPC damper or with the new Absolute Damping System. Absolute Damping ranges from wide open to fully closed in six distinct clicks, with the four intermediate settings corresponding to varying degrees of platform."

This leads me to supect that the six clicks they are speaking of vary the threshhold (commonly used word for this type of system) at which the valving opens. In other words, how big a bump does it need to take for the valve to open. Sensitivity.

We are speaking of the new Absolute Damping System, whicjh is really the SPV. Am I makiking too many assumptions? Somone who knows what the heck they're talking about please reply!
 

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I can try and give you some input but I'm not a 100% sure about how the Absolute damping works. I have not had any experience with the new forks yet. They have not yet become available for the most part. I have had a lot of experience with SPV and TPC on previous models.

I am at present using a Nixon with TPC (Twin Piston Chamber) This is what the website says about it:

"TPC Damping

TPC uses twin independent damping pistons: one optimized for rebound, the other for compression. Additionally, we use a low pressure, high volume system to eliminate cavitation (which leads to compression spikes and stiffening) and heat-related problems. Quick Range TPC allows minimum to maximum damping adjustment in a half-turn of the knob."

You have one knob on the top of the right leg to increase compression damping and one on the bottom to control rebound. TPC is very plush but the fork will bob when you get out of the saddle. Seated I find it to be very stable and I ride with very little compression damping.

MRD I believe stands for Manitou Racing Division or something and are their lighter forks. SPV (Stable Platform Valve) which they now seem to be using mostly on shocks controlled the amount of platform with air pressure. The Absolute Platform from what I have read is controlled only with a knob. Here is their advertising blurb:

"ABSOLUTE PLATFORM DAMPING

Manitou’s all new Absolute Damper is exactly that: the absolute damper for a huge range of riders. Settings go from wide open, to a light amount of platform (comparable to
Manitou’s SPV system), to a more XC-oriented amount of platform (similar to Manitou’s Snap Valve SVP system), to what is basically a fully closed, “infinite platform” setting.
All this in one knob, 5 clicks and a quick 120 degrees of rotation. Even better, the difference in performance in each position is noticeable and easy to demonstrate."

I hope some of this helps. I've been a Manitou fan for a few years but information has been hard to get.

Ronnie.
 

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For sure, the Absolute , or the SPV, are not Inertial plaforms.
They are hydraulic, low-treshold, low speed platforms.
I think the main differnce between SPD and Absolute is that the on the former the platform level is adjusted via air pressure in the spv chamber, while in the latter it is adjusted via a multi-position knob.

I am seriously considering the MRD for my Nitrous build and I will most likely choose the absolute.
fab
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have been able to get a little info on the new Absolute damping system. Like was mentioned, there is a rotary control that has distinct indents (5 or 6) and controls the compression. At max it is near a lockout state but will move with large hits.

As I understand, the TPC in lockout is a hard lockout that is like a rigid fork. The absolute will not achieve that degree of lockout, but at max, oil flow is highly restricted.

On the absolute, each click of the control is suppose to cause noticable effects.. apparantly the range (effect) of the control is broad.
 

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perryr said:
As I understand, the TPC in lockout is a hard lockout that is like a rigid fork. The absolute will not achieve that degree of lockout, but at max, oil flow is highly restricted.
Not all TPC systems have lockout. I don't believe that the R7 MRD TPC has lockout. I have seen no reference to it anywhere but I may be wrong.

Ronnie.
 

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I think the TPC fork does have a lockout. Take a look at this picture (second to last in the list) of the fork from ChainReaction. There is definitely a compression adjust knob and I assume when it is turned the whole way the fork will be locked out.

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/LargeImage.aspx?ModelID=21342&FileName=21342.jpg

While I'm here, if anyone has more info about the Absolute model, I'd like to hear it. Thanks!
 

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ndbike said:
I think the TPC fork does have a lockout. Take a look at this picture (second to last in the list) of the fork from ChainReaction. There is definitely a compression adjust knob and I assume when it is turned the whole way the fork will be locked out.
My Nixon with TPC cartridge has a very similar adjuster on top of the right leg and it definitely does not have lockout. If you take a look at the 2008 Catalogue linked above, there is no mention of lockout under "adjustments". If you look at adjustments for example the S-Type SRL shock, they specify "lockout". So I don't think it has lockout.

Ronnie.
 

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The TPC-version of the R7 MRD exists in two versions, according to german bike stores - with lockout and with remote lockout.You can see it here:
http://bike-components.de/catalog/a...889cb92d5984c&keywords=Manitou+R7+MRD&x=0&y=0

If you click onto one of the links, you get an overall description of the new R7s, but no exact details towards the real weight of each model or how the remote lockout looks. There are threads in the german IBC-Forum with some real weights of different versions (not always exactly defined):

R7 MRD for cantilever 80mm: 1359g 1330g 1418g
R7 MRD Absolute disc only 100mm: 1271g 1266g 1270g 1290g 1318g
R7 MRD Absolute disc only 80mm: 1270g
R7 MRD TPC disc only 100mm: 1270g
R7 MRD TPC disc only 80mm: 1248g 1250 g

One of these threads you can find here: http://www.mtb-news.de/forum/showthread.php?t=302096&highlight=Manitou+R7+MRD

Greetings from Germany!
 

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This is nuts! I'm thinking about putting one of these forks on an Epic frame I just bought and I just can't decide! There should be clearer information about these things.

Trelgne - those prices are significantly cheaper than the UK, chainreaction have an e650 price for the Absolute. Now all I have to do is take a German course to figure out how to order... errrrr and decide which one of the forks to buy!
 

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You're right- Manitou couldn't have made things more confusing if they'd tried.

Looks like Absolute is an evolution of SPV. For what it's worth, I've just started using an 07 R7 Platinum. I had my inital doubts, but I'm finding that the SPV on the Platinum is great for (coming from a RS Revelation with remote lockout).
 

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womble said:
You're right- Manitou couldn't have made things more confusing if they'd tried.

Looks like Absolute is an evolution of SPV. For what it's worth, I've just started using an 07 R7 Platinum. I had my inital doubts, but I'm finding that the SPV on the Platinum is great for (coming from a RS Revelation with remote lockout).
Hey Womble. How do you find the SPV? Does it prevent bob being transmitted when standing?
 

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Ssushi said:
Hey Womble. How do you find the SPV? Does it prevent bob being transmitted when standing?
I've got SPV set high enough that it doesn't bob if I stand and still try to pedal smoothly. If I simply mash, I still get bob.

Probably as a result of this, the fork doesn't seem quite as plush as my Revelation over smaller bumps. But I'm using it on an XC hardtail, so I don't mind. On bigger stuff (like riding down stairs) I was surprised at how well it softened up again.
 

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Ssushi said:
I got this link, which helps, but the site does not mention Absolute forks at all!

http://www.manitoumtb.com/home.asp?cvar1=12/6/2007+5:30:35+AM
The Manitou site does not have any 2008 forks posted yet. On another thread a representative from Manitou stated that they hope to get it updated at the beginning of next year.

Here is the advertising story for the R7 MRD with specs.

R7 MRD

ABSOLUTE PLATFORM DAMPING

Manitou’s all new Absolute Damper is exactly that: the absolute damper for a huge range of riders. Settings go from wide open, to a light amount of platform (comparable to Manitou’s SPV system), to a more XC-oriented amount of platform (similar to Manitou’s Snap Valve SVP system), to what is basically a fully closed, “infinite platform” setting. All this in one knob, 5 clicks and a quick 120 degrees of rotation. Even better, the difference in performance in each position is noticeable and easy to demonstrate.

Features:
• Category: Ultra Lightweight High-End 30mm
• Travel: 80mm, 100mm
• Wt. Lbs: 2.76 (80), 2.8 (100)
• Wt. Grams: 1253 (80), 1271 (100)
• Spring: Noble Air
• Steerer: Blue Aluminum
• Damping: Lightweight Cartridge TPC (LWCD)
• Adjustments: Air, Rebound, Compression
• Knobs: New MRD Knobs
• Leg Diameter: 30mm
• Leg Material: Alu
• Leg Finish: Ano
• Casting: Mag
• Axle: Std
• Crown MRD: Crown, Hollow Bore
• Crown Spec: Polished MRD Gray
• Bushings: Alu
• Lubrication: Semi-Bath
• Seals: Evil Genius
• Wheel Size: 26
• Disc Mounts: Post
• Disc Size: Size 210 Max
• Ride Height: (mm) 456/476
• Fork Offset: (mm) 38.1
• Max Tyre Dia: (mm) 686
• Colour: Candy Red


Ronnie.
 

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It sounds like the Absolute damper is SPV with the air pressure used to charge the damper supplanted by a mechanical device. Not sure how much of an advance that would be. For example, poke around on the list for people who ditched Fox RP3 shocks for Manitou Swingers for the pleasure of practically infinite platform adjustment with air pressure. Whatever, I'm sure the fork is great.

On a completely different tack, I kinda wish they'd go to the forward facing drops a la Marzocchi and Fox....
 
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