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Down South Yooper
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So I've got a new cross-check to build up, and I'd like to use an XTR crankset that I have for the front. The middle ring is shot, and I'd prefer to swap it for a spiderless single, but I'm a little worried that I'll be dropping the chain frequently with a 9spd rear setup. From what I've read, most people are recommending a single guard with a third hand inside, or a double guard setup.

Anybody running a 1x9 without guards with good results? This bike will be used primarily around town, but off road jaunts aren't out of the question either. I'd hate to scar up the frame by dropping the chain, plus I don't want to deal with it.

If it matters, I'm planning on using a campy chorus 9spd rear cassette (11-25 or so) with a 34t spiderless ring.

Is there a spiderless ring/guarded combo available? Are there guards that bolt to the spiderless rings?

Thanks for the input.

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I have my commuter bike set up as 1x8 without any guards on the front. My commute is fairly smooth, though... mostly road and paved bike path, with about 100ft of rooty singletrack on a shortcut. I haven't dropped my chain at all. Here are a few things that'll help alot:

1. Use a non-ramped, singlespeed chainring - designed to NOT have the chain drop
2. Run a short cage road derailleur - holds the chain alot tigher
3. Shorten the chain as much as possible - less slack

That said, if I wanted to ride this bike offroad more, I would still put a chain guard on the outside and N-Gear Jump Stop on the inside.

As far as the spiderless rings, I'm pretty sure the Spot rings have holes that line up with their 110mm BCD chainguard, so that is an option. Personally, though, I think it would look alot better (and cost much less) to use a normal spider setup with a guard.
 

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cloughja said:
I have my commuter bike set up as 1x8 without any guards on the front. My commute is fairly smooth, though... mostly road and paved bike path, with about 100ft of rooty singletrack on a shortcut. I haven't dropped my chain at all. Here are a few things that'll help alot:

1. Use a non-ramped, singlespeed chainring - designed to NOT have the chain drop
2. Run a short cage road derailleur - holds the chain alot tigher
3. Shorten the chain as much as possible - less slack

That said, if I wanted to ride this bike offroad more, I would still put a chain guard on the outside and N-Gear Jump Stop on the inside.

As far as the spiderless rings, I'm pretty sure the Spot rings have holes that line up with their 110mm BCD chainguard, so that is an option. Personally, though, I think it would look alot better (and cost much less) to use a normal spider setup with a guard.
All other things being equal, why would a short cage rear der hold the chain a lot tighter? It seems to me that the longer longer cage models would take up more slack because of their extra length, ie. the longer the length the cage the more chain consumed therefore the tighter the chain. (Not that I'm trying to argue - just trying to understand how this would work.)

Great thread though - I'm converting my mountain bike to a 1x8 and have been wondering about whether a non-ramped ring would help things out or not.
 

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The Issue is...

that to accomodate the longer derailleur cage, one needs a longer chain. When you shift into a smaller cog, the amount of chain required to 'wrap' that combo is smaller, so there come a point when the chain becomes quite slack. A shorter derailleur will allow you t o run a shorter (lighter if you care) chain and as such minimize the slack when you upshift.
 

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Shawn595 said:
All other things being equal, why would a short cage rear der hold the chain a lot tighter? It seems to me that the longer longer cage models would take up more slack because of their extra length, ie. the longer the length the cage the more chain consumed therefore the tighter the chain. (Not that I'm trying to argue - just trying to understand how this would work.)

Great thread though - I'm converting my mountain bike to a 1x8 and have been wondering about whether a non-ramped ring would help things out or not.
This issue comes down to leverage... most derailleurs are going to have the same torsional springs attached to the cage, regardless of cage length. With a longer cage, as you ride over rough stuff and the chain bounces around, the chain is pulling on a longer lever (the cage) against that spring, making it easier to get chain slap, slack, and come off the front. With a short cage, the distance between where the chain force is acting and the spring is counteracting is shorter, making the derailleur more effective at holding the chain still.

The only reason to use longer cage derailleurs is, as mentioned above, to wrap up the extra slack created when you run a chain that's long enough for a big (say 42t) chainring on a small (say 22t) granny gear.
 

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Thanks for the explanation guys. That makes more sense to me now. If I rip the rear der off my bike somehow (although I hope that doesn't happen) I'll consider a shorter caged one.
 

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Been running a 1x8 for a few years now on an errand and sport duty cross country bike. No problems ever with the front. I've got the 32 on the middle position and a bash ring on the outer. It does cross chain by more than I like but with the rampless ring I've never had a problem with it shifting off.
 

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6x7=Dont Panic!
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Ive been running a 1x9 and was dropping the chain frequently. Untill I bought a rohloff guide. That thing is awesome. Although, I dont have access to the largest cogs on the cassette, but I dont use them anyhow.
 

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TheRedMantra said:
Ive been running a 1x9 and was dropping the chain frequently. Untill I bought a rohloff guide. That thing is awesome. Although, I dont have access to the largest cogs on the cassette, but I dont use them anyhow.
Ramped or rampless ring? I'm thinking that the reason I've been OK is because my ring has no ramps or pins. For once cheap won out?.... :D
 

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Let's ride
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I tried running 1x9 without a guide. Chain was dropping on the outside anytime it got rough. I really wanted it to work, but had to bite the bullet and put the front der back on.

RF turbine 32, with 760 11/32 cass and 7800 rr der.

Going to try a bash ring this week.
 

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Don't give up. I'm telling you, the chainguide really is simple and WORKS! Here is a pic of the one I made for my bike. I've been riding it this way for over a year now (atleast 2000 miles of singletrack), and I've only dropped my chain a handful of times.
 
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