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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Which is a better bike for XC? I am helping my friend shop around and these were the two bikes he was looking at based on a consumer report article. In the article it listed the FSR #2 and the NRS2 as #3. He wasnt interested in the other bikes listed based on availability.

NRS2 has the No Resonaced System for antibob but what does the FSR do to prevent bobbing?

Thanks
 

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There's a lot of discussion about NRS vs. FSR and I'm not entirely familiar with it, so I'll just give a brief overview without claiming to be correct. Someone who knows better can correct me.

NRS works by using chain load (the force on the chain when the rider pedals) to pull the rear wheel downwards. This means that you get 100% pedaling efficiency because the rear suspension tops out when pedaling. The drawback is that the rear suspension is not fully efficient, since its performance is affected by chain load. This means that if the rider goes over a bump under high chain load, the rear suspension is less proficient at absorbing bumps. The other drawback is that there is pedal feedback, in the sense that if the rider goes over a bump, then the pedals will move a bit. It is essentially a compromised system in that it sacrifices suspension performance to eliminate bob.

The FSR works in the opposite way of the NRS in that the rear wheel moves (mostly) independently of chain load. This means that the rear suspension is not affected by chain load, and vice versa. The FSR technically still bobs, but only due to the rider physically moving up and down (i.e. when standing and pedaling hard) and not due to chain load.

Also, I believe that all of this year's FSR models come with ProPedal damping on the rear shock. This, combined with the design of the FSR, will make bobbing a non-issue. This is not to say that there's anything wrong with the NRS; it's a fine bike, but it does suffer from the problem I mentioned above.
 

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Wizard of the Trail
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Dinger left out one other point, the NRS has brake jack when under heavy braking. I had one and I hated that, plus the frames are thin. Also, I believe its only warranted for one year.
 

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abmw said:
Which is a better bike for XC? I am helping my friend shop around and these were the two bikes he was looking at based on a consumer report article. In the article it listed the FSR #2 and the NRS2 as #3. He wasnt interested in the other bikes listed based on availability.

NRS2 has the No Resonaced System for antibob but what does the FSR do to prevent bobbing?

Thanks
I've only ridden the FSR (so grain of salt here), but I think it's probably a more versatile bike. I'd put the NRS in a "Racer" category, where suspension plushness takes a backseat to climbing ability, weight, and speed. The FSR would be more enjoyable on the way down, but still would pedal great on the way up. You could race it (it's light, but not as light as the NRS) but also use it for long rides/everyday trail riding. So it really depends on what type of riding/rider he is - if he's a hardtail-lover/racer who wants to baby step into full suspension, then the NRS. Other than that, the FSR.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What is brake jack?

I actually have a NRS2 ('04) on order also so I am curious.

I got the NRS2 cause I found a good deal on it...$850 plus tax and $90 store credit<-----Thats a good deal right????? For myself i really didnt consider other bikes cause of the price...i think the FSR is over $1K

BTW...my friend just threw in a new bike into the mix..the VT3
 

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abmw said:
I actually have a NRS2 ('04) on order also so I am curious.

I got the NRS2 cause I found a good deal on it...$850 plus tax and $90 store credit<-----Thats a good deal right????? For myself i really didnt consider other bikes cause of the price...i think the FSR is over $1K

BTW...my friend just threw in a new bike into the mix..the VT3
That's a wicked deal...

The VT3 is more of an all-mountain/freeride bike, isn't it? It's quite a bit different from an FSR or NRS2.
 

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bi-winning
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warranty

Geist262 said:
Also, I believe its only warranted for one year.
I don't think that is true. I am pretty sure (not absolutely positive) that all the new giant XC bikes have a limited lifetime warranty.
 

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Wizard of the Trail
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dinger said:
That's a wicked deal...

The VT3 is more of an all-mountain/freeride bike, isn't it? It's quite a bit different from an FSR or NRS2.
Brake jack is when you use the brakes hard and your rear suspension locks out and ceases to function untill the brakes are released. Your FS turns into a hardtail untill your brakes are off.

Giant changed therir website from the last time I checked, its limited lifetime now, but when I had one, this is what it said:

"Giant Bicycle, Inc. ("Giant") warrants the steel frame and rigid steel fork of each
new Giant-brand bicycle to be free from defects in material and workmanship
for as long as the original purchaser owns the bicycle. All Aluminum and
Carbon Fiber frames and rigid forks as well as suspension frames are warranted
to be free from defects in materials and workmanship for the original owner for a
period of 5 years from the date of purchase. All other original components and
all Giant brand repair parts, replacement parts and accessories are warranted to
be free from defects in material or workmanship for a period of one year from
the original date of purchase."
 

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It sounds like you got a smoking deal on the NRS 2 and you'll be glad to know Giant has a lifetime warranty on all it's bikes now.

NRS brake jack is not a problem unless you ride the back brakes, which is bad form anyway. The '04 NRS is more active now because Giant moved the location of the Horst link. Body position also affects how active the suspension is. If you slide back on the saddle, the suspension will be more active and soft. If you slide forward on the nose of the saddle the suspension will stiffen. You can use this to your advantage once you get used to it.

The FOX AVA shock should be set-up with the AVA chamber in position #5. This is the minimum chamber volume. This will allow you to run the shock pressure at 5-10 psi less than your body weight, giving you more supple shock action without bottoming out. Run the rebound adjustment as loose as possible until it gets too springy then add a couple of clicks of damping back in.

The NRS really likes to climb with the rider seated. If you need to stand be sure to lean back slightly to keep the suspension active and maintain traction, especially if it's rocky and traction is limited.
 
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