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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First Impressions:

This is a very nice looking fork, the white finish looks great with the red decals and polished silver crown.

Fitting to the bike is pretty standard stuff, measure and cut steerer tube, bolt on brake .......oops! wait a sec .... this is a post mount fork and it wouldn't accept my 185 Avid IS mount, so I had to resort to using a standard 90mm rotor on the Avid to test ride the bike.

Nevertheless, onwards .... :)

When I first bounced this fork on the bike, my RIP 9, it felt quite stiff initially. There was some bad stiction in the first 30mm or so of travel, then it was ultra smooth.

I checked the air in the left fork leg and pumped it to 100psi. Then I gave the damper on the right fork leg a twist...wow! The first click worked ok, then the second made the fork very stiff, the third even worse...etc. 5 clicks locked it out.

There is not enough difference between the positions, so I took the top cap off the fork to check the oil level and proceeded to drop the two small ball bearings under the cap onto the floor. Luckily, I found them, but if/when you decide to check the oil level, watch out for the bearings as you remove the adjuster cap.

I measured the oil and found it a little low, so I added 15ml of 5 weight fork oil in there, then replaced the bearings and top adjuster cap after adding some powdered graphite to the bottom of the cap to make the adjuster/bearings work slickly.

The damper felt better, there was a bit more definition between the clicks and damping positions.

Ok, gear on and ready to ride ...............


On the trail, the fork feels neutral....in a good way. The travel is very linear, a lot like the coiled conversion Reba. It feels a little stiffer than the Reba as far as twisting goes, and this is the QR version, not the TA.

I stopped and adjusted the rebound on the bottom of the fork leg to slow the return action slightly. For this first part of the ride I left the damper alone, it was in the full open position.

With the fork air pressure set at 100psi, I was getting almost full travel on the sliders over some rough steps and roots at moderate speed. At no time did the Manitou feel out of it's depth or unable to handle what I was throwing it into. The overall feeling was smooth, bottomless travel.

I set the damper on full and stood up .... hammered up a hill .... no bob from the front end. Flicked it off and hammered down the other side .... very smooth...:thumbsup:

This fork definitely shows promise. The quality seems to be there, there is adequate adjustment for rebound, damping and air pressure available. The manual says 20 hours run-in time, and I should have that on it by next week.

Just one thing ..... the "stickiness" in the first 30mm of travel after the fork has been sitting for a while. This could be due to it's being brand new, or on the other hand, something to do with the oil levels. I'll run the fork in and see how it feels by then.

For now, i'm pretty happy with the performance right out of the box. The extra travel is welcome on my RIP 9 and the fork seems to suit this kind of Am bike really well.

The overall feeling is very similar to the coiled Reba, but with the added tune-ability of the air, and more travel.

I'll post some pics shortly.



R.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Few more...

Nice fork so far...

R.

[As always, I have no connections or affiliations with the manufacturer. I am an Independant Professional Tester/Reviewer.]
 

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I'm trying to figure out what the Rasta decals on mine are for.

Do I have to roll up a fat one to be able to ride this fork, mon?
 

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You're never going to have much of a range for adjustment with the compression/ platform...and it has nothing to do with the oil levels. I have over 100 hours on this fork, and honestly...I think that 5 wt oil is just too heavy (unbelieveably) and I weigh 220 lbs. I tried everything except drilling out the ports a bit, and it wasn't until I purchased some lightweight tuning oil (2.5 wt) that I finally felt like the fork came into it's own. With the lighter weight oil, you actually can use the compression adjustment to dial out some of the brake dive (and this fork is VERY susceptible to brake dive). The extreme end of the platform still functions perfectly, locking the fork out.

One symptom that is indicative of too low an oil level is when you have the platform ON, you don't feel it engage until an inch or so into it's travel range.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
jncarpenter said:
You're never going to have much of a range for adjustment with the compression/ platform...and it has nothing to do with the oil levels. I have over 100 hours on this fork, and honestly...I think that 5 wt oil is just too heavy (unbelieveably) and I weigh 220 lbs. I tried everything except drilling out the ports a bit, and it wasn't until I purchased some lightweight tuning oil (2.5 wt) that I finally felt like the fork came into it's own. With the lighter weight oil, you actually can use the compression adjustment to dial out some of the brake dive (and this fork is VERY susceptible to brake dive). The extreme end of the platform still functions perfectly, locking the fork out.

One symptom that is indicative of too low an oil level is when you have the platform ON, you don't feel it engage until an inch or so into it's travel range.
I read your thread on this fork with interest, JNC.

Did you replace the foam rings on the damper which you previously removed?

Since topping up my damper oil, the fork seems to be functioning quite well so far, apart from the stiction at the start of the compression cycle.

I plan to ride this fork in during next week, so we shall see how it goes with some hours on it for me.

Thanks for the comments... :thumbsup:

R.
 

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I talked to Manitou/Hayes last week.

jayoutside said:
Anyone know when quality or bti or any distributors will have these in stock? I'm waiting to order through my shop - I guess chain reaction cycles bought all the first run or something????
they stated that they will ahve the next shipment of minute 29ers in the 120mm config in 2 t o3 weeks. Youll have to buy through a dealer. Heres the PN# 8521763..
 

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Harmonius Wrench
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Question

Sorry if this has been covered already. I've seen some discussion on this topic, but no difinitive answer.

I was told back last February that the Minute 120mm travel fork was internally convertible to less travel, but that the other, shorter travel offerings could not be bumped up to 120mm travel. True or false?

Comments: As one who got to ride a couple examples of this fork at the Outdoor Demo, I would say that the Minute felt slightly better in the chassis stiffness department than a Reba, and about the same as a Fox which I have also ridden. The nod going to the Fox in my mind. The Minute seemed to be okay at small bump compliance, better than the Fox shocks I rode. Big hits seemed to get sucked up fine with the Minute, but I could feel the ramping up of compression towards the end of the stroke. I didn't get that with the Fox, but then again, the Minute didn't really bother me that way.

Keeping in mind that these forks were all set up rather quickly and the rides were shorter than what Rainman is probably doing here. I just thought I'd share my opinion.

It'll be interesting to get your considered take on this fork, Rainman. Thanks for taking the time and effort to do this. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
More Ride Time...

Got several more hours ride-time on this Minute 29, and did some testing of the Absolute Platform Damping....

It works ok, but makes the fork a little noisier as it tries to prevent dive over steps / rocks and under brakes.

It's a little too early to say for sure, as the fork is still running in, but i'm beginning to think that the ports in the damper are a little too small. JNC found the same thing I believe, and got around it by running very light 2.5 weight oil so that it gets through the damper ports faster.

I'm not going to change from 5 weight until the fork is run in properly, to give it a fair chance to come good, but if I have to run lighter oil eventually, I will.

The fork itself is a pleasure to ride when in the undamped position with full rebound turned on, for me.

With the Absolute Damping engaged in position one, the fork is firmer feeling and tends not to dive nearly as much. Engaging position two makes the fork quite stiff, only hard braking and big hits tend to make it react properly. It's almost as if the fork can't react quickly enough because of the oil or ports. Being new and not run in doesn't help either.

Positions 3, 4, and 5 aren't much different, position 5 is full solid feeling lockout.

Climbing:

On the RIP 9 I haven't noticed any bad effects with the longer travel fork when climbing, so far. The front end doesn't dance around in the air or anything, it tracks well as long as you keep some weight on the front end.

In high speed corners there is no indication that the fork is doing anything that it shouldn't, there is no unwanted wash out or sideways chatter when cranked over.

Under very hard 100% braking force, the fork behaves itself well. There is a lot of dive if you hit it hard with the brake when in the undamped position, but this can be controlled with the Absolute Damper which takes away a lot of the front end dive. In this it is similar to every other fork i've tried, no better or worse.

I mostly rode it today in position one on the damper. This still gave a pretty good ride but made the fork much more stable under brakes.

There is a heavier spring available which should have come with my fork, but didn't. I'm currently chasing this up. I'm thinking that some riders over say .... 220lbs+ may benefit from the stronger/firmer spring.

Overall, i'm still happy with this Manitou fork. It shows much promise, and I believe that with some fine tuning it could be very good indeed.

I'll continue to put more run-in hours on it during this week as long as the weather holds.

R.
 

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Sounds like your findings parallel mine. Do you get a "clicking" sound when you have any level of platform engaged? Goes away when you open the compression all the way.

Not sure I know what the spring you referenced is...as the fork uses an air spring. There is a spring under the "piston head" on the air side that, I'm assuming, acts to create a more linear progression in the ramp up.

You can see it pictured here...in the top stack.



In the end...I agree that the fork has alot of potential, but will require a person to do some tuning mods to get optimum performance.
 

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rear shock

jncarpenter said:
Sounds like your findings parallel mine. Do you get a "clicking" sound when you have any level of platform engaged? Goes away when you open the compression all the way.

Not sure I know what the spring you referenced is...as the fork uses an air spring. There is a spring under the "piston head" on the air side that, I'm assuming, acts to create a more linear progression in the ramp up.

You can see it pictured here...in the top stack.



In the end...I agree that the fork has alot of potential, but will require a person to do some tuning mods to get optimum performance.
Jncarpenter:

What rear shcok u running now and could u post a pic of ur cool looking Turner as well pls if not to much trouble.
 

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wrench
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I seem to remember from past team experiance when sponsored by Manitou, the small coil spring on the air spring would, when compressed, tap the inner stantion tube creating a small clicking noise. Manitou's fix was a litttle electrical shrink wrap on the spring to give it a buffer from the inner tube.
 

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mattomoto said:
I seem to remember from past team experiance when sponsored by Manitou, the small coil spring on the air spring would, when compressed, tap the inner stantion tube creating a small clicking noise. Manitou's fix was a litttle electrical shrink wrap on the spring to give it a buffer from the inner tube.
Interesting thought...does seem to be linked to the damper adjustment tho. I'll give it a try & see :thumbsup:
 

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Post adaptor

Rainman said:
First Impressions:
wait a sec .... this is a post mount fork and it wouldn't accept my 185 Avid IS mount, so I had to resort to using a standard 90mm rotor on the Avid to test ride the bike.
R.
Just got my post adaptor. Rainman you need Avid Part # 00-5315-012-020.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
jncarpenter said:
Sounds like your findings parallel mine. Do you get a "clicking" sound when you have any level of platform engaged? Goes away when you open the compression all the way.

Not sure I know what the spring you referenced is...as the fork uses an air spring. There is a spring under the "piston head" on the air side that, I'm assuming, acts to create a more linear progression in the ramp up.

You can see it pictured here...in the top stack.



In the end...I agree that the fork has alot of potential, but will require a person to do some tuning mods to get optimum performance.
The spring I was referring to is that one in the pic, I heard that a stronger one is available, but I was wrong, apparently. It seems that the one that comes with the fork is the only option.

I agree with the damping ...mine sometimes had a "clicking" sound when engaged. I thought that it was a bit strange.

What are the oil capacities for both legs jnc? As you have already had yours completely apart, how much oil did you put in each leg when you re-built?

R.
 
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