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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

If you had a 29er with guides RS with sintered pads (needed for temp coping) on a 200mm rotor that felt underpowered despite perfect bleed, would you say it would be better fixed by :
a. bumping up the rotor size some more whilst keeping the guides
b. switching to Codes, keeping the curent rotors

Budget aside.

Simple question really but I wonder which will actually increase braking torque more whilst retaining a manageable modulation

cheers
 

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I have codes on my patrol with 180mm rotors front and rear and have never wanted for more honestly. That's riding park twice a month as well

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If you have 4 pots and 200s and it isn't enough, you should take a look at your rotors and figure out what it is about them that isn't giving you the power you need. That should be plenty for virtually any situation.
 

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^ This.

I'm very heavy (270# naked) and, with 203mm and intermediate brakes (Shimano SLX to be exact), I have plenty braking power. I'm not even sure a frame/fork for "small" diameter rotors will accept 220mm.
 

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200 to 220 rotor increases brake torque by 10%. Difference in piston area of 16 and 15 (code) vs. 16 and 14 mm (guide) diameter is 6,4%. But i'm not sure about the piston sizes as there is varying information on the internet.
 

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I just switched from 200/180 Guide R/T to 200/200 Code RSCs and rode my Bronson V3 for the first time with them today on steep and rocky stuff in Orange County, CA. I'm about 160 and 5'11'', just for some background.

I liked my Guides and didn't have any real complaints other than a warranty issue that got resolved, but my lord are the Codes better. The best way to describe the Codes is that they stop when you expect them to. When you pull them, you aren't hoping to slow down soon, you actually do without it being a dramatic change of pace.

I thought that the transition would feel like an overly touchy lever that breaks traction easily but in reality, they just feel like extremely efficient Guides. I know this doesn't really answer your question directly, but I would say that giving the Codes a try would likely solve your problem.
 

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My DH rig had come stock with Guides. Good trail bike brake but not for DH. Changed to Saints which have been a "standard" on DH bike for years. They are powerful. Pretty much everyone who has used them will tell you that. I've got a set of Codes to replace them as I find the brake pads rattle horribly on Saints, even the non-finned ones. Didn't try the Codes yet. We'll see. Anyway look at the Saints or even Zee brakes.
 

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My previous bike had Guide R's and I upgraded from 180mm rotors to 200mm. I now have Code RSC's with 200mm rotors. I'd say if the Guide's aren't cutting it then upgrade to Code's or another DH brake. The Codes have more power and have a better all around feel.
 

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change is good
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I have a Code or Saint with 200 mm rotors on the front of my 29er trail and AM bikes. The only time when the extra power is a detriment is in snowy conditions.


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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for the inputs

I only feel the guides are "underpowered", sort off, on enduro single tracks when I'm in the steep I need to maintain a slow rolling pace despite the decline. In that situation, the rotor RPM is low, but the torque is really high I guess at the brakes (29er) and I feel my tires are offering more grip than the brakes can comfortably use.

Of course if I really want to, I can lock a wheel. I just feel I have to squeeze the lever harder than I should to go there and find the limits of the tire grip. On long technical tracks I get sore hands for squeezing the levers that hard for long.

I must say that I don't have a high technical level and there's no question I'm using my brakes more than some others. I have tried organic but they don't resist fading so well so after a while it gets worse than with sintered.

I also find the guides levers not to be rugged enough, the slightest crash ruins the shiny black paint.

Other than that, I think they're great and powerful enough besides the steepest tracks...
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
I have a Pike 2018 up front, it has a 180mm post mount, currently a +20 post-post adapter (stock configuration) to 200mm rotor, I don't remember where I read that I it can take 220mm rotor using a +40mm post-post adapter on a Pike
-EDIT- actually it's in the Pike specs document (=223mm max rotor size)

I'm giving some thoughts to upgrading the brakes, found Magura MT7 brakes are a strong alternative to Codes (and I can get MT7 Pro set cheaper than codes) but there seem to be conflicting feedback on comparing the two

I very much prefer Magura's calipers and discs look but switching to Magura means switching bleed kit, front post adapter (to 203mm), and loosing Sram matchmaker which I happily use for both sides... plus the leap of faith on the modulation
 

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Worst case scenario is that you have to sell there here on PB and try something else. If you can get a deal on them then in long-run, the only thing that you'll be out of is time.
 
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