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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I designed two new types of service racks. One is wall mounted and one is trailer hitch mounted. Both are all aluminum and use your seat post. An extra seat post to remain attached would be recommended. I have enough materials to make eight (8) more of each design. Give me you thoughts if you think there is a market and what the market price should be.

Advantages/disadvantages:

Every different design has pros and cons. Here's mine.

LTA wall mount:

The wall mount just needs a solid surfact to mount to. Could be a work bench as well as a wall. When not in use, the arm can be folded vertically down or up so it is out of the way. Super strong angle mounting plates also look high tech industrial. The arm can be custom cut to desired lenght. Drawback: the longer you make it, the more flex it will have. The one shown is 56" long to clean some other object that normally reside along the wall where it is mounted. At 56", it will rock and bounce when applying torque to the bike or rotating the pedals. The shorter you make the arm, the more ridig it will be. I expect 2-3 feet will be the longest I would recommend.

LTA hitch mount:

The trailer hitch mount is designed to carry along on trips for maintenance, adjusting, cleaning, etc. You supply the hitch and bolt. The one pictured had enough length and angle to allow it work be used with the tailgate up or down. Tailgate down is good for using the gate as a work bench, sitting, etc. But the extra length required to lower the tailgate creates more flex like the longer arm above. I can custom make it to any angle or height desired. The most sturdy would be vertical from the hitch with a short arm on top. Tailgate would have to remain closed for this design.

Let's see if I can attach some pictures.

All comments appreciated; positive or negative.
 

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Looks frustrating to mount up, compared to using a simple vice. Is it as frustrating as it looks like it might be?
 

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would not buy. removing the seat and messing with the bolts to work on my bike? no. there are better products out there. no market for this sorry
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Once it's installed and your seat post is attached, it's just a matter of removing your seat, lift the bike, insert the seat post and tighted the clamp on your bike. But sure a vise is quicker.
 

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super jim said:
Once it's installed and your seat post is attached, it's just a matter of removing your seat, lift the bike, insert the seat post and tighted the clamp on your bike. But sure a vise is quicker.
oh I see, I got the impression that you would unmount the seat and some how bolt the post to the rig. But your saying you leave the post in the rig. I see one potential problem, there are many different sizes of posts, so unless all your bikes have the same size seat post there might be some frustration.
 

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I can certainly appreciate someone trying something new, but it's not something I would buy. No way to rotate the bike. And I'd be concerned about the very small contact area that's actually holding the bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
No definately not for transporting! Sounds like I can move on to another idea or back to the drawing board on this one. Thanks for the input.
 

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Constructive criticism: both are too low. you will break your back working on your bike. Use a traditional clamp and clamp the seatpost. Taking off the seat adds lots of work for most and depending on seatpost design, it can be hard to get the same angle again leading to setup issues every time you work on your bike. You can buy those clamps seperatly and depending on design they aren't that much. Third, your shop one is a mile from the wall because you needed that, but most people keep their tools along the wall and will want the bike closer. Also, the shop one could be easily modified to allow easy height changes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks. Yes, I wondered about the height and for sure having a shorter arm to have the bike closer to the wall would be a plus. I my case I think I will shorten the arm and move my motorcycles and dog kennel out of the way when I need to work on the bike.

I was concerned about clamping my carbon seat post so that's why I avoided a clamp (plus the cost).

Good points.

Jim
 

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I clamp my carbon seat posts all the time. Anything that is strong enough to hold up a 250# rider should be able to stand clamping.
 

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doesn't look pleasing to me, and doesn't look very functional.

i'd rather take my "entry level" PCS-9 park stand. if there was something more economical, i'd might even consider that over this. a few pieces of aluminum plates and you're trying to sell this?

and + theres flex? there can't be any flex when you're putting more than 20lbs of pressure onto the bike when torquing stuff down.

+ that trailer mount looks pointless? who will work on their bike attached to a car? why not just buy a stand? what if my car is not parked exactly where i want to work on my bike? people with carbon/ti posts will not want to pull out their posts every time. This scratches the post and requires a re-application of carbon or Ti paste which isn't cheap and is also time consuming. an extra step in something that can be avoided.

a stand can also be moved around, can be shared, and can be sold.

How much to buyt one of these things?
 

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all great inventions face many failures before they take off. while your idea of getting the bike up and out of the way looks great for the shop mount im with everyone on try a different approach then the seat post. too much fuss. most guys just wanna grab their bike and go. ill also agree to making it adjustable for different heights. i can see your main objective is out of the way storage but some guys are going to want to work their bike in the stand and then get it outta the way when its time to park the car. .i understand that to get the height it has to come that far from the wall. maybe make the device double armed on a sliding mount that travels up and down the channel for different heights with a pin... add a counter spring or small gas strut and i think your onto something.

as far as the car model i think u could adapt the above suggestions into this unit also. the major con to this unit so far that no one has addressed is stress on the actual down tube. some frames are weaker then others and while id applaud u for finding a way to break the knowingly weak welds on my ferrous 29ers down tube so i can get that sucker warrantied for a black one i dont think the rest of the groups going to share my views.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks for the tips.

I modified the wall mount by shortening the arm and making it rectangular instead of just channel. That made it very rigid. I also added a pony clamp. Must better now.
 

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